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This volume contains an introductory essay on the progress of Christianity in the third century, and also covers the following figures and their written works: Irenaeus of Lyons, Hippolytus of Rome, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Gregory Thaumaturgus, Tertullian, Cyprian of Carthage, and a number of other Greek and Latin writers.

Author Bios

Irenaeus of Lyons

Saint Irenaeus, (2nd century AD – c. 202) was Bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul, then a part of the Roman Empire. He was an early church father and apologist, and his writings were formative in the early development of Christian theology. He was a hearer of Polycarp, who in turn was a disciple of John the Evangelist. Irenaeus’ best-known book, Adversus Haereses or Against Heresies (c.

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Hippolytus of Rome

Hippolytus of Rome (170 – 235) was the most important 3rd-century theologian in the Christian Church in Rome, where he was probably born. Photios I of Constantinople describes him in his Bibliotheca (cod. 121) as a disciple of Irenaeus, who was said to be a disciple of Polycarp, and from the context of this passage it is supposed that he suggested that Hippolytus himself so styled himself. However, this assertion is doubtful.

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Origen of Alexandria

Origen of Alexandria

Origen of Alexandria (ca. 182–ca. 251) was a Christian scholar and presbyter in the third century. He is thought to have been born at Alexandria, and died at Caesarea.

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Tertullian

Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicised as Tertullian (c. 160–c. 220 AD), was a prolific early Christian author from Carthage in the Roman province of Africa. He is the first Christian author to produce an extensive corpus of Latin Christian literature. He also was a notable early Christian apologist and a polemicist against heresy. Tertullian has been called “the father of Latin Christianity” and “the founder of Western theology.

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