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Products>Barth in Conversation: Volume 3, 1964–1968

Barth in Conversation: Volume 3, 1964–1968

  • Format:Digital

$25.99

Digital list price: $31.99
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Overview

In recognition of Karl Barth’s stature as a theologian and public figure in the life of Europe and the West, Swiss publisher Theologischer Verlag Zurich (TVZ) published Conversations, a collection of correspondence, articles, interviews, and other short-form writings by Barth. Collected in three volumes, Conversations reveals the depth and breadth of Barth’s theological thought as well as his humor and humanity. Now, for the first time in English, the third and final volume is offered here. Volume 3 covers the period from 1964 to 1968, the year of Barth’s death. As such, it represents the culmination of the great theologian’s thoughts on a broad range of subjects, from the challenges of living as the church in an increasingly secular world to the distinctive joys and challenges of the pastoral vocation.

  • Features a collection of correspondence, articles, interviews, and other short-form writings
  • Reveals the depth and breadth of Barth’s theological thought
  • Represents the culmination of Barth’s thoughts on a broad range of subjects

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Karl Barth (1886–1968), a Swiss Protestant theologian and pastor, was one of the leading thinkers of twentieth-century theology, described by Pope Pius XII as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. He helped to found the Confessing Church and his thinking formed the theological framework for the Barmen Declaration. He taught in Germany, where he opposed the Nazi regime. In 1935, when he refused to take the oath of allegiance to Adolf Hitler, he was retired from his position at the University of Bonn and deported to Switzerland. There he continued to write and develop his theology.

Barth’s work and influence resulted in the formation of what came to be known as neo-orthodoxy. For Barth, modern theology, with its assent to science, immanent philosophy, and general culture and with its stress on feeling, was marked by indifference to the word of God and to the revelation of God in Jesus, which he thought should be the central concern of theology.

$25.99

Digital list price: $31.99
Save $6.00 (18%)