Products>The Works of John Owen, Vol. 2: On Communion with God

The Works of John Owen, Vol. 2: On Communion with God

Format: Digital
Publisher:
, 1851
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Overview

One of his greatest works, John Owen draws from clear, Biblical exposition to outline the place of the Trinity in Christian doctrine and practice. Owen examines the doctrine of the Trinity and its centrality in Christian orthodoxy, and he counters rationalist skeptics and mystic opponents.

Key Features

  • Outlines place of the Trinity in Christian practice
  • Answers opponents' view of the Trinity

Contents

  • Vindication of the Preceding Discourse
  • Vindication of the Doctrine of the Trinity

Praise for the Author

For solidity, profundity, massiveness and majesty in exhibiting from Scripture God’s ways with sinful mankind there is no one to touch him.

J. I. Packer, author

To have known the pastoral ministry of John Owen . . . (albeit in written form) has been a rich privilege; to have known Owen’s God an even greater one.

—Sinclair Ferguson, professor, Redeemer Seminary, Dallas, Texas

John [Owen], English theologian, was without doubt not only the greatest theologian of the English Puritan movement but also one of the greatest European Reformed theologians of his day, and quite possibly possessed the finest theological mind that England ever produced.

—C. R. Trueman

Product Details

  • Title: The Works of John Owen, Vol. 2: On Communion with God
  • Author: John Owen
  • Series: The Works of John Owen
  • Publisher: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 454

About John Owen

John Owen was born at Stadhampton, Oxfordshire in 1616. He entered Queen's College, Oxford, at the age of twelve and completed his M.A. in classics and theology in 1635 at the age of nineteen. He was ordained shortly thereafter and left the university to be a chaplain to the family of a noble lord. His first parish, in 1637, was at Fordham in Essex, to which he went while England was involved in civil war. It was here that he became convinced that the Congregational way was the scriptural form of church government. In the 1640s he became chaplain to Oliver Cromwell, the new "Protector of England," and traveled with him on his expeditions to Ireland and Scotland. Between 1651 and 1660, he played a prominent part in the religious, political, and academic life of the nation. In 1651 he was appointed dean of Christ Church and in 1652 made Vice-Chancellor of Oxford—positions which allowed him to train ministers for the Cromwellian state church. He lost his position in 1660, however, when the restoration of the monarchy began after the death of Cromwell in 1658. Owen moved to London and led the Puritans through the bitter years of religious and political persecution—experiences which shaped his theological inquiry, pastoral reflection, and preaching. He also declined invitations to the ministry in Boston in 1663, and declined an offer to become president of Harvard in 1670. He died in August, 1683.

Sample Pages from the Print Edition