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The Life and Epistles of St. Paul (2 vols.)

by Conybeare, W. J., Howson, J. S.

Charles Scribner’s Sons 1893

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The Life and Epistles of St. Paul (2 vols.) See inside
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Overview

Conybeare and Howson's study on The Life and Epistles of St. Paul is one of the most significant contributions to Pauline scholarship to date. Published over 150 years ago, this work still impacts the way New Testament scholars view the 1st century Christian world. Containing a wealth of historical and context-specific knowledge, The Life and Epistles of St. Paul is a necessary addition to the library of any New Testament student.

NOTE: This work has been reprinted and distributed by Eerdmans Publishers. The edition for sale here is not the Eerdmans edition, otherwise known as the People's Edition. The 2 volume set we feature here contains Conybeare and Howson's original footnotes, complete with Greek and Hebrew quotations, which were abridged in later editions.

Benefits of the Electronic Edition

Adding The Life and Epistles of St. Paul to your electronic library means you will gain access to one of the most respected historical and biographical works on the life of the Apostle Paul. A standout at the time of its original release, this work is still incredibly useful for studying the life and works of Paul by gaining a better understanding of the man and the the 1st century Roman world he lived in.

An excellent source of historical scholarship, The Life and Epistles of St. Paul brings the scriptures of Acts and the New Testament Epistles written by Paul into context of the events in the life of Paul. This gives the scholar the ability to engage these biblical texts with a greater knowledge of context and perspective of the world Paul lived in, allowing them to analyze his writing with greater depth and accuracy.

In addition to these great benefits, Logos is pleased to offer the original text in electronic form. This includes many footnotes from the authors that were abridged in later publications of this work. By resurrecting the "lost" notes of Conybeare and Howson, we are able to provide you with a more complete resource.

Praise for the Print Edition

All other books on Paul, while of value in one way or another, must take second place when compared to this one.

—Wilbur M. Smith

It will be readily seen how valuable an auxiliary the present work will be in giving a fuller understanding of the character and writings of the great apostle of the Gentiles.

—John H. Bennetch, Bibliotheca Sacra

Product Details

  • Title: The Life and Epistles of St. Paul
  • Authors: W. J. Conybeare and J. S. Howson
  • Publisher: Logos Research Systems, Inc.
  • Originally Published: 1851

About the Authors

William John Conybeare (August 1, 1815 - 1857), English divine, son of Dean WD Conybeare, was educated at Westminster and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was elected fellow in 1837. From 1842 to 1848 he was principal of the Liverpool Collegiate Institution, which he left for the vicarage of Axminster. He published Essays, Ecclesiastical and Social, in 1856, and a novel, Perversion, or the Causes and Consequences of Infidelity, but is best known as the joint author (with J.S. Howson) of The Life and Epistles of St. Paul (1851). He died at Weybridge in 1857.

John Saul Howson (May 5, 1816-1885), English divine, was born at Giggleswick-on-Craven, Yorkshire. After receiving his early education at Giggleswick School, of which his father was head-master, he went to Trinity College, Cambridge, and there became tutor successively to the marquess of Sligo and the marquess of Lorne. In 1845 Howson, having taken orders, accepted the post of senior classical master at the Liverpool College under his friend W.J. Conybeare, whom he succeeded as principal in 1849.

[Howson's] sympathies were with the evangelical party, and he stoutly opposed the "Eastward position," but he was by no means narrow. He did much to reintroduce the ministry of women as deaconesses. The building of the King's School for boys, and the Queen's School for girls (both in Chester), was due in a great measure to the active interest which he took in educational matters. He died at Bournemouth on the December 15, 1885, and was buried in the cloister garth of Chester.

Both biographies excerpted from Wikipedia.

Sample Pages from the Print Edition