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Mobile Ed: Biblical Exegesis Bundle
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Mobile Ed: Biblical Exegesis Bundle

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Lexham Press 2016

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Overview

When people interpret the Bible, even though they may have the best motives in the world, they can still read their ideas into the Bible rather than draw out what the author originally intended to mean. Don’t miss the whole point of exegesis. It’s to know and worship God. Dr. DeRouchie and Dr. Naselli will help you exegete the Old Testament and New Testament texts in the Biblical Exegesis Bundle.

For a bundle of important courses that equip students to better understand and teach Scripture, see the Mobile Ed: Studies in Biblical Interpretation Bundle, S.

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion you should be able to:

  • Understand characteristics that make for a great Bible translation
  • Describe the rationale behind interpretive decisions that remain faithful to the intent of the original author
  • Recognize key Scriptural phrases and their meaning
  • Approach the Old Testament text from multiple helpful scholarly viewpoints
  • Identify the genre, translation issues, and key terms of many prominent texts from the Old Testament
  • Approach passages of Scripture, looking for elements that uncover their literary content and historical setting

Individual Titles

BI205 Old Testament Exegesis: Understanding and Applying the Old Testament

  • Instructor: Jason DeRouchie
  • Video Hours: 15

Embark on a journey of OT Hebrew exegesis with Jason DeRouchie. The books of the OT were the only Scriptures Jesus had. It was books like Genesis and Deuteronomy, Isaiah and Psalms that shaped Jesus’ upbringing and that guided His life in ministry as the Jewish Messiah. It was these Scriptures that Jesus identified as God’s Word and that He considered to be authoritative; it was these Scriptures that He believed called people to know and believe in God and guarded them against doctrinal error and hell. This course will give you the tools you need to access meaning in the OT and then apply it to your life. It will help you to grow in reading God’s living Word for depth and not just distance.

Contents:

Unit 1: Text Boundaries
  • Basic Rules for Text Boundaries
  • Identifying Text Blocks
  • Distinguishing Text Types
  • Delimiting Paragraphs
  • Transition/Climax Markers
  • Markers of Immediate Significance and Inference
  • Citation Formulas
  • Text Boundaries for Exodus 19:4–6
Unit 2: Text Criticism
  • The Nature of Text Criticism: An Overview
  • Book Titles, Arrangement, and the Masorah
  • The Textual Apparatus
  • The Most Important Texts and Versions
  • Some Common Scribal Errors
  • Guidelines for Text Criticism
  • Text Criticism in Exodus 19:4–6
Unit 3: Translation
  • Making Your Translation
  • Engaging Different Translations and Translation Theory
  • The Importance of Day 6 in Genesis 1
  • Made for Praise in Zephaniah 3:20
  • Translation of Exodus 19:4–6
Unit 4: Grammar
  • A Man after God’s Heart? Grammar in 1 Samuel 13:14
  • What Is Grammar?
  • Clauses and Sentences
  • Delimiting Clauses and the Thought Flow of Exodus 19:4
  • Markers of Immediate Significance
  • The Inference Markers and the Use of וְעַתָּה in Exodus 19:5
  • Thought Flow of Genesis 12:1–3
  • Verbless Clauses: Subject vs. Predicate
  • The Grammar of the Shema in Deuteronomy 6:4
  • Text Blocks, Reported Speech, and Embedded Discourse
  • More on Marked and Unmarked Clauses: Part 1
  • More on Marked and Unmarked Clauses: Part 2
  • Determining the Protasis and Apodosis in Exodus 19:4–6
  • The Thought Flow of Exodus 19:4–6
  • The Function of כִּי in Exodus 19:4–6
  • The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible: An Overview
  • The Lexham Discourse Hebrew Bible on Exodus 19:4–6
Unit 5: Structure
  • Stage 1: Capturing the Logical Relationships
  • Logical Relationships in Genesis 12:1–3
  • Logical Relationships in Habakkuk 3:17–19
  • Logical Relationships in Exodus 19:4–6
  • Stage 2: Exegetical Outlining—An Introduction
  • Stage 2: Exegetical Outlining—The Process in Genesis 12:1–3
  • Exegetical Outline of Habakkuk 3:17–19
  • Exegetical Outline of Exodus 19:4–6
Unit 6: Genre
  • Defining Genre and Its Relationship to Exodus 19:4–6
  • Putting Genre within Its Biblical Context
  • Genre Analysis and the OT’s Polemical Theology
  • Differences of Genre and the Question of Historicity
  • Psalms
  • The Variety of the Psalm Genres
  • Psalms of Lament, Trust, and Thanksgiving
  • Genre Analysis: Benefits and Cautions
  • Narrative
  • The Distinctive Nature of Biblical Narrative
  • Biblical Narratives—Factual History or Myth?
  • Guidelines for Interpreting OT Narrative
  • Interpreting the Historical Narrative in 1 Kings
  • Prophecy
  • The Distinctive Nature of YHWH Prophecy
  • The Categories of Prophetic Oracles
  • Principles for Interpreting OT Prophecy: Part 1
  • Principles for Interpreting OT Prophecy: Part 2
  • Law as a Subset of Prophecy
  • Proverbs
  • General Characteristics of Biblical Proverbs
  • Reconsidering the Familiar Proverbs
  • Are There Ever Absolute Proverbs?
Unit 7: Word Studies
  • Understanding Your Lexicons and Theological Wordbooks
  • Principles for Using Your Lexicon and Performing Word Studies
  • Four Factors to Remember When Doing Word Studies
  • סְגֻלָּה (“Treasured Possession”) in Exodus 19:5: Part 1
  • סְגֻלָּה (“Treasured Possession”) in Exodus 19:5: Part 2
  • זֶ֫רַע (“Seed”) in the OT
  • “YHWH” in Zephaniah
Unit 8: Historical Context
  • Key Questions for Assessing Historical Context
  • Key Spheres in Which to Establish Historical Context
  • Shared Assumptions and the Bible’s Clarity
  • Engaging Historical Context Errors and Guidelines
  • The Historical Context of 1 Samuel 13:14
  • Geographical Details in Deuteronomy 1:1
  • The Historical Context of Exodus 19:4–6
Unit 9: Literary Context
  • Grasping Literary Context
  • The Theological Message of Each OT Book (The OT in Ten Minutes)
  • The Literary Flow of Psalms
  • Psalm 121 in Its Literary Context
  • Flow of Thought in the Book of the Twelve
  • The Literary Context of Exodus 19:4–6: Part 1
  • The Literary Context of Exodus 19:4–6: Part 2
Unit 10: Biblical Theology
  • The Presuppositions of Biblical Theology: Part 1
  • The Presuppositions of Biblical Theology: Part 2
  • Biblical Theology’s Task
  • Biblical Theology and Salvation-Historical Connections: Part 1
  • Biblical Theology and Salvation-Historical Connections: Part 2
  • Biblical Theology and Literary-Canonical Connections
  • Biblical Theology and the Relationship of the Testaments
  • Biblical Theology and the Centrality of Christ
  • The Bible’s Frame, Form, Focus, and Fulcrum
  • The Kingdom of Priests in Exodus 19:4–6 and Redemptive History: Part 1
  • The Kingdom of Priests in Exodus 19:4–6 and Redemptive History: Part 2
Unit 11: Systematic Theology
  • What Is Systematic Theology?
  • Systematic Theology and Exodus 19:4–6: Soteriology
  • Systematic Theology and Exodus 19:4–6: Missiology
  • Ecclesiology and Eschatology in Zephaniah 3:9–10
Unit 12: Pastoral Theology
  • The Importance and Challenge of Applying the OT
  • Reasons the OT Is Still Important
  • The OT Was Written for Christians: Part 1
  • The OT Was Written for Christians: Part 2
  • Guidelines for Application with a Look at Exodus 19:4–6: Part 1
  • Guidelines for Application with a Look at Exodus 19:4–6: Part 2
  • The Christian and OT Law
  • Establishing the Law’s Relevance for Christians
  • Assessing the Threefold Division of the Law
  • Guidelines for Applying OT Law
  • House Building with Love in Deuteronomy 22:8
  • Gender Confusion in Deuteronomy 22:5
  • Keeping the Sabbath in Deuteronomy 5:12: Part 1
  • Keeping the Sabbath in Deuteronomy 5:12: Part 2
  • The Christian and OT Promises
  • The Challenge and Necessity of Applying OT Promises to Christians
  • Guidelines for the Christian’s Application of OT Promises: Part 1
  • Guidelines for the Christian’s Application of OT Promises: Part 2
  • Kept in Perfect Peace in Isaiah 26:3: Part 1
  • Kept in Perfect Peace in Isaiah 26:3: Part 2
  • Preaching Christ and the Gospel from the OT

BI206 New Testament Exegesis: Understanding and Applying the New Testament

  • Instructor: Andy Naselli
  • Video Hours: 14

When people interpret the Bible, even though they may have the best motives in the world, they can still read their ideas into the Bible rather than draw out what the author originally intended to mean. Don’t miss the whole point of exegesis. It’s to know and worship God. Dr. Naselli will help you exegete the New Testament texts in a way that spreads a passion for the supremacy of God in all things for the joy of all peoples through Jesus Christ by exploring the concepts of genre, theology, translation, and much more. Exegesis and theology are thrilling because they help you know and worship God, and only God satisfies.

Contents:

Unit 1: Introduction to Exegesis and Theology
  • What Is Exegesis?
  • Twelve Steps for Exegesis and Theology
  • How Do Exegesis and Theology Interrelate?
  • Which Is More Valuable: 10 minutes of Prayer or 10 Hours of Study?
  • Why You Should Organize Your Personal Theological Library and a Way How
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 2: Genre: Establish Rules for Interpreting a Passage’s Style of Literature
  • Why Start with Genre Instead of Textual Criticism?
  • What Are Some General Principles for Interpreting the Bible?
  • How Should We Interpret Figures of Speech?
  • What Genres Are the Gospels and Acts, and How Do They Relate to Each Other?
  • How Should We Interpret the Gospels and Acts?
  • How Should We Interpret Jesus’ Parables?
  • Example: The Parable of the Prodigal Son
  • How Should We Interpret the Epistles?
  • How Should We Interpret Revelation?
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 3: Textual Criticism: Establish the Original Wording
  • What Is Textual Criticism?
  • How Should You Evaluate Variant Readings?
  • What about the KJV-Only View?
  • Example: “If I Deliver Up My Body That I May Boast” vs “If I Deliver Up My Body to Be Burned”
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 4: Translation: Translate the Greek Text and Compare Other Translations
  • Four Qualities That Make a Translation Excellent
  • Three Main Approaches to Translation
  • How Do Contemporary English Bible Versions Compare?
  • Are the NASB and ESV Always More Formal Than the NIV?
  • How to Disagree about Bible Translation Philosophy
  • What to Do Instead of Bickering about Which Bible Translation Is the Best: Part 1
  • What to Do Instead of Bickering about Which Bible Translation Is the Best: Part 2
  • Translating Figurative Language and Cultural Issues
  • The Importance of Dignified Translations
  • Translating with Gender Accuracy
  • Footnotes in Bible Translations
  • Three Examples: Matthew 6:34, Romans 11:33, and 1 Corinthians 7:1
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 5: Greek Grammar: Words, Phrases, and Clauses
  • What Are the Basics of Greek Grammar? (Part 1)
  • What Are the Basics of Greek Grammar? (Part 2)
  • Identifying and Analyzing Exegetically Significant Words, Phrases, and Clauses
  • Analyzing the Nominative Case
  • Analyzing the Genitive Case
  • Analyzing the Dative Case
  • Analyzing the Accusative Case
  • Analyzing Articles
  • Analyzing Verbal Aspect
  • Analyzing Infinitives
  • Analyzing Participles: Part 1
  • Analyzing Participles: Part 2
  • Analyzing Antecedents of Pronouns
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 6: Argument Diagram: Trace the Logical Argument by Arcing, Bracketing, or Phrasing
  • Why Tracing the Argument Is the Best Part about Knowing Greek
  • How Do Propositions Relate to Each Other?
  • Tracing the Argument with an Argument Diagram: Arcing, Bracketing, and Phrasing
  • Eight Steps for Phrasing
  • Why Phrasing Is My Favorite Method for Tracing the Argument
  • Example: Phrasing Peter
  • Example: Phrasing Matthew
  • Example: Phrasing Jude
  • Example: Phrasing Romans
  • Example: Phrasing Colossians
  • Example: Phrasing Romans
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 7: Historical-Cultural Context: Authorship
  • Is “Background Information” Ever Necessary to Understand the Bible?
  • Two Examples Where “Background Information” Is Necessary to Understand the Bible
  • If “Background Information” Is Necessary to Understand the Bible, Does that Mean that the Bible Isn’t Sufficiently Clear?
  • Analyzing the Historical-Cultural Context of a New Testament Book or Passage
  • Mirror Reading: Good and Necessary but Dangerous
  • What Primary Resources Should You Use to Understand the Historical-Cultural Context?
  • Six Ways to Use Jewish and Graeco-Roman Resources Responsibly
  • Example: “It Is Easier for a Camel to Go through the Eye of a Needle” (Matt 19:24)
  • Example: Rhetoric in 1 Corinthians 2:1–5
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 8: Literary Context: Understand the Role a Passage Plays in Its Whole Book
  • What Are the Different Levels of the Literary Context?
  • Theological Message of Each Book in the New Testament: The New Testament in 10 minutes
  • Four Practical Suggestions for Reading the New Testament in Its Literary Context
  • How to Memorize an Entire New Testament Book and Why
  • Example: “Judge Not, That You Be Not Judged” (Matt 7:1)
  • Example: “I Can Do All Things through Him Who Strengthens Me” (Phil 4:13)
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 9: Word Studies: Unpack Key words, Phrases, and Concepts
  • Why Are Word Studies Important?
  • Four Steps for Doing a Word Study
  • Four Common Dangers to Avoid When Doing Word Studies: Part 1
  • Four Common Dangers to Avoid When Doing Word Studies: Part 2
  • A Thought Experiment on Poor Commentaries
  • Example: συνείδησις (Conscience)
  • Example: σάρξ and πνεῦμα (Flesh and Spirit)
  • Example: μὴ γένοιτο (God Forbid!)
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 10: Biblical Theology: Integration of the Old and New Testaments
  • You Are Here: A Quick Reminder of Where We Are on the Exegetical-Theological Map
  • What Is Biblical Theology?: Part 1
  • What Is Biblical Theology?: Part 2
  • Illustration: Harry Potter and Some Other Stories
  • Example: Holiness
  • Example: Temple (1 Cor 6:19–20)
  • Example: Mystery (Eph 3:1–6)
  • Example: Work
  • Motivation to Do Biblical Theology
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 11: Historical Theology: Study of Significant Exegetes and Theologians
  • What Is Historical Theology, and Who Are Some of the Most Significant Exegetes and Theologians?
  • Ten Reasons to Study Historical Theology: Part 1
  • Ten Reasons to Study Historical Theology: Part 2
  • Example: Keswick Theology
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 12: Systematic Theology: Discern How a Passage Theologically Coheres with the Whole Bible
  • What Is Systematic Theology?
  • Ten Corresponding Strengths and Dangers of Systematic Theology: Part 1
  • Ten Corresponding Strengths and Dangers of Systematic Theology: Part 2
  • Ten Corresponding Strengths and Dangers of Systematic Theology: Part 3
  • Ten Corresponding Strengths and Dangers of Systematic Theology: Part 4
  • Example: What Is the Gospel?
  • Example: The Logical Problem of Evil
  • Resources for Further Study
Unit 13: Practical Theology: Apply the Text to Yourself, the Church, and the World
  • What Is Practical Theology?
  • Six Guidelines for Applying the Bible: Part 1
  • Six Guidelines for Applying the Bible: Part 2
  • Six Guidelines for Applying the Bible: Part 3
  • Six Guidelines for Applying the Bible: Part 4
  • Example: How Paul Uses Isaiah and Job in Romans 11:34–35
  • Example: How Should You Work?
  • Resources for Further Study

Product Details

About the Instructors

Jason S. DeRouchie received his PhD at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and is associate professor of Old Testament at Bethlehem College and Seminary. He is coauthor of A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew and A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew: Workbook.

Andy Naselli serves as Assistant Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology. He teaches courses primarily at the seminary-level on Greek exegesis, New Testament, biblical theology, and systematic theology. He loves to study and teach how the theological disciplines (exegesis, biblical theology, historical theology, systematic theology, and practical theology) interrelate and culminate in doxology.

Andy earned two PhDs before he turned thirty: a PhD in theology from Bob Jones University and a PhD in New Testament Exegesis and Theology from Trinity Evangelical Divinity School under D. A. Carson. He served as Carson’s research assistant from 2006 to 2013 and continues to work with him on various projects, including the theological journal Themelios, for which Carson is editor and Andy is administrator.

Prior to coming to the Bethlehem College & Seminary in 2013, Andy taught New Testament Greek at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and he continues to teach Bible and theology as adjunct faculty at several other seminaries.

Andy and his wife, Jenni, have been married since 2004, and God has blessed them with three girls.

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