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Naming the Powers: The Language of Power in the New Testament

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Overview

The reader of this work will search in vain for a definition of power. It is one of those words that everyone understands perfectly well until asked to define it. Our use of the term ‘power’ is laden with assumptions drawn from the contemporary materialistic worldview. Whereas the ancients always understood power as the confluence of both spiritual and material factors, we tend to see it as primarily material. We do not think in terms of spirits, ghosts, demons, or gods as the effective agents of powerful effects in the world.

Thus a gulf has been fixed between us and the biblical writers. We use the same words but project them into a wholly different world of meanings. What they meant by power and what we mean are incommensurate. If our goal is to understand the New Testament’s conception of the Powers, we cannot do so simply by applying our own modern sociological categories of power. We must instead attend carefully and try to grasp what the people of that time might have meant by power, within the linguistic field of their own worldview and mythic systems.

I will argue that the “principalities and powers” are the inner and outer aspects of any given manifestation of power. As the inner aspect they are the spirituality of institutions, the “within” of corporate structures and systems, the inner essence of outer organizations of power. As the outer aspect they are political systems, appointed officials, the “chair” of an organization, laws—in short, all the tangible manifestations which power takes. This hypothesis, it seems to me, makes sense of the fluid way the New Testament writers and their contemporaries spoke of the Powers, now as if they were these centurions or that priestly hierarchy, and then, with no warning, as if they were some kind of spiritual entities in the heavenly places.

  • Explores the language of power in the New Testament
  • Examines the use of the terms for power in all the relevant literature of the period and in the New Testament
  • Presents a consistent interpretation of the meaning of the biblical language of power for human existence, then and now

Identifying the Powers

  • Introduction
  • The Powers

The Disputed Passages

  • The New Testament Evidence

Interpreting the PowerR

  • Toward an Interpretation
  • Interpreting the Myth
The pages of this book represent the quest of a man intent on discerning the nature of structural evil in light of the biblical evidence. His experience of living for a time in Latin American and witnessing extensive social and political oppression appears to have moved him profoundly. The end result is a book that is a model of the attempt to integrate scholarship with faith.

—Clinton E. Arnold, Catalyst

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Walter Wink was Professor of Biblical Interpretation Emeritus at Auburn Theological Seminary in New York City. Previously, he was a parish minister and taught at Union Theological Seminary in New York City. In 1989–90 he was a Peace Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace.

Walter Wink was author of The Human Being: Jesus and the Enigma of the Son of the Man (Fortress Press, 2001) and the award-winning Fortress Press books: Naming the Powers (1982), Unmasking the Powers (1986), Engaging the Powers (1992), and When the Powers Fall (1998). He was also the editor of Homosexuality and Christian Faith (Fortress Press, 1999).

$12.99

Save $7.00 (35%)
Reg:$19.99

In production