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Revelation and Reason in Christian Theology
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Revelation and Reason in Christian Theology

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Lexham Press 2018

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The Intersection of Revelation and Reason

Do revelation and reason contradict?

Throughout the church’s history Christians have been tempted to make revelation and reason mutually exclusive. But both are essential to a true understanding of the faith.

The inaugural Theology Connect conference—held in Sydney in July 2016—was dedicated to surveying the intersection of revelation and reason. In Revelation and Reason in Christian Theology Christopher C. Green and David I. Starling draw together the fruit of this conference to provoke sustained, deep reflection on this relationship. The essays—filtered through epistemological, biblical, historical, and dogmatic lenses—critically and constructively contribute to this important and developing aspect of theology.

Each essayist approaches revelation and reason according to the psalmist’s words: “In your light we see light” (Ps 36:9). The light of faith does not obscure truth; rather, it enables us to see truth.

Studies in Historical and Systematic Theology

Studies in Historical and Systematic Theology is a peer-reviewed series of contemporary monographs exploring key figures, themes, and issues in historical and systematic theology from an evangelical perspective.

Learn more about the other titles in this series.

Praise for Revelation and Reason

This inaugural volume from the first Theology Connect conference lives up to its name and vocation: each chapter refuses the typical modern reflex of seeing reason and revelation as opposites and offers fresh insight into matters at the heart of Christian theology. Readers will find compelling biblical, historical, and theological arguments for beating what were once opposing epistemological swords into prolegomenal plowshares.

—Kevin J. Vanhoozer, Research Professor of Systematic Theology, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

This stellar collection of essays on the relationship of divine revelation to human reason is persuasively coherent in its common focus and final conclusions, yet penetrating in its rich details. Ranging across exegesis, social philosophy and epistemology, ascetic theology, and dogmatics, the authors manage a startlingly beautiful reconfiguration of reason’s shape within the particular realities of Christian faith and life. Instead of the modernist conception of reason as an instrument of human domination, for coercive good or ill, reasoning here emerges as a creature wonderfully nourished by God’s self-giving in Christ and self-disclosure in Scripture, and thus capable of humbly yet truthfully engaging the world of God’s making. Each essay in its own way, and all of them taken together, offer a vision that is evangelically profound and deeply hopeful, to be received with care and thanks.

—Ephraim Radner, Professor of Historical Theology, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto

Christopher Green and David Starling have assembled a great cast of contributors for this collection of essays on revelation and reason, tackling topics related to how revelation and reason fit within a larger scheme of God’s self-disclosure, human knowing, and church theologizing. A stimulating series of investigations on how to understand faith seeking a fusion of revelation and reason.

Michael F. Bird, Lecturer in Theology at Ridley College, Melbourne, Australia

Contents

  • Introduction
  • “Let There Be Light”: A Meditation on Biblical Narration and Divine Self-Disclosure (Christopher C. Green)
  • The Public Character of Revelation: Divine Speech and Finite Reason (Daniel J. Treier)
  • The Personal and Cultural Character of Reason: Christ’s Triumph over Modern Technique (Daniel J. Treier)
  • Divine Revelation (William J. Abraham)
  • Ordering with Intent: Restoring Divine Order in Isaiah and Genesis (Caroline Batchelder)
  • “As to Sensible People”: Human Reason and Divine Revelation in 1 Corinthians 8–10 (David I. Starling)
  • Figural Reading within Contemporary Theological Interpretation of Scripture: Problems and Parameters (Chase Kuhn)
  • Meditation and Reason: Some Reflections on the Right Way to Happiness in God (Christopher R. J. Holmes)
  • A Mysterious Relationship?: Herman Bavinck on Revelation and Reason (Bruce R. Pass)
  • Discipleship on the Level of Thought: The Case of Karl Barth’s Critique of the Religion of Revelation (Chris Swann)
  • Revelation and Reason: A Christological Reflection (John McClean)
  • Free Speech: Scripture in the Context of Divine Simplicity and Divine Freedom (Steven J. Duby)
  • Christ in Creation: Shortcut to Liberalism or a Neglected Truth? (Andrew Moody)
  • Revelation, Sola Scriptura, and Regenerate Human Reason (Mark D. Thompson)

Product Details

  • Title: Revelation and Reason in Christian Theology
  • Editors: David I. Starling and Christopher C. Green
  • Series: Studies in Historical and Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2018
  • Pages: 304
  • Format: Logos Digital, Paperback
  • Trim Size: 6x9
  • ISBN: 9781683590989

About the Editors

Christopher C. Green (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is Director of Theology Connect, Senior Adjunct in Theology at Azusa Pacific University, and Director of Christian Foundations at Plenty Valley Christian College (Australia). He is author of Doxological Theology: Karl Barth on Divine Providence, Evil and the Angels

David I. Starling (PhD, University of Sydney) is head of the Bible and Theology department at Morling College. He is author of Hermeneutics as Apprenticeship, UnCorinthian Leadership, and Not my People: Gentiles as Exiles in Pauline Hermeneutics.