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Mobile Ed: BI205 Old Testament Exegesis: Understanding and Applying the Old Testament
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Mobile Ed: BI205 Old Testament Exegesis: Understanding and Applying the Old Testament

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Lexham Press 2016

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
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Overview

Embark on a journey of OT Hebrew exegesis with Jason DeRouchie. The books of the OT were the only Scriptures Jesus had. It was books like Genesis and Deuteronomy, Isaiah and Psalms that shaped Jesus’ upbringing and that guided His life in ministry as the Jewish Messiah. It was these Scriptures that Jesus identified as God’s Word and that He considered to be authoritative; it was these Scriptures that He believed called people to know and believe in God and guarded them against doctrinal error and hell. This course will give you the tools you need to access meaning in the OT and then apply it to your life. It will help you to grow in reading God’s living Word for depth and not just distance.

For a bundle of important courses that equip students to better understand and teach Scripture, see the Mobile Ed: Studies in Biblical Interpretation Bundle, S.

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion you should be able to:

  • Approach the Old Testament text from multiple helpful scholarly viewpoints
  • Identify the genre, translation issues, and key terms of many prominent texts from the Old Testament
  • Approach passages of Scripture, looking for elements that uncover their literary content and historical setting

Course Outline

Unit 1: Text Boundaries

  • Basic Rules for Text Boundaries
  • Identifying Text Blocks
  • Distinguishing Text Types
  • Delimiting Paragraphs
  • Transition/Climax Markers
  • Markers of Immediate Significance and Inference
  • Citation Formulas
  • Text Boundaries for Exodus 19:4–6

Unit 2: Text Criticism

  • The Nature of Text Criticism: An Overview
  • Book Titles, Arrangement, and the Masorah
  • The Textual Apparatus
  • The Most Important Texts and Versions
  • Some Common Scribal Errors
  • Guidelines for Text Criticism
  • Text Criticism in Exodus 19:4–6

Unit 3: Translation

  • Making Your Translation
  • Engaging Different Translations and Translation Theory
  • The Importance of Day 6 in Genesis 1
  • Made for Praise in Zephaniah 3:20
  • Translation of Exodus 19:4–6

Unit 4: Grammar

  • A Man after God’s Heart? Grammar in 1 Samuel 13:14
  • What Is Grammar?
  • Clauses and Sentences
  • Delimiting Clauses and the Thought Flow of Exodus 19:4
  • Markers of Immediate Significance
  • The Inference Markers and the Use of וְעַתָּה in Exodus 19:5
  • Thought Flow of Genesis 12:1–3
  • Verbless Clauses: Subject vs. Predicate
  • The Grammar of the Shema in Deuteronomy 6:4
  • Text Blocks, Reported Speech, and Embedded Discourse
  • More on Marked and Unmarked Clauses: Part 1
  • More on Marked and Unmarked Clauses: Part 2
  • Determining the Protasis and Apodosis in Exodus 19:4–6
  • The Thought Flow of Exodus 19:4–6
  • The Function of כִּי in Exodus 19:4–6
  • The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible: An Overview
  • The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible on Exodus 19:4–6

Unit 5: Structure

  • Stage 1: Capturing the Logical Relationships
  • Logical Relationships in Genesis 12:1–3
  • Logical Relationships in Habakkuk 3:17–19
  • Logical Relationships in Exodus 19:4–6
  • Stage 2: Exegetical Outlining—An Introduction
  • Stage 2: Exegetical Outlining—The Process in Genesis 12:1–3
  • Exegetical Outline of Habakkuk 3:17–19
  • Exegetical Outline of Exodus 19:4–6

Unit 6: Genre

  • Defining Genre and Its Relationship to Exodus 19:4–6
  • Putting Genre within Its Biblical Context
  • Genre Analysis and the OT’s Polemical Theology
  • Differences of Genre and the Question of Historicity
  • Psalms
  • The Variety of the Psalm Genres
  • Psalms of Lament, Trust, and Thanksgiving
  • Genre Analysis: Benefits and Cautions
  • Narrative
  • The Distinctive Nature of Biblical Narrative
  • Biblical Narratives—Factual History or Myth?
  • Guidelines for Interpreting OT Narrative
  • Interpreting the Historical Narrative in 1 Kings
  • Prophecy
  • The Distinctive Nature of YHWH Prophecy
  • The Categories of Prophetic Oracles
  • Principles for Interpreting OT Prophecy: Part 1
  • Principles for Interpreting OT Prophecy: Part 2
  • Law as a Subset of Prophecy
  • Proverbs
  • General Characteristics of Biblical Proverbs
  • Reconsidering the Familiar Proverbs
  • Are There Ever Absolute Proverbs?

Unit 7: Word Studies

  • Understanding Your Lexicons and Theological Wordbooks
  • Principles for Using Your Lexicon and Performing Word Studies
  • Four Factors to Remember When Doing Word Studies
  • סְגֻלָּה (“Treasured Possession”) in Exodus 19:5: Part 1
  • סְגֻלָּה (“Treasured Possession”) in Exodus 19:5: Part 2
  • זֶ֫רַע (“Seed”) in the OT
  • “YHWH” in Zephaniah

Unit 8: Historical Context

  • Key Questions for Assessing Historical Context
  • Key Spheres in Which to Establish Historical Context
  • Shared Assumptions and the Bible’s Clarity
  • Engaging Historical Context Errors and Guidelines
  • The Historical Context of 1 Samuel 13:14
  • Geographical Details in Deuteronomy 1:1
  • The Historical Context of Exodus 19:4–6

Unit 9: Literary Context

  • Grasping Literary Context
  • The Theological Message of Each OT Book (The OT in Ten Minutes)
  • The Literary Flow of Psalms
  • Psalm 121 in Its Literary Context
  • Flow of Thought in the Book of the Twelve
  • The Literary Context of Exodus 19:4–6: Part 1
  • The Literary Context of Exodus 19:4–6: Part 2

Unit 10: Biblical Theology

  • The Presuppositions of Biblical Theology: Part 1
  • The Presuppositions of Biblical Theology: Part 2
  • Biblical Theology’s Task
  • Biblical Theology and Salvation-Historical Connections: Part 1
  • Biblical Theology and Salvation-Historical Connections: Part 2
  • Biblical Theology and Literary-Canonical Connections
  • Biblical Theology and the Relationship of the Testaments
  • Biblical Theology and the Centrality of Christ
  • The Bible’s Frame, Form, Focus, and Fulcrum
  • The Kingdom of Priests in Exodus 19:4–6 and Redemptive History: Part 1
  • The Kingdom of Priests in Exodus 19:4–6 and Redemptive History: Part 2

Unit 11: Systematic Theology

  • What Is Systematic Theology?
  • Systematic Theology and Exodus 19:4–6: Soteriology
  • Systematic Theology and Exodus 19:4–6: Missiology
  • Ecclesiology and Eschatology in Zephaniah 3:9–10

Unit 12: Pastoral Theology

  • The Importance and Challenge of Applying the OT
  • Reasons the OT Is Still Important
  • The OT Was Written for Christians: Part 1
  • The OT Was Written for Christians: Part 2
  • Guidelines for Application with a Look at Exodus 19:4–6: Part 1
  • Guidelines for Application with a Look at Exodus 19:4–6: Part 2
  • The Christian and OT Law
  • Establishing the Law’s Relevance for Christians
  • Assessing the Threefold Division of the Law
  • Guidelines for Applying OT Law
  • House Building with Love in Deuteronomy 22:8
  • Gender Confusion in Deuteronomy 22:5
  • Keeping the Sabbath in Deuteronomy 5:12: Part 1
  • Keeping the Sabbath in Deuteronomy 5:12: Part 2
  • The Christian and OT Promises
  • The Challenge and Necessity of Applying OT Promises to Christians
  • Guidelines for the Christian’s Application of OT Promises: Part 1
  • Guidelines for the Christian’s Application of OT Promises: Part 2
  • Kept in Perfect Peace in Isaiah 26:3: Part 1
  • Kept in Perfect Peace in Isaiah 26:3: Part 2
  • Preaching Christ and the Gospel from the OT

Product Details

  • Title: BI205 Old Testament Exegesis: Understanding and Applying the Old Testament
  • Instructor: Jason DeRouchie
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Product Type: Logos Mobile Education
  • Resource Type: Courseware, including transcripts, audio, and video resources
  • Courses: 1
  • Video Hours: 15

About the Instructor

Jason S. DeRouchie received his PhD at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and is associate professor of Old Testament at Bethlehem College and Seminary. He is coauthor of A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew and A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew: Workbook.

Logos Mobile Education is a highly effective cross-platform learning environment that integrates world class teaching with the powerful study tools and theological libraries available in Logos Bible Software. Every course provides links to additional resources and suggested readings that supplement the lecture material at the end of every transcript segment.

This course comes with an Activities resource that functions as a type of “workbook” for the course. This resource includes learning activities such as: places for you to respond to reflection questions, exercises that will challenge and show you how deepen your understanding of this course by using specific Logos tools and resources, tutorial videos on different features of Logos Bible Software, and links to relevant Logos guides and tools. A link to open the Activities resource is conveniently placed at the end of every segment.