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Notes, Critical and Practical, on the Book of Leviticus
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Notes, Critical and Practical, on the Book of Leviticus

by

5 publishers 1852

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$16.95

Overview

Following the scope of regulation and law in Leviticus, Bush provides concise annotation, exegesis, and practical exposition of the original Hebrew. Bush compares Leviticus with alternative Old Testament books to show variable meaning in grammar and semantic thought.

With Logos Bible Software, this volume is completely searchable, with passages of Scripture appearing on mouse-over, as well as being linked to the Greek and Hebrew texts and English translations in your library. This makes the text more powerful and easier to access than ever before for scholarly work or personal Bible study. With the advanced search features of Logos Bible Software, you can perform powerful searches by topic or Scripture reference—finding, for example, every mention of “sacrifice” or “Leviticus 16:1.”

Key Features

  • Compares Leviticus with other Old Testament text
  • Analyzes the composition and organization of the book
  • Provides verse-by-verse commentary

Praise for the Print Edition

This volume strikes us, on a cursory perusal, as equal to any of its predecessors, in learning, ingenuity and force of style, while it is certainly superior to some of them in conciseness of style and soundness of judgment.

The Bible Repertory and Princeton Review

Product Details

  • Title: Notes, Critical and Practical, on the Book of Leviticus
  • Author: George Bush
  • Publisher: Newman and Ivison
  • Publication Date: 1852
  • Pages: 284

About George Bush

George Bush (1796–1859) was educated at Dartmouth and Princeton before being ordained in the Presbyterian Church. Bush later went on to become professor of Hebrew and Oriental literature at New York University.