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Get into Genesis with the Lexham Bible Guides

We all wish we could buy time, even just a few hours to get a project done. With the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, pastors can essentially do just that.

From creation through the patriarch narratives, the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection empowers you to interpret some of the most difficult and important chapters of the Bible. Both volumes prepare you to immerse yourself in passages you’ve read dozens of times—and walk away with entirely new insights.

The Lexham Bible Guides direct you to the best commentaries for the subject you’re researching. The Genesis Collection offers a complete introduction to each literary unit of the book, keeping you focused and helping you conduct more thorough research in a fraction of the time you usually spend hunting through commentaries on your own. You’ll also get an overview of the each passage’s structure, its place within Genesis and within the canon, major issues within the passage, key word studies, and an application to help you make this degree of research relevant for your faith community.

You already know that commentators hold a variety of views on God’s acceptance of Abel’s offering and not Cain’s. With the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, you’ll get an overview of those opinions, with definitions of original-language words and links to commentaries that explore each standpoint in depth. Take a look at an excerpt:

The Offerings of Cain and Abel

The reason God favored Abel’s offering and not Cain’s remains a matter of debate. Both men brought offerings related to their vocation. Some commentators contend that this passage reflects a preference for blood sacrifice. Others argue that the narrator gives no clues as to God’s preference for one offering over the other. This latter view regards God’s sovereignty and divine election as responsible. Another interpretation, based on Heb 11:4, suggests that God preferred Abel’s offering because Abel demonstrated a righteous motivation in worship where Cain did not. The most common view, however, explains that God rejected Cain’s offering because of its quality. Abel offered the “firstborn” (bekhorah) of his flock (Gen 4:4); Cain failed to offer the “firstfruits” (bikkurim) of his yield (Gen 4:2; compare Exod 23:19).

  • Walter Brueggemann calls God’s preference for Abel’s offering inexplicable and recommends that interpreters resist the temptation to explain what the narrator leaves unexplained. He argues that the freedom of God is the main point.
  • Kenneth A. Mathews contends that a flaw in Cain’s intention prompted God’s rejection. He argues that God rejected the integrity of the giver, not the nature of the offering.
  • John Skinner argues that God’s preference for Abel’s offering reflects a preference for animal offerings over vegetable offerings.
  • Bruce Waltke examines the interpretive options, concluding that God rejected Cain’s offering because Cain did not bring the best of his harvest, revealing that he was not dependent on God.

How much time would you have invested in finding these resources on your own? Why do the work when Logos has already done it for you?

When you purchase the two-volume Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 1–11 will download immediately. Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 will download when it is released. Get yours today!

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Written by
Rebecca Brant

Rebecca Brant is an award-winning marketing communications specialist with more than 20 years’ experience in writing, editing, and publications management.

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Written by Rebecca Brant