Register
Logos Bible Software
Cart
Advanced

How to Write a Greek or Hebrew Word Study Paper

Writing a paper on a biblical word can feel overwhelming at first, but it doesn’t have to. We’ve outlined essential steps for writing a paper that demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of a Greek or Hebrew word—and its significance for biblical interpretation.

This overview is based on the Word Study (Original Languages) Workflow that is built right into Logos Bible Software.

Learn more

Research Biblical Word Usage

Once you’ve chosen a word for your word study, you need to examine word usage. There are three steps you’ll need to take to accomplish this:

Rick Warren’s Bible Study Methods
Rick Warren’s Bible Study Methods

Make no mistake, Rick Warren is a down-to-earth preacher. But this resource includes a clear, helpful chapter on how to do Bible word studies. It’s perfect for anybody writing their first paper on a Greek or Hebrew word.

Learn more
Exegetical Fallacies, Second Edition
Exegetical Fallacies, Second Edition

As Faithlife’s own Dr. Mark Ward often says, word studies are both a gold mine and a minefield. It’s so tempting to attribute too much significance to your interpretation of a biblical word. D. A. Carson’s classic resources will help you avoid the mines and get to the gold.

Learn more

Consult Commentaries for Lemma Discussion

Commentaries often discuss key terms or important words in the context of the passage where they occur. Since these discussions are focused on a specific passage, they may provide useful, in-depth information on how the word is used in that passage.

You can find where commentaries discuss your word in one of two ways:

Evangelical Exegetical Commentary Series
Evangelical Exegetical Commentary Series

D. A. Carson called one volume in this series the best technical commentary on Ephesians. That’s high praise from the guy who literally wrote the book on avoiding exegetical fallacies! You could do worse than stocking your digital commentary shelf with this set. It’s filled to the brim with in-depth discussions on the original languages.

Learn more

Compare Early Extrabiblical Sources

Ancient believers weren’t the only ones to write Greek and Hebrew. That’s why if you want to truly understand the significance of Greek and Hebrew words, you have to go outside the Bible to other contemporary literature. For example, comparing usages of your word in ancient Greek resources by the Apostlic Fathers will give you a much better sense of the word’s range of meanings.

The Hermeneutical Spiral
The Hermeneutical Spiral

This book has been hugely influential on a generation of scholars and Bible expositors. And if you’re taking your study of original languages seriously, it isn’t optional reading. It includes a helpful discussion on the benefits of comparing extrabiblical sources.

Learn more

Record and Share Observations

Naturally, you’ll be recording notes and keeping track of your source material for when you build your bibliography. Some students prefer paper notes, while others rely on digital note apps for this step in the process. Logos comes with a built-in note-taking system that was created with studying the Bible in mind. Notes stick to the passage or word your studying so you always know where to find it. Logos will even build your bibliography for you.

<
Elements of Biblical Exegesis: A Basic Guide for Students and Ministers
Elements of Biblical Exegesis: A Basic Guide for Students and Ministers

A distinguished professor demystifies the process of writing exegetical papers. He breaks it all down into seven stages which you’ll find yourself following to again and again, whether you go into ministry or academia.

Learn more

Conclusion

There’s lots more that goes into writing an effective paper on a biblical word. But if you follow the steps above, you’ll be well on your way to writing a paper that not only helps you better understand God’s Word—it also might just earn you an A, too.