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T&T Clark Old Testament Studies Bundle (72 vols.)
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T&T Clark Old Testament Studies Bundle (72 vols.)

by 106 authors

T&T Clark 2011–2015

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Overview

This massive bundle from T&T Clark covers a broad range of Old Testament topics with focused academic research from a global cast of today’s top scholars. These scholars offer their expertise as they approach the Old Testament from the academic disciplines of theology, history, literature, and linguistics.

This set contains many of the most recent volumes from T&T Clark’s premier series—the Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS). For four decades, this series has earned a reputation for its innovative, cutting-edge contributions to Old Testament scholarship. The collection also includes volumes from several of the publisher’s other groundbreaking series—including T&T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies, The Library of Second Temple Studies, The Library of Biblical Studies, and T&T Clark Cornerstones.

In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

For even more titles in the Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies series, check out Library of Hebrew Bible / Old Testament Studies.

Key Features

  • Includes more than 20,000 pages of the latest in Old Testament scholarship
  • Examines key Old Testament topics, themes, debates, problems, and more
  • Provides in-depth, focused studies on a wide variety of themes
  • Offers many unique insights for those seeking to delve deeper into Bible study

Product Details

Individual Titles

Legitimacy, Illegitimacy, and the Right to Rule: Windows on Abimelech’s Rise and Demise in Judges 9

  • Author: Gordon K. Oeste
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book explores the portrayal of the rise, reign, and demise of Abimelech in Judges 9 and asks whose interests this portrayal may have served. The negative depiction of Abimelech’s kingship in this chapter, coupled with Gideon’s rejection of kingship in Judges 8:22–23, has led interpreters to view the passage as anti-monarchic. This perspective clashes with the pro-monarchic stance of Judges 17–21. However, while the portrayal of Abimelech’s kingship is negative, it may yet have served as a legitimation strategy for the monarchy. In support, this study examines Judges 9 through three methodological lenses: a narrative analysis, a rhetorical analysis, and a social-scientific analysis.

In addition, anthropological data on early and developing states shows that such states attempt to prevent fissioning (the tendency inherent within political systems to break up and form similar units) by subverting local leaders, groups, and institutions, thus legitimizing the centralization of power. When read in this light, Judges 9 supports monarchic interests by seeking to subvert localized rule and alliances in favor of a centralized polity.

[The book’s] strong attempt to weld three methodologies together is to be commended and copied. Its emphasis on attempts at delegitimization of Abimelech is welcome. Its search for an implied audience early in Israel’s history joins the work of several of us in seeking a wholeness to Judges directed to the early monarchy. Showing how each method may point to this setting for the book is commendable . . . Welcome Gordon Oeste into the guild of Judges scholars by reading his book and providing helpful critique that will push the study of Judges further through use of every available methodology.

Review of Biblical Literature

. . . a refreshing and valuable contribution to the study of the story of Abimelech. Indeed, the time may come when O[este]’s book will be counted among the seminal publications that paved the way toward recovering a measure of consistency in the political agenda of Judges.

Catholic Biblical Quarterly

Gordon Oeste is an associate professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Heritage Theological Seminary in Cambridge, Ontario.

Crossing the Jordan: Diachrony Versus Synchrony in the Book of Joshua

  • Author: Eun-Woo Lee
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 193

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book presents a test case for diachronic and synchronic approaches in Joshua 3–4. Lee introduces the synchronic readings of Polzin, Hawk, and Winther-Nielsen, as well as their attempts to uncover the problems in applying their methods to this complicated text. He then investigates the differences between the MT and the LXX of Joshua 3–4 through text critical analysis and reconstructs the LXX’s Hebrew Vorlage of Joshua 3–4, considering divergences between major Greek editions, and examines the limitations of Polzin’s synchronic study in reading only from the final text of the MT. For the purpose of reading the literary history of Joshua 3–4 in a diachronic way, Lee considers what position this text holds in the setting of the wider context of the ark narratives and water crossing stories in the Old Testament, e.g. the crossing of the Red Sea in Exodus 13:17–14:31 and with Elijah and Elisha crossing the river in 2 kings 2. He examines the recent trends in literary criticism and attempts to trace the most probable literary history of Joshua 3–4.

Eun-Woo Lee is professor at Presbyterian College and Theological Seminary in Seoul, Korea.

Juxtaposition and the Elisha Cycle

  • Author: Rachelle Gilmour
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

This monograph examines the juxtaposition of narrative units in biblical narrative and the effect this has on interpretation. Early rabbinical and inner-biblical interpretations suggest that juxtaposition was an intentional device used by biblical editors and authors to shape the meaning of their material. Therefore, this monograph develops a framework for recognizing the ways in which adjacent units interpret and reinterpret one another and presents this framework as an important hermeneutical tool. Stories and episodes that are linked chronologically affect one another through a relationship of causes and consequences.

The categories of contradiction, corroboration, and question and answer are also used to describe the types of interaction between narrative units and demonstrate how such dialogues create new meaning. Indicators in the text that guide the audience towards the intended interpretation are identified in order that a “poetics” of juxtaposition is developed. The theoretical basis established in the first half of the monograph is then applied to the Elisha cycle. Each episode is interpreted independently and then read in juxtaposition with the surrounding episodes, producing a fresh literary reading of the cycle.

Furthermore, in order to demonstrate how juxtaposition functioned as a diachronic process, attention is given to the literary history of the cycle. Gilmour reconstructs earlier interpretations of the Elisha episodes and compares them to the final form of the cycle. Finally, the Elisha cycle is itself a story juxtaposed with other stories, so the same principles of interpretation are used to suggest the meaning of the cycle within the book of Kings.

Rachelle Gilmour received her PhD from the University of Sydney and is a postdoctoral fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the author of Representing the Past: A Literary Analysis of Narrative Historiography in the Book of Samuel.

An Introduction to the Study of Isaiah

  • Author: Jacob Stromberg
  • Series: T&T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 160

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This volume provides an accessible, yet comprehensive, introduction to the book of Isaiah from one of the foremost experts on this book of the Hebrew Bible. Stromberg uses a commonly accepted delineation to structure his presentation of the book into first, second, and third Isaiah and introduces them each in turn. He then presents and discusses the literary approaches that have been applied to Isaiah and offers a method of reading Isaiah holistically. Finally, Stormberg rounds out this helpful introduction by discussing various approaches to and aspects of Isaianic theology.

Jacob Stromberg is one of the leading young experts on Isaiah today. As this introduction confirms, he is also one of its foremost teachers. Stromberg brings the breadth and depth of his learning to bear on this, the most complex book in the Hebrew Bible, unfolding its secrets to a new generation of students and scholars. Leading his readers with ease through the labyrinth of modern studies on the book, Stromberg keeps his eye firmly fixed on the most central compositional and theological issues at play. He consistently proves himself a reliable and sure-footed guide. He writes with clarity and accessibility, without falling into reductionism. What is more, Stromberg’s articulation of Isaiah’s multifaceted, intertwined theological arguments is a remarkable achievement, lucid and graceful. This is without doubt the best introduction to Isaiah in English.

—William A. Tooman, lecturer in Hebrew Bible, University of St. Andrews

A comprehensive and well-researched look at present Isaiah studies, with reflections on the practice of reading this challenging, composite work. Clearly and competently set forth, An Introduction to the Study of Isaiah does what its title says.

Christopher Seitz, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto, Canada

Jacob Stromberg earned his DPhil from the University of Oxford and is a lecturer at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the author of Isaiah after Exile: the Author of Third Isaiah as Reader and Redactor of the Book.

The Characterization of the Assyrians in Isaiah: Synchronic and Diachronic Perspectives

  • Author: Mary Katherine Y.H. Hom
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 256

The Characterization of the Assyrians in Isaiah is a literary analysis of every text in Isaiah which explicitly or implicitly features the Assyrians. In addition, a few texts regarded by dominant voices in scholarship as referring to the Assyrians are discussed. The general approach of this work is to assume a literary synchronic reading in order to appreciate the narrative artistry and meaning conveyed by the final form of the text and to establish a standard from which diachronic inquiry may proceed.

Each chapter is a study in its own right, usually concentrating on a passage or chapter of Isaiah. In addition to analyzing the role of the Assyrians from both synchronic and diachronic perspectives, these chapters also explore the sophisticated ways by which literary devices function in relation to the depiction of the Assyrians.

Hom has successfully put forth an exegetical journey of the characterizations of the Assyrians in Isaiah. Her writing is clear, her arguments are cogent, and her exegesis is solid. The volume would be of great use to students of Assyriology and of Isaiah and the prophets, or even of biblical history in general.

Reviews in Religion & Theology

Mary Katherine Y.H. Hom earned her PhD from the University of Cambridge and has taught biblical studies at Ambrose University College. She has lectured and taught in numerous countries and contributed to various scholarly journals.

Prophecy and Power: Jeremiah in Feminist and Postcolonial Perspective

  • Editors: Christl M. Maier, Carolyn J. Sharp
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

This volume advances the scholarly discussion of Jeremiah via rigorous feminist and postcolonialist theorizing of texts and interpretive issues. The essays here, by seasoned scholars of Jeremiah, offer significant traction on the biblical book’s construction of the persona of Jeremiah and the subjectivity of Judah as subaltern, analysis of gendered imagery for the speaking subject in Jeremiah and for the Judean social body, exploration of rhetorics of imperialism and resistance, and theological implications of feminist-critical perspectives on YHWH and other deities represented in Jeremiah.

Essays here deftly synthesize historical, literary, and ideological-critical insights in service of nuanced inquiry into Jeremiah as a complex cultural production. The collection represents the recent development of international critical thinking on Jeremiah. It should prove invaluable in shaping the parameters of the continuing scholarly conversation on the Book of Jeremiah.

Christi M. Maier is professor of Old Testament at Philipps-University in Marburg, Germany.

Carolyn J. Sharp is professor of Hebrew Scriptures at Yale Divinity School and is the author of Prophecy and Ideology in Jeremiah: Struggles for Authority in the Deutero-Jeremianic Prose.

Empire and Exile: Postcolonial Readings of the Book of Jeremiah

  • Author: Steed Vernyl Davidson
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

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Empire and Exile explores the impact of Babylonian aggression upon the book of Jeremiah by calling attention to the presence of the empire and showing how the book of Jeremiah can be read as resistant responses to the inevitability of imperial power and the experience of exile. Utilizing postcolonial theory, resistance is framed in these readings as finding a place in the world, even without controlling territory, and therefore surviving social death. It argues that even though exile is not prevented, exile is experienced in the constituting of a unique place in the world rather than in the assimilation of the nation.

The insights of postcolonial theory direct this reading of the book of Jeremiah from the perspective of the displaced. Theorists Homi Bhabha, Partha Chatterjee, Stuart Hall, and Bell Hooks provide lenses to read issues peculiar to groups affected by dominant powers such as empires. The use of these theories helps highlight issues such as marginality, hybridity, and national identity as formative tools in resistance to empire and survival in exile.

Empire and Exile offers a lucid analysis of ways in which the book of Jeremiah reveals ancient Judean strategies for cultural survival during the period of Babylonian domination. Deftly deploying insights of Frantz Fanon, Homi Bhabha, Stuart Hall, and other postcolonial theorists, Davidson reads Jeremiah’s sign acts, discourses, and biographical narratives as complex responses to the pressures of colonization and dislocation. Fresh and compelling, this work sheds new light on the ambivalences that attend the subaltern’s struggle to reconfigure ‘home’ in an imperial context. Empire and Exile is an indispensable resource for readers wishing to explore the intersections of postcolonial criticism and biblical studies

Carolyn J. Sharp, professor of Hebrew Scriptures, Yale Divinity School

Steed Davidson received his PhD from Union Theological Seminary in New York. He is an assistant professor of Old Testament at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary in Berkeley, California. His teaching centers on prophetic books, paying attention to ancient empires and responses to empires in the formation of texts.

Jeremiah (Dis)Placed: New Directions in Writing/Reading Jeremiah

  • Editors: A.R. Pete Diamond and Louis Stulman
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 336

Jeremiah (Dis)Placed collects the best of the papers and responses presented to the 2007 and 2008 sessions of the Writing/Reading Jeremiah Group (SBL) offering an assessment of new interpretative directions in current Jeremiah Studies.

The Writing/Reading Jeremiah group was relaunched at the 2007 annual meeting of the SBL. Its purpose is to invite new readings and constructions of meaning with the book of Jeremiah “this side” of historicist paradigms and postmodernism. The group welcomes all strategies of reading Jeremiah that seek to reconfigure, redeploy, and move beyond conventional readings of Jeremiah. Their manifesto: “Not by compositional history alone, nor biographical portrayal alone, nor their accompanying theological superstructures. Rather, we seek interpretation from new spaces opened for reading Jeremiah by the postmodern turn.”

This book is well-edited and well-proofed. No doubt this collection will affect future research made on the book of Jeremiah in many ways.

Review of Biblical Literature

A.R. Pete Diamond is assistant professor at Santa Barbara City College and the author and coauthor of numerous contributions to the field including The Confessions of Jeremiah in Context, The Writings of the New Testament, and Troubling Jeremiah.

Louis Stulman is professor of religious studies at the University of Findlay. His numerous publications on Jeremiah include Troubling Jeremiah and Inspired Speech: Prophecy in the Ancient Near East Essays in Honor of Herbert B. Huffmon.

After Ezekiel: Essays on the Reception of a Difficult Prophet

  • Editors: Paul M. Joyce and Andrew Mein
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Ezekiel has long been considered the most difficult of all the prophetic books to understand. The prophet’s unusual visions, extraordinary behavior, and extravagant imagery have perplexed and fascinated readers for more than 2,500 years. The prophet has had an impact not only on theology and the life of the church and synagogue, but also on culture, art, and architecture. The volume brings together 15 new essays on Ezekiel’s impact by leading scholars which focus on a range of different parts of the book and periods of reception. Historically, they cover the reception of Ezekiel from the New Testament to the present day, and include both Jewish and Christian readings of the book. Methodologically, they offer a wide sample of the different approaches to the reception/history of interpretation current in contemporary biblical studies.

Overall, this is a very interesting and stimulating book. The essays have unearthed a wealth of insights that can be of help to us when we approach the difficult book of Ezekiel and seek to come to terms with its theology and its worldview.

Review of Biblical Literature

It makes use not only of religious texts, but also of artistic representations. It therefore offers a kaleidoscopic montage of themes and images from Ezekiel as they make an impact in a wide variety of contexts . . . Each of these pieces is a detailed scholarly analysis of its particular topic. The collection as a whole conveys a sense of Ezekiel, not as a dry text whose ‘problems’ need to be solved, but as a living book, in continuous conversation with its interpreters.

Reviews in Religion & Theology

Paul M. Joyce is university lecturer in theology at the University of Oxford and a fellow of St Peter’s College, Oxford. He is author of Divine Initiative and Human Response in Ezekiel and numerous articles on Ezekiel. He currently chairs the Society of Biblical Literature’s ‘Theological Perspectives on the Book of Ezekiel’ Section.

Andrew Mein is tutor in Old Testament at Westcott House, Cambridge. He is also the author of Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile.

Reconsidering the Date and Provenance of the Book of Hosea: The Case for Persian-Period Yehud

  • Author: James M. Bos
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This study argues that the book of Hosea ought to be understood and read as a text that was composed in Persian-period Yehud rather than in eighth-century Israel. The author challenges the traditional scholarship and emphasizes that there is evidence to suggest that the book should be viewed as a Judahite text—a book that was composed in the late sixth or early fifth century BC. Bos provides an overview of the state of prophetic research, as well as a discussion of genre and the generation of prophetic books, linguistic dating and provenance, and a survey of Hosea research. Bos discusses various aspects of the book of Hosea that aim to prove his argument the book was composed in Persian-period Yehud, namely, the anti-monarchical ideology of the book, the dual theme of “Exile” and “Return” which is consistent with the discourse found in other Judahite books dating to the sixth century, and the historiographical traditions.

James M. Bos earned his PhD in Near Eastern Studies at the University of Michigan. He is currently a visiting instructor of religion at the University of Mississippi.

The Book of Joel: A Prophet between Calamity and Hope

  • Author: Elie Assis
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Prophetic sayings are generally a reaction to immediate realities, and therefore attempts to understand prophetic literature without the benefit of the prophet’s historical milieu are limited or inaccurate. Contrary to the prevailing opinion that Joel is postexilic, it is argued that the book is located within the exilic period, recognizing the lack of any rebuke consistent with a people experiencing deep despair. The Book of Joel places great emphasis on the motif of the divine presence residing in the midst of Israel, and it is asserted that the prophet’s main purpose was to bring the people to a renewed connection with the Lord after the destruction of the Temple, which, though physically ruined, had not lost its religious significance. A literary and rhetorical analysis demonstrates how the prophet sought to influence his audience. Literary devices and rhetorical tools are investigated, and their relevance and contribution to the book’s meanings are explored. One central feature of the book is its focus on a detailed discussion of the position and purpose of the locust plague, employing recent literary approaches.

Elie Assis is the head of the department of Bible studies at Bar Ilan University. Among his scholarly work are his books From Moses to Joshua and from the Miraculous to the Ordinary: A Literary Analysis of the Conquest Narrative in the Book of Joshua, Self-Interest or Communal Interest? An Ideology of Leadership in the Gideon, Abimelech, and Jephthah Narratives (Judg. 6–12), and Flashes of Fire.

Aspects of Amos: Exegesis and Interpretation

  • Editors: Anselm C. Hagedorn and Andrew Mein
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This volume brings together eight new essays on Amos which focus on a range of issues within the book. They represent a number of different approaches to the text, from the text-critical to the psychoanalytical, and cover the history of the text, from composition to reception. Arising out of a symposium to honor John Barton for his 60th birthday, the essays all respond, either directly or indirectly, to his Amos’s Oracles Against the Nations, and to his lifelong concern with both ethics and method in biblical study.

Biblical scholars working on the book of Amos may find some of the detailed analysis of individual verses and/or passages helpful.

Review of Biblical Literature

Anselm Hagedorn is wissenschaftlicher assistant in Old Testament at the Humboldt-Universität in Berlin. He is also the editor of Perspectives on the Song of Songs.

Andrew Mein is tutor in Old Testament at Westcott House, Cambridge. He is also the author of Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile.

Still Selling the Righteous: A Redaction-Critical Investigation of Reasons for Judgment in Amos 2:6–16

  • Author: Graham R. Hamborg
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 304

This redaction-critical study interprets the reasons for judgment in Amos 2:6–16 in the literary context of each of the redactional compositions which, it is argued, underlie the text of Amos. It is proposed that the Amos text is both a theological work and a tractate of social criticism. In earlier redactional compositions, the dominant reasons for judgment concern mistreatment of the weak. In the later redactional compositions, these are overshadowed by more theological reasons for judgment. However, the theological reasons for judgment strengthen, rather than weaken, the force of the judgment against those who mistreat the weak.

Graham Hamborg is a continuing ministerial development officer in the Anglican Diocese of Chelmsford. This study is a revision of his doctoral thesis for which he was awarded a PhD by the University of Nottingham.

Lexical Dependence and Intertextual Allusion in the Septuagint of the Twelve Prophets: Studies in Hosea, Amos, and Micah

  • Author: Myrto Theocharous
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 304

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This book explores various aspects of intertextuality in the LXX of the Twelve Minor Prophets, with a special emphasis on Hosea, Amos, and Micah. Divided into five parts, the first introduces the topic of intertextuality, discusses issues relating to the Twelve and their translator, and concludes with various methodological considerations. Chapter two deals initially with the lexical sourcing of the prophets in their Hellenistic milieu and tests proposed theories of influence from the Pentateuch.

The rest of the book examines specific cases from the books of Hosea, Amos, and Micah. The third chapter deals with standard expressions used by the translator, even in places where the Hebrew does not correspond. The fourth chapter investigates the use of catchwords that the Greek translator identified in his Hebrew vorlage and that function for him as links between two or more texts. Finally, the fifth chapter examines cases where the translator understands the text to be alluding to specific biblical stories, events, and characters of particular interest in Hellenistic Judaism.

Myrto Theocharous is a professor of Hebrew and Old Testament at the Greek Bible College in Athens, Greece. She received her MA in Biblical Exegesis from Wheaton College in Illinois and her doctorate in Hebrew Studies from the University of Cambridge.

Visions and Eschatology: A Socio-Historical Analysis of Zechariah 1–6

  • Author: Antonios Finitsis
  • Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 208

Zechariah 1–6 is unlike most of the prophets in the Hebrew Bible. He is proestablishment and he conveys his message mostly with visions. These observations have led to scholarly disagreements as to how one should understand his role. Antonios Finitsis mediates these disagreements by triangulating the relationship of Zechariah’s visionary mode of expression, his message, and his function. Finitsis does this by examining the link between prophecy and apocalypticism in Zechariah and argues that Proto-Zechariah’s viewpoint is particular to the postexilic social setting. His visions are influenced by the social circumstances in which they are expressed. Proto-Zechariah refers to the near-future, using elements from the community’s present. Therefore, Finitsis defines the message of Proto-Zechariah as one of restoration eschatology, suggesting that the text is addressed to a small province plagued by inner-community conflicts. The text succeeds in alleviating social discord by empowering the people to rebuild their community. This presents a unique and challenging understand of Zechariah’s prophetic role.

Antonios Finitsis is assistant professor of Hebrew Bible at Pacific Lutheran University.

Urban Imagination in Biblical Prophecy

  • Author: Mary E. Mills
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 272

This volume brings together aspects of contemporary study of cultural geography and selected passages from prophetic texts of the Hebrew Bible. The aim is to identify how the image of the city helps to construct meaning inside the biblical material. In order to carry out this task, relevant textual narratives are analyzed and then read from the viewpoint of space, place, and urban studies. The latter category includes the works of Lefebvre, Bachelard, Soja, Massey, Amin, Thrift, and Pile, among others. A major finding is that urban imagination is a tool by which the texts manage the experience of political and social events in a time of radical change.

Mary Mills is professor of biblical studies at Liverpool Hope University. She studied modern history before turning to biblical studies, completing her doctoral studies at Heythrop College in the University of London. She is the author of Joshua to Kings: History, Story, Theology.

Leshon Limmudim: Essays on the Language and Literature of the Hebrew Bible in Honour of A.A. Macintosh

  • Editors: David A. Baer and Robert P. Gordon
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

In this volume, leading biblical scholars present cutting-edge essays on the language, literature, and context of the Hebrew Bible in honor of their friend, mentor, and colleague, Dr. Andrew Macintosh. From the drunken Noah to the inner workings of the Davidic monarchy, from the biblical genesis of humanity to the biblical lexicon of wine-making, senior scholars here present discerning essays that address a wide range of topics in biblical studies which characterizes the career and contribution of A.A. Macintosh.

David Baer is principal and lecturer in Old Testament and biblical languages at the Seminario ESEPA in San José, Costa Rica. He is also the author of When We All Go Home: Translation and Theology in LXX Isaiah 56–66.

Robert P. Gordon is regius professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge and fellow of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge. He is also the author of Sheffield Old Testament Guides: 1 & 2 Samuel and cotranslator of The Aramaic Bible, Volume 14: The Targum of the Minor Prophets.

The Artistic Dimension: Literary Explorations of the Hebrew Bible

  • Author: Keith Bodner
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

This volume presents a collection of essays aimed at further integration of literary analysis in the study of the Hebrew Bible. In three sections, Keith Bodner studies a range of texts in order to illustrate that literary analysis has value for exploring numerous issues in the discipline, including text-critical problems, the Deuteronomistic History, and Chronicles.

Beginning with a discussion of how literary analysis is a vital, yet neglected, component of textual criticism, Bodner then offers a close study of the so-called “ark narrative” of 1 Samuel 4–6. Other areas of the Hebrew Bible are subsequently explored, including a sample of the historiographic material in the Deuteronomistic History and a lengthy text from the book of Proverbs. Part four turns to the often neglected books of 1 & 2 Chronicles, illustrating how the Chronicler’s work is a congenial site for literary study. The assembled essays petition for a heightened awareness of the artistic achievement of the Hebrew Bible and illustrate the necessity of literary analysis in biblical interpretation.

Keith Bodner is professor of religious studies at Crandall University in New Brunswick, Canada. He holds PhD degrees in biblical studies (University of Aberdeen) and English Literature (University of Manchester). He serves on the editorial board of the Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, and is a former section chair (Bakhtin and the Biblical Imagination) for the Society of Biblical Literature. He is the author of Jeroboam’s Royal Drama.

Why? . . . How Long? Studies on Voice(s) of Lamentation Rooted in Biblical Hebrew Poetry

  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 176

This volume is born out of two years of academic presentations on laments in the Biblical Hebrew Poetry Section at the Society of Biblical Literature (2006–2007). This collection of essays presents new insights into various sections of the Hebrew Bible that contain “voices of lamentation,” including passages from poetic and prophetic texts. In addition to providing fresh readings of familiar texts through the lens of lamentation, these papers seek to deepen our understanding of Israel and God as lamenter and lamentee. Under the umbrella of lamentation, such themes are addressed as the unrighteous lamenter and God’s acceptance or rejection of lamentation. These scholarly studies on lament texts in the Hebrew Bible enhance our understanding of this ubiquitous genre in the Old Testament.

LeAnn Snow Flesher (MDiv, PhD) is an ordained minister with the American Baptist Churches and is currently working as professor of Old Testament at the American Baptist Seminary of the West in Berkeley, California.

Mark J. Boda is professor of Old Testament at McMaster Divinity College and a professor on the faculty of theology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. He is the of Translating the New Testament: Text, Translation, Theology, Bringing out the Treasure, and After God’s Own Heart: The Gospel According to David.

Carol Dempsey is professor of theology at the University of Portland in Oregon. She is the author of All Creation is Groaning: An Interdisciplinary Vision for Life in a Sacred Universe, Earth, Wind, and Fire: Biblical and Theological Perspectives on Creation, and Jeremiah: Preacher of Grace, Poet of Truth.

YHWH Elohim: A Survey of Occurrences in the Leningrad Codex and Their Corresponding Septuagintal Renderings

  • Author: Bruce J. Harvey
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 272

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This study provides a survey of all occurrences of YHWH followed by an Elohim appositive in the Leningrad Codex and their corresponding Septuagintal renderings. Its primary purpose is to demonstrate how each occurrence of YHWH Elohim, where Elohim is undetermined, could have resulted from changes made to an earlier text.

Harvey begins with a discussion of methodological issues. This is followed by a description of the context of the 887 occurrences of YHWH Elohim in the Leningrad Codex. In addition to breakdowns according to book, syntactic function, and speaker, a summary of corresponding variants in synoptic parallels, the Samaritan Pentateuch, Dead Sea Scrolls, and mediaeval manuscripts is also provided. This is followed by a summary of corresponding Septuagintal renderings. These context descriptions provide the foundation for an analysis of the 38 occurrences of YHWH Elohim where Elohim is undetermined.

Bruce J. Harvey earned his PhD from the University of Cambridge in Asian and Middle Eastern Studies.

The Days of Our Years: A Lexical Semantic Study of the Life Cycle in Biblical Israel

  • Author: Milton Eng
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 192

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This study is an investigation into the lexical meanings of Hebrew terms for the human life cycle in the Old Testament. The investigation differs from previous studies in that the terms are studied as members of the semantic domain of “age,” not in isolation from each other. Eng supplements his study with modern linguistic approaches, including syntagmatic and paradigmatic analysis.

Milton Eng is adjunct professor at William Paterson University in Wayne, NJ.

Brotherhood and Inheritance: A Canonical Reading of the Esau and Edom Traditions

  • Author: Bradford A. Anderson
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This study offers a canonical reading of the Esau and Edom traditions, examining the portrayal of Esau and Edom in Genesis, Deuteronomy, and the prophetic material. First, Anderson argues that the depiction of Esau and his descendants in Genesis and Deuteronomy is, on the whole, positive. Second, Anderson argues that Edom is portrayed negatively by the prophets for violating their kin and disrespecting the divine appointment of the land to Israel. Finally, Anderson suggests that these traditions have resonance with one another based on recurring literary and theological motifs, heuristically framed as brotherhood and inheritance.

Bradford A. Anderson is tutor in religious studies at Mater Dei Institute of Education, a college of Dublin City University.

Land or Earth? A Terminological Study of Hebrew “eres” and Aramaic “ara” in the Graeco-Roman Period

  • Author: Shizuka Uemura
  • Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

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This volume discusses the Hebrew term “eres” which is prominently used in creation and land theologies in the Bible. Uemura examines whether the term signifies ‘earth’ or ‘land’ and traces the historical development of its uses in relation to these two meanings. He offers a survey of all of the occurrences of this term, categorizes them, and discusses the problematic instances in all of the surviving Hebrew and Aramaic texts.

Uemura’s examination begins with an analysis of the terms under discussion literally and stylistically in order to discern the semantic field of each term, as well as to determine its stylistic idiomatic uses. He discusses the uses of these two terms in ancient non-Jewish circumstances using materials taken from Phoenician, New Punic, Moabite, and Aramaic inscriptions, as well as from an Aramaic papyri from Egypt and Nabataean papyri from Nahal Hever. This study illuminates the cultural background of these terms and sheds light on the biblical worldview of “eres.”

Shizuka Uemura was an associate professor at St. Margaret’s Junior College in Tokyo, Japan.

T&T Clark Handbook of the Old Testament: An Introduction to the Literature, Religion and History of the Old Testament

  • Authors: Jan Christian Gertz, Angelika Berlejung, Konrad Schmid, and Markus Witte
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 872

The T&T Clark Handbook of the Old Testament is a comprehensive introduction and guide to OT studies. This resource begins by presenting the methods and sources of OT studies and then presents a thorough overview of the biblical text as well as relevant discoveries and research in archaeology, ancient extrabiblical texts, and iconography. It explores varying exegetical methods and approaches including historical criticism, canonical criticism, the social scientific method, and feminist and liberation theologies. Methods in archaeology, Hebrew epigraphy, and iconography are also covered.

The second section is devoted to the history and religious history of Ancient Israel. Introductory matters, such as fundamental terminology and definitions, ethnic identity, ancestors and the dead, geography, and time reckoning are explicated before the book moves on to a historical survey from the Iron Age (c. 1200 BC) to the early Roman period (c. 63).

The heart of the book is a detailed survey of the Hebrew canonical books. The discussion for each book includes the biblical presentation and content, problems arising from the history of literary analysis and research, origin and development of the writing, theological themes, and notes on reception history.

This balanced, comprehensive, and detailed introduction now sets the standard for any textbook aiming to represent the worldwide state of scholarship on the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. The authors provide a clear and accessible entry to critical scholarship on both biblical texts and the history and religion of Israel. This volume belongs in the libraries of all with special interest in the Old Testament, from advanced students to senior scholars.

David Carr, professor of Old Testament, Union Theological Seminary, New York

Students look for the reliable and readable ‘introduction’ to the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible—but not only students. Scholars often find them useful for a quick reference and as a way of updating their knowledge in areas outside their immediate specialty. This volume will well meet the needs of both groups. Unlike some older introductions, it is not confined to the literature. The authors include chapters on archaeology, epigraphy, and iconography, which are often neglected in general introductions. All in all, this will be a very useful volume on the shelves of both scholars and students.

Lester L. Grabbe, professor emeritus of Old Testament and early Judaism, University of Hull

A highly informative, thorough, and up-to-date introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures. The authors provide helpful insights into the worlds of the ancient Israelites and their modern interpreters.

Gary N. Knoppers, Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Classics and Ancient Mediterranean Studies, Religious Studies, and Jewish Studies, Penn State University

This is a welcome resource for students and scholars alike . . . They maintain a broad lens throughout the volume that ranges from ancient Near Eastern texts and iconography to emerging ideological readings of the Hebrew Bible, while providing a summary of each book of the Hebrew Bible, its literary context, history of interpretation, reception, and meaning. The result is a snapshot by leading researchers of the rapidly changing field of Old Testament study, which enables the book to be a resource for a wide range of classes on the Hebrew Bible.

Thomas B. Dozeman, professor of Old Testament, United Theological Seminary

This textbook by colleagues Gertz, Schmid, Berlejung, and Witte provides the best possible access for English readers to current European scholarship in the field of Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. Their collaboration ensures coverage of diverse fields by experts. The treatment of various positions is balanced and up-to-date. A valuable resource.

Bernard M. Levinson, professor of classical and Near Eastern studies and of law, University of Minnesota

Jan Christian Gertz is professor of Old Testament at the University of Heidelberg in Germany.

Angelika Berlejung is professor of Old Testament at the University of Leipzig in Germany and professor for ancient Near Eastern studies at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa.

Konrad Schmid is professor of Old Testament and ancient Judaism at the University of Zurich in Switzerland.

Markus Witte is professor of Old Testament at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany.

Approaches to the “Chosen Place”: Accessing a Biblical Concept

  • Author: Rannfrid I. Thelle
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 256

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Deuteronomy’s command to restrict cultic practice to one “chosen place” has occupied a central position in scholars’ understandings of the book and their reconstruction of Israelite political and religious history. The debates about the date of Deuteronomy, its proposed connections to “Josiah’s reform,” and, most profoundly, the “Deuteronomistic History hypothesis” have dominated study of the idea of a “chosen place.” These debates have, to a large extent, determined how we read Deuteronomy and the Former Prophets. Through a reading of key texts from these corpora, this book provides a new, textually grounded perspective of the “chosen place.”

Rannfrid Thelle is an independent scholar working in Wichita, Kansas. She received academic training at the University of Oslo. She is also the author of Ask God: Divine Consultation in the Literature of the Hebrew Bible.

The Senses of Scripture: Sensory Perception in the Hebrew Bible

  • Author: Yael Avrahami
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 328

The Senses of Scripture reveals the essence of biblical epistemology—the ways in which ancient Israelites thought about and used their senses. The theoretical introduction demonstrates that scholars need to liberate themselves from the Western bias that holds a pentasensory paradigm and prioritizes the sense of sight.

Through examination of associative and contextual patterns, the author reaches a septasensory model including sight, hearing, speech, kinaesthesia, touch, taste, and smell. It is further demonstrated that the senses, according to the Hebrew Bible, are a divinely created physical experience that symbolizes human ability to act in a sovereign manner in the world. Despite the lack of a biblical Hebrew term for “sense,” it seems that at times the merism “sight and hearing” serves that purpose. Finally, the book discusses the longstanding dispute regarding the primacy of sight over hearing, and claims that although there is no strict sensory hierarchy evident in the text, sight holds a central space in biblical epistemology.

Yael Avrahami is a lecturer for biblical studies at Oranim College and the University of Haifa in Israel.

The Bible, Gender, and Reception History: The Case of Job’s Wife

  • Author: Katherine Low
  • Series: Library of Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

The Bible, Gender, and Reception History: The Case of Job’s Wife investigates the fleeting appearance of Job’s wife in the Bible and its interpretation throughout history. It begins by presenting key interpretive gaps in the biblical text concerning Job and his wife and explains guiding principles that gender studies offer to reconstruct a reception history of their marriage. After analyzing Job and his wife within medieval Christian theology of Eden, the author identifies ways in which Job’s wife visually aligns with medieval images of Satan. The volume explores portrayals of Job and his wife in publications on marriage and gender roles in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, moving on to an investigation of William Blake’s sharp artistic divergence from the common tradition in his representation of Job’s wife as a shrew. In the exploration of societal portrayals of Job and his Wife throughout history, this book discovers how arguments about marriage intertwine with not only gender roles, but also, with political, social, and historical movements.

Katherine Low is assistant professor of religion and chaplain at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Virginia. She has published articles in the Journal of Religion and Film, and the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion.

The Body as Property: Physical Disfigurement in Biblical Law

  • Author: Sandra Jacobs
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

The Body as Property argues that physical disfigurement functioned in biblical law to verify legal property acquisition. Jacobs marshals evidence from Sumerian and Mesopotamian cuneiform legal texts as well as ancient Assyrian cultural practices to shed light on ancient Israelite property laws and their relationship to physical disfigurement.

This is primarily substantiated in the accounts of prescriptive disfigurements such as circumcision and the piercing of a slave’s ear, both of which were required only when a son, or slave, was acquired permanently. It is further argued that legal entitlement was relevant to the punitive disfigurements recorded in Exodus 21:22–24 and Deuteronomy 25:11–12, where the physical violation of women was of concern solely as an infringement of male property rights.

Sandra Jacobs received her doctorate in biblical law from the University of Manchester and is an honorary research associate in the Department of Hebrew and Jewish Studies at University College in London.

Sons or Lovers: An Interpretation of David and Jonathan’s Friendship

  • Author: Jonathan Y. Rowe
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 160

Rowe examines David and Jonathan’s friendship in the context of what ancient readers would have understood as the natural loyalty to their families. Rowe focuses on the conflicting moral goods between which the men choose, seeking to understand the dynamics of the narrative consonant with ancient society.

Rowe discusses theoretical issues of interpretation and summarizes how Bakhtin’s theory of heteroglossic voices can be utilized to understand the narrative. He deliberates over the key aspects of family life in the world described by the Old Testament, surveys approaches to the study of the family among anthropologists, and explains how anthropology can inform the interpretation of the biblical text. Starting from the concept of “hegemonic masculinity,” Rowe examines how men in general are presented positively, and then shows how Jonathan, David, and Saul measure up to these standards. Rowe concludes that although Jonathan was disloyal to his family, something that original readers would have censured, the books of Samuel present this disloyalty as honorable, thus making a theological point about fidelity to the house of David.

Jonathan Y. Rowe received his PhD from St. Andrews University and is director of development and staff tutor at South Western Ministry Training Course in the UK.

Weighing Hearts: Character, Judgment, and the Ethics of Reading the Bible

  • Author: Stuart Lasine
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 320

Issues involving “character” have been the object of increasing interest and debate in recent years. Social psychologists attempt to determine the role of character as a cause of human behavior, moral philosophers explore the significance of character for understanding ethics and virtue, and literary scholars investigate the depiction of character in narrative. Weighing Hearts represents the first serious attempt to integrate all these approaches in order to gain a deeper and more precise understanding of how readers evaluate characters in biblical narrative. While the primary focus is on the Hebrew Bible, the author also includes several comparative analyses involving other ancient and modern literary works. Weighing Hearts also shows how biblical historians and redaction critics can make their analyses more precise and nuanced by taking into account what psychology has learned about the consistency of character and the “attribution errors” people make when evaluating others.

This is a fascinating, wide-ranging, and unusual study and its innovative approach succeeds in throwing fresh light on many familiar biblical texts.

E.W. Davies, head of School of Philosophy and Religion, Bangor University, UK

Stuart Lasine is professor of religion in the Ransom-Butler Department of Religion at Wichita State University.

Far From Minimal: Celebrating the Work and Influence of Philip R. Davies

  • Editors: Duncan Burns and John W. Rogerson
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 576

In this volume, Duncan Burns and John W. Rogerson assemble a first-rate collection of essays from leading OT scholars in honor of professor Philip R. Davies’ 60th birthday. These articles reflect the impact professor Davies has made in diverse fields within biblical studies including Hebrew Bible, Qumran, Palestinian archaeology, New Testament and early Judaism, and biblical interpretation. The breadth of this volume aims to reflect the scope, interest, and influence of professor Davies over the last 30 years.

Duncan Burns is a former doctoral student of professor Davies and is a freelance copyeditor.

John Rogerson is a former head of the department of theology and religious studies at the University of Sheffield and canon emeritus of Sheffield Cathedral. He is also the author of The Pentateuch, T&T Clark Study Guides: Genesis 1–11, and W.M.L. de Wette, Founding of Modern Biblical Criticism: An Intellectual Biography.

The One Who Reads May Run: Essays in Honour of Edgar W. Conrad

  • Editors: Roland Boer, Michael Carden, and Julie Kelso
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 304

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The purpose of this volume is to honor the work of Edgar Conrad. The essays focus on various aspects of Conrad’s work, especially the prophetic literature, the Bible as literature, canonical issues, and engaged readings. In developing these lines of scholarship, the authors pay tribute to Conrad and seek to take his work further. The contributions from Korean scholars are especially noteworthy, since Conrad has had significant influence on Korean biblical scholarship through students who studied under him at the University of Queensland.

Roland Boer is associate professor in comparative literature and cultural studies at Monash University in Australia. He is the editor of Semeia 88: A Vanishing Mediator? The Presence/Absence of the Bible in Postcolonialism and the author of Tracking ‘The Tribes of Yahweh’: On the Trail of a Classic and Redirected Travel: Alternative Journeys and Places in Biblical Studies.

Michael Carden is visiting lecturer at the University of Queensland in Australia.

Julie Kelso is an honorary research adviser in EMSAH. She is also a teaching fellow in philosophy at Bond University and is the managing editor of the e-journal The Bible and Critical Theory.

A God of Faithfulness: Essays in Honour of J. Gordon McConville on his 60th Birthday

  • Editors: Jamie A. Grant, Alison Lo, and Gordon Wenham
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 240

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This is a festschrift dedicated to J. Gordon McConville on the occasion of his 60th birthday in recognition of the outstanding contribution that he has made to the field of Old Testament studies over the last 25 years. The collection incorporates 13 essays written by colleagues, friends, and former research students, along with an introduction and complete list of McConville’s publications. The essays focus on each portion of the Old Testament—the Pentateuch, historical books, prophets, and writings—and address key issues of biblical interpretation. The breadth of subject matter that comes under discussion in this volume reflects the wide-ranging interests seen in McConville’s own published works.

A God of Faithfulness presents articles by friends and students of Gordon McConville that provide a fitting tribute to his continuing distinguished career. All serious students of the Old Testament will want to read these intriguing and informative studies.

Tremper Longman, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Jamie A. Grant is vice principal and tutor in biblical studies at the Highland Theological College.

Alison Lo is lecturer in Old Testament at London School of Theology.

Gordon J. Wenham is professor emeritus of Old Testament at the University of Gloucestershire and teaches Old Testament at Trinity College in Bristol. He is the author of Exploring the New Testament, vol. 1: Gospel and Acts and Paul and Jesus.

Enquire of the Former Age: Ancient Historiography and Writing the History of Israel

  • Editor: Lester L. Grabbe
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 304

The study of historiography and the distinction between modern and ancient historical writing is central to the study of the Bible which is largely historical narrative. This volume presents a collection of essays in a dialogical format in which contributors present and review various perspectives on historiography as it relates to biblical studies. Editor Lester L. Grabbe begins the work with a helpful introductory summary of the volume and the issues addressed. Then, the first part of the volume contains essays on various approaches to, and issues surrounding, ancient historiography and Israelite history from such notable scholars as Ehud Ben Zvi, Philip Davies, and Axel Knauf.

The second part presents reviews of histories of Israel or related works by such writers as William Dever; Baruch Halpern; Steven McKenzie; Alberto Soggin; Jens Bruun Kofoed; and Iain Provan, V. Phillips Long, and Tremper Longman, III. Reviewers include Niels Peter Lemche, Joseph Blenkinsopp, Philip Davies, Bob Becking, Ehud Ben Zvi, and Lester Grabbe. The authors of the reviewed works are then given the opportunity to respond, providing a well-rounded, international, and multifaceted presentation of the issues involved in this important topic.

Lester L. Grabbe is professor of Hebrew Bible and early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is also the founder and convener of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology. He is the author of Sheffield Old Testament Guides: Leviticus, T&T Clark Study Guides: Wisdom of Solomon, and Leading Captivity Captive: The Exile as History and Ideology.

Exclusive Inclusivity: Identity Conflicts between the Exiles and the People who Remained (6th–5th Centuries BCE)

  • Author: Dalit Rom-Shiloni
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

Using social psychology categories of ethnicity and group-identity, Exclusive Inclusivity explores the internal polemics of the postexilic Jewish community by analyzing the characteristics and traits of the phenomenon of exclusivity. Rom-Shiloni argues that several postexilic groups within Judaism vied for legitimacy by reconstructing boundaries of otherness through exclusivity and inclusivity. Through these strategies, groups sought to establish their own status as the in-group and disregard, or even delegitimize, all those considered out-group. The result, Rom-Shiloni argues, is that the Babylonian exilic ideology—characteristic of the exiles—captured central position in Jewish history and literature and silenced the voices of other Judean communities, namely, those whom the Babylonians left in Israel.

Dalit Rom-Shiloni is senior lecturer of Hebrew Bible at Tel Aviv University and the Jewish Institute of Religion at Hebrew Union College in Jerusalem, Israel.

By the Irrigation Canals of Babylon: Approaches to the Study of the Exile

  • Editors: John J. Ahn and Jill Middlemas
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 208

This work assembles some of the finest scholars in the field of ancient Israelite history. The essays examine the sixth century BC in general and the exile in particular through a variety of methods and drawing on various disciplines. The work is divided into three parts: essays focusing on historical and archeological analysis, essays utilizing literary theory, and essays employing sociological frameworks. Several essays also discuss the exile in relation to key Old Testament passages, such as Deuteronomy 34 and Jeremiah’s book of consolation.

John J. Ahn is assistant professor of Old Testament at Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary. He is the author of Exile as Forced Migrations: A Sociological, Literary, and Theological Approach on the Displacement and Resettlement of the Southern Kingdom of Judah.

Jill Middlemas is research associate in the department of Old Testament at the University of Zurich. She is the author of The Troubles of Templeless Judah

Not Sparing the Child: Human Sacrifice in the Ancient World and Beyond: Studies in Honor of Professor Paul G. Mosca

  • Editors: Daphna Arbel, Paul C. Burns, J.R.C. Cousland, Richard Menkis, and Dietmar Neufeld
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 320

Human sacrifice in the ancient Mediterranean world continues to be a topic that ignites popular imagination and engenders scholarly discussion and controversy. This volume aims to advance the discussion by providing balanced and judicious treatments of these topics from a cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural perspective. It provides nuanced examinations of ancient ritual, exploring the various meanings that human sacrifice held for antiquity, and examines its varied repercussions up into the modern world. The book explores evidence that sheds new light on the origins of the rite, to whom these sacrifices were offered, and by whom they were performed. It presents fresh insights into the social and religious meanings of this practice in its varied biblical landscape and ancient contexts, and demonstrates how human sacrifice has captured the imagination of later writers who have employed it in diverse cultural and theological discourses to convey their own views and ideologies. It provides valuable perspectives for understanding key cultural, theological, and ideological dimensions, such as the sacrifice of Christ, scapegoating, self-sacrifice, and martyrdom in post-biblical and modern times.

Daphna Arbel is associate professor in the department of classical, Near Eastern, and religious studies at the University of British Columbia.

Paul C. Burns is associate professor emeritus of classical, Near Eastern, and religious studies at the University of British Columbia.

J.R.C. Cousland is associate professor in the department of classical, Near Eastern, and religious studies at the University of British Columbia.

Richard Menkis is associate professor of medieval and modern Jewish history of the University of British Columbia.

Dietmar Neufeld is associate professor in the department of classical, Near Eastern, and religious studies at the University of British Columbia.

Judah between East and West: The Transition from Persian to Greek Rule (ca. 400–200 BCE)

  • Editors: Lester L. Grabbe and Oded Lipschits
  • Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 336

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This is a collection of essays by leading scholars examining the period of transition between Persian and Greek rule of Judah, ca. 400–200 BCE. Authors explore the archaeology of Maresha/Marisa, Jewish identity, Hellenization/Hellenism, Ptolemaic administration in Judah, biblical and Jewish literature of the early Greek period, the size and status of Jerusalem, the Samaritans in the transition period, and Greek foundations in Palestine. Judah between East and West offers cutting-edge work for a readership of scholars, teachers, postgraduate students and advanced undergraduates in the field of second temple studies. All the many and diverse aspects of second temple study are represented and promoted, including innovative work from historical perspectives, studies using social-scientific and literary theory, and developing theological, cultural, and contextual approaches.

Lester L. Grabbe is professor of Hebrew Bible and early Judaism at the University of Hull. He is also the founder and convener of the European Seminar in Historical Methodology. He is the author of Sheffield Old Testament Guides: Leviticus, T&T Clark Study Guides: Wisdom of Solomon, and Leading Captivity Captive: The Exile as History and Ideology.

Oded Lipschits is associate professor of Jewish history at Tel Aviv University.

Exploring the Narrative: Jerusalem and Jordan in the Bronze and Iron Ages

  • Editors: Noor Mulder, Jeanette Boertien, and Eveline van der Steen
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 352

This volume brings together a number of scholars who use archaeology as a tool to question the sometimes easy assumptions made by historians and biblical scholars about the past. It includes essays from both archaeologists and biblical scholars whose subject matter, whilst differing widely in both geographical and chronological terms, shares a critical stance used to examine the relationship between dirt archaeology and the biblical world as presented to us through written sources.

Noor Mulder is an independent scholar and classical archaeologist.

Jeanette Boertien is an archaeologist in the faculty of theology and religious studies at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands.

Eveline van der Steen is a Near Eastern archaeologist and an honorary research fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics, and Egyptology at the University of Liverpool.

Mixed Marriages: Intermarriage and Group Identity in the Second Temple Period

  • Editors: Christian Frevel
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 352

Intermarriage and group identity in the second temple period is investigated from different points of view with regard to methodology and analyzed texts. With an introduction to the history of research and a summarizing final section, the individual contributions are associated with the larger context of the recent debate. The diversity of texts on mixed marriage within the Hebrew Bible and related scripture will be shown and emphasized and the question of continuity and discontinuity as well as the socio-historical background of marriage restrictions is discussed.

Covering a wide range of texts from the Hebrew Bible as well as from the Elephantine, Qumran and several pseudepigrapha, like Jubilees, Mixed Marriages’ focus is on possible counter texts with a more positive notion of foreign wives, in addition to restrictive and prohibitive texts.

These different approaches will illuminate the dynamics of the construction of group identity, culminating in conflicts concerning separation and integration which can be found in the debate on the topic of the “correct” marriage.

Christian Frevel is professor of Old Testament studies at the Ruhr-University of Bochum, member of the German Society for the Exploration of Palestine, and an internal fellow of the International Consortium for Research in the Humanities.

Focusing Biblical Studies: The Crucial Nature of the Persian and Hellensitic Periods: Essays in Honor of Douglas A. Knight

  • Editors: Jon L. Berquist and Alice Hunt
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume makes a positive intervention into maximalist/minimalist debates about Israelite historiography by pointing to the events that happened during the Persian and Hellenistic periods. During this historical epoch, traditions about Israel and Judah’s founding became fixed as markers of ethnic identity, and much of the canonical Hebrew Bible came into its present form. Concentrating on these events, a clearer historical picture emerges.

The entire volume is set within the context of Doug Knight’s contributions, which have encouraged a rigorous social-scientific and tradition-historical approach to the Hebrew Bible and ancient Israel in general. Many scholars have pursued how the social scientific method—first used to analyze early monarchic Israel—can shape the understanding of these later historical periods. Knight's methods, teachings, writings, and scholarly interventions have pointed the contributors of this volume to fresh considerations of the Persian and Hellenistic periods. The concluding essay will examine the future directions in which such sociological and historical investigation can go forward.

Jon L. Berquist is senior academic editor at Westminster Jon Knox Press.

Alice Hunt is president of Chicago Theological Seminary.

Mediating between Heaven and Earth: Communication with the Divine in the Ancient Near East

  • Editor: C.L. Crouch, Jonathan Stökl, and Anna Elise Zernecke
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 208

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In this volume experts analyze the variety of means by which humans historically sought to communicate with their gods and by which the gods were seen to communicate with their worshippers. In a departure from previous scholarship, this work brings together the study of prophecy, as an intuitive form of divination, with the study of technical methods of communication and other forms of institutionalized communication such as prayer.

Such a format allows divine-human communication to be studied in both directions simultaneously: the means by which the divine communicates to human beings through divination, and the means by which human beings communicate with the divine through prayer. This new perspective on the study of divine-human-divine communication allows scholars to better appreciate the way in which communication and the relationship between heaven and earth was conceived in the ancient Near East.

C.L. Crouch is a lecturer in Hebrew Bible at the University of Nottingham. He is the author of War and Ethics in the Ancient Near East: Military Violence in Light of Cosmology and History.

Jonathan Stökl is a research assistant at University College London.

Anna Elise Zernecke is Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.

Canaan and Israel in Antiquity: A Textbook on History and Religion

  • Author: K.L. Noll
  • Edition: Second
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 356

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This comprehensive textbook represents the most recent approaches to the biblical world by surveying Palestine’s social, political, economic, religious, and ecological changes between the Palaeolithic and Roman eras. Designed for beginners with little knowledge of the ancient world, and offering copious illustrations and charts, it explains how and why academic study of the past is undertaken, as well as the differences between historical and theological scholarship and the differences between ancient and modern genres of history writing. Classroom tested chapters emphasize the authenticity of the Bible as a product of an ancient culture, and the many problems with the biblical narrative as a historical source. Neither “maximalist” nor “minimalist,” it is sufficiently general to avoid confusion and to allow the assignment of supplementary readings such as biblical narratives and ancient Near Eastern texts. This new edition has been fully revised, incorporating new graphics and English translations of Near Eastern inscriptions. New material on the religiously diverse environment of Ancient Israel taking into account the latest archaeological discussions brings this book right up to date.

Though a textbook addressed to students, this is an important book for biblical studies as a whole. After more than 40 years of crisis and debate, Noll presents here a history of ancient Canaan and Israel which is both sound and balanced. I would recommend it to all teachers in the field without reservation.

Thomas L. Thompson, professor emeritus, University of Copenhagen

K.L. Noll is associate professor of religion of Brandon University. He is the author of Canaan and Israel in Antiquity: An Introduction and The Faces of David.

The Israelite Woman: Social Role and Literary Type in Biblical Narrative

  • Author: Athalya Brenner-Idan
  • Edition: Second
  • Series: T&T Clark Cornerstones
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 168

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In the first edition of The Israelite Woman Athalya Brenner-Idan provided the first book-length treatment by a feminist biblical scholar of the female characters in the Hebrew Bible. Now, thirty years later, Brenner provides a fresh take on this groundbreaking work, considering how scholarly observation of female biblical characters has changed and how it has not. Brenner-Idan also provides a new and highly personal introduction to the book, which details, perhaps surprisingly to present readers, what was at stake for female biblical scholars looking to engage honestly in the academic debate at the time in which the book was first written. This will make difficult reading for some, particularly those whose own views have not changed.

The main part of the book presents Brenner-Idans’s now classic examination of the roles of women in the society of ancient Israel, and the roles they play in the biblical narratives. In Part I Brenner-Idan surveys what can be known about the roles of queens, wise women, women poets and authors, prophetesses, magicians, sorcerers and witches and female prostitutes in Israelite society. In Part II the focus is on the typical roles in which Hebrew women appear in biblical stories, as mother of the hero, as temptress, as foreigner, and as ancestress. In these narratives, for which there are standard plots and structures and characterizations readily available, women play a generally domestic role.

Not only is the book a highly valuable resource detailing the social role of women in ancient Israel, and showing how the interpretation of women in the bible has been influenced by convention, but it is also a challenging reminder of how outdated attitudes can still prevail.

A wonderful book—concise, thoughtful, and as much an introduction to the Hebrew Bible as a whole as a reflection of the place of women within it.

Francis Landy, professor, University of Alberta, Canada

The Israelite Woman represents the first book-length treatment of the appearance of female characters in the Hebrew Bible. Mainstream male scholars routinely assumed that the portrayal of women characters in the text corresponds fairly accurately to the lives and activities of real women. Brenner’s solution was to use a broad swathe of methods drawn from folklore, literary criticism, classics, anthropology, and archaeology to begin to sort through the relationship between literary character and lived reality. The resulting work is no less than a methodological revolution that brought female scholars into relevance, gathering together voices and work that had never appeared together previously, and transforming existing practices and conclusions.

Carole Fontaine, professor of biblical theology and history, Andover Newton Theological School

Athalya Brenner-Idan is professor emerita of the Old Testament at the Universiteit van Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and currently professor in biblical studies at the Department of Hebrew Culture Studies, Tel Aviv University, Israel, and research associate at the Biblia Arabica Project there.

The Binding of Isaac: A Religious Model of Disobedience

  • Author: Omri Boehm
  • Series: T&T Clark Cornerstones
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 240

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Traditional interpretations in both Judaism and Christianity argue that the Akedah presents not only an ethical question but also an ethical reply. But for the intervention of the angel, Abraham would have killed his son. Obedience to God takes precedence over morality as humanly conceived. Yet, the angel of YHWH that appears to Abraham is a later addition to the text; thus, in the original narrative Abraham actually disobeys the divine command to slay his son, and sacrifices a ram instead.

The first part of the book shows how the “original” version of the narrative did not contain the angelic figure. The second part of the book reexamines various religious interpretations of the text to show that exegetes such as Maimonides and his followers did point out Abraham's disobedience. According to these writers the esoteric layer of the story in fact declares that disobedience to God’s command was Abraham’s true affirmation of faith. In the third part of the book, Boehm reopens the philosophical debate between Kant and Kierkegaard. Boehm concludes the book by contending that the monotheistic model of faith presented by Abraham was actually a model of disobedience.

. . . a rare delight. Boehm offers a fresh and sometimes disturbing reading . . . This is a rich and thought-provoking book that definitely deserves to be read.

Svensk Exegetisk Årsbok

Omri Boehm is a doctoral student in the Philosophy department at Yale University who has published articles on the Akedah in various Hebrew Bible journals.

Zechariah and His Visions: An Exegetical Study of Zechariah's Vision Report

  • Author: Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 256

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Did Zechariah really see visions? This question cannot be definitely answered, so the idea must remain a hypothesis. Here, Tiemeyer shows that this hypothesis is nonetheless reasonable and instrumental in shedding light on matters in Zechariah’s vision report that are otherwise unclear.

Tracking through each verse of the text, the key exegetical problems are covered, including the topics of the distinction between visions and dreams, dream classification, conflicting sources of evidence for dream experiences, and rhetorical imagery as opposed to dream experience. Further attention is focused on the transmission of the divine message to Zechariah, with the key question raised of whether a visual or oral impression is described. Tiemeyer’s study further demonstrates that Zechariah 1–6 depicts a three-tier reality. This description seeks to convey the seer’s visionary experience to his readers. In a trance state, Zechariah communicates with the Interpreting Angel, while also receiving glimpses of a deeper reality known as the ‘visionary world.’

Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer is senior lecturer in Hebrew Bible at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. She has written widely on the prophetic literature, including two full-length monographs, on aspects of Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Zechariah.

Reading Ecclesiastes Intertextually

  • Editors: Katharine Dell and Will Kynes
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 288

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This volume continues the study of intertextuality in the ‘Wisdom Literature’ initiated in Reading Job Intertextually. Like that book, Reading Ecclesiastes Intertextually provides the first comprehensive treatment of intertextuality in this wisdom text. Articles address intertextual resonances between Ecclesiastes and texts across the Hebrew canon, along with texts throughout history, from Greek classical literature to the New Testament, Jewish and Christian interpretation, and existential and Modern philosophy.

As a multiauthored volume that gathers together scholars with expertise on this diverse array of texts, this collection provides exegetical insight that exceeds any similar attempt by a single author. The contributors have been encouraged to pursue the intertextual approach that best suits their topic, thereby offering readers a valuable collection of intertextual case studies addressing a single text.

Katharine Dell is senior lecturer at the faculty of divinity, Cambridge University, and fellow of St. Catharine's College, Oxford. She is the author of The Book of Job as Sceptical Literature and the coeditor of Reading Job Intertextually.

Will Kynes is departmental lecturer in Old Testament studies at St Peter’s College, University of Oxford, and Liddon Research Fellow and Tutor of Theology at Keble College, Oxford. He is the author of My Psalm Has Turned into Weeping: Job’s Dialogue with the Psalms and the coeditor of Reading Job Intertextually.

The God Ezekiel Creates

  • Editors: Paul M. Joyce and Dalit Rom-Shiloni
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 232

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This powerful collection of essays focuses on the representation of God in the book of Ezekiel. With topics spanning across projections of God, through to the implications of these creations, the question of the divine presence in Ezekiel is explored. Madhavi Nevader analyses Divine Sovereignty and its relation to creation, while Dexter E. Callender Jr. and Ellen van Wolde route their studies in the image of God, as generated by the character of Ezekiel. The assumption of the title is then inverted, as Stephen L. Cook writes on ‘The God that the Temple Blueprint Creates,’ which is taken to its other extreme by Marvin A. Sweeney in his chapter on ‘The Ezekiel that God Creates,’ and finds a nice reconciliation in Daniel I. Block’s chapter, ‘The God Ezekiel Wants Us to Meet.’ Finally, two essays from Christian biblical scholar Nathan MacDonald and Jewish biblical scholar, Rimon Kasher, offer a reflection on the essays about Ezekiel and his God.

Paul M. Joyce is university lecturer in theology in the University of Oxford and a fellow of St. Peter’s College, Oxford. He is author of Divine Initiative and Human Response in Ezekiel and numerous articles on Ezekiel, and currently chairs the Society of Biblical Literature’s ‘Theological Perspectives on the Book of Ezekiel’ Section.

Dalit Rom-Shiloni is senior lecturer of Hebrew Bible at Tel Aviv University and the Jewish Institute of Religion at Hebrew Union College in Jerusalem, Israel.

Concerning the Nations: Essays on the Oracles Against the Nations in Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel

  • Editors: Andrew Mein, Else K. Holt, and Hyun Chul Paul Kim
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 304

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Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel share much in common. They address the pivotal times and topics associated with the last stages of the monarchical history of Israel, and with the development of new forms of communal and religious life through exile and beyond. One important structural component of all three books is a substantial section which concerns itself with a range of foreign nations, commonly called the “Oracles against the Nations”, which form the focus of this book.

These chapters together present the most up-to-date scholarship on the oracles—an oft-neglected but significant area in the study of the prophetic literature. The particular characteristics of Isaiah, Jeremiah (both Masoretic Text and Septuagint versions), and Ezekiel, are discussed showcasing the unique issues pertinent to each book and the diverse methods used to address them. These evident differences aside, the Oracles Against the Nations are employed as a springboard in order to begin the work of tracing similarities between the texts. By focusing on these unique yet common sections, a range of interrelated themes and issues of both content and method become noticeable: for example, though not exhaustively, pattern, structure, language, comparative history, archaeology, sociology, politics, literature, imagery, theme, theology, and hermeneutical issues related to today’s context. As a result this collection presents a range of cutting-edge approaches on these key prophetic books, and will provide a basis for further comparative study and reflection.

Andrew Mein is tutor in Old Testament at Westcott House, Cambridge. He is also the author of Ezekiel and the Ethics of Exile.

Else K. Holt is a lecturer in the department of Old Testament at the University of Aarhus, Denmark.

Hyun Chul Paul Kim is professor of Hebrew Bible at Methodist Theological School in Ohio

Jeremiah Invented: Constructions and Deconstructions of Jeremiah

  • Editors: Else K. Holt and Carolyn J. Sharp
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 168

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In the first half of the twentieth century, there was immense scholarly interest in the biography of the prophet Jeremiah as the background for understanding the development of the book of Jeremiah. Around the turn of the century this interest disappeared, but it has now resurfaced in a transformed configuration as work seeking to analyze the creation of the literary persona, Jeremiah the prophet.

This volume examines the construction of Jeremiah in the prophetic book and its afterlife, presenting a wide range of scholarly approaches spanning the understanding of Jeremiah from Old Testament times via the Renaissance to the twentieth century, and from theology to the history of literature.

Else K. Holt is a lecturer in the department of Old Testament at the University of Aarhus, Denmark.

Carolyn J. Sharp is professor of Hebrew Scriptures at Yale Divinity School and is the author of Prophecy and Ideology in Jeremiah: Struggles for Authority in the Deutero-Jeremianic Prose.

[Re]Reading Again: A Mosaic Reading of Numbers 25

  • Author: Anthony Rees
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 208

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Guided by the metaphor of the art form known as a mosaic, this book advocates a pluralistic approach to biblical studies. Rees argues that the text itself can be described as a ‘mosaic’, with each new reading adding to the mosaic. Interpretation is therefore both observation and invention, or contribution. When [re]reading the text, one cannot but be aware of what has been seen before, even if it at first may seem unfamiliar. He thus rejects the idea of a definitive reading.

Examining Numbers 25, Rees argues that the various methods employed to interpret this text (narrative, feminist, postcolonial as well as a more ‘traditional’ historical-critical reading) enable us to see different things as we read from different places. A further analysis of the book’s interpretative history, including the rewritten histories of Josephus and Philo, allows us to discover that creativity has forever been a part of the reading process. Moving on to explore the contributions of more recent commentators, Rees concludes that an embrace of diversity, of collegiality, may well point to a new future in Biblical Studies.

Anthony Rees is research fellow at the Center for Public and Contextual Theology of Charles Sturt University, Australia.

“I Lifted My Eyes and Saw”: Reading Dream and Vision Reports in the Hebrew Bible

  • Editors: Elizabeth R. Hayes and Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 272

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This volume addresses the function and impact of vision and dream accounts in the Hebrew Bible. The contributors explore the exegetical, rhetorical, and structural aspects of the vision and dream accounts in the Hebrew Bible, focusing on prophetic vision reports. Several contributors employ a diachronic approach as they explore the textual relationship between the vision reports and the oracular material. Others focus on the rhetorical aspects of the vision reports in their final form and discuss why vision reporting may be used to convey a message. Another approach employed looks at reception history and investigates how this type of text has been understood by past exegetes. A few chapters consider the intertextual relationship of the various vision reports in the Hebrew Bible, focusing on shared themes and motifs. There are also papers that deal with the ways in which select texts in the Hebrew Bible portray dream/vision interpreters and their activities.

Elizabeth R. Hayes is affiliate professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. She has written on Jeremiah and Ezekiel, with special interest in reception history and in cognitive linguistics as a hermeneutical strategy. She is the author of The Pragmatics of Perception and Cognition in MT Jeremiah 1:1–6:30: A Cognitive Linguistics Approach.

Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer is senior lecturer in Hebrew Bible at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK. She has written widely on the prophetic literature, including two full-length monographs, on aspects of Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Zechariah.

Elohim within the Psalms: Petitioning the Creator to Order Chaos in Oral-Derived Literature

  • Author: Terrance Randall Wardlaw Jr.
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 208

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The issue of the so-called Elohistic Psalter has intrigued biblical scholars since the rise of the historical-critical enterprise. Scholars have attempted to discover why the name Elohim is used almost exclusively within Psalms 42–83, and in particular they have attempted to identify the historical circumstances which explain this phenomenon. Traditionally, an original YHWH was understood to have been replaced by Elohim.

Frank-Lothar Hossfeld and the late Erich Zenger propose that the use of the title Elohim is theologically motivated, and they account for this phenomenon in their redaction-historical work. Wardlaw here builds upon their work (1) by integrating insights from Dell Hymes, William Miles Foley, and Susan Niditch with regard to oral-traditional cultures, and (2) by following the text-linguistic approach of Eep Talstra and Christof Hardmeier and listening to canonical texture as a faithful witness to Israel’s religious traditions. Wardlaw proposes that the name Elohim within the Psalms is a theologically-laden term, and that its usage is related to pentateuchal traditions.

Terrance Randall Wardlaw Jr. is a linguist and translator with SIL International.

Psalmody and Poetry in Old Testament Ethics

  • Editor: Dirk J. Human
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 224

Questions arise from scholarly debate in Hebrew Bible ethics such as: what is Old Testament ethics? what is the object of study? what are the methods involved and how normative are Old Testament ethics for modern contexts? These questions advance crucial issues in the quest for understanding ethics of the ancient Hebrew mind and the problem of how to contextualize them in modern contexts.

This book begins by exploring the relationship between the Old Testament and Ethics, as well as a philosophical discussion on meta-ethical presuppositions on divinity and morality in the Psalter. The main part of the book reflects analyses of specific psalms (Psalms 16; 34; 50; 72; 104; and 133). The core of this section reflects an illustration of psalm texts with the thematic focus on Hebrew ethical thinking. Included are a few contextual contributions discussing relevant ethical issues in Africa from an African perspective. In the final section two exemplary poetic texts from the Pentateuch (Deuteronomy 32) and the Prophets (Jeremiah 5) reverberate ethical thinking from other parts of the Hebrew canon.

Attentive to the historical and sociologically formed worlds behind the text and aware of the place of the reader, this volume seeks to further the scholarly understanding of an ethics of the ancient Hebrew mind as well as contextualize contemporary African ethical issues.

—Seth B. Tarrer, professor of Old Testament, Insituto Teológico San Andrés, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Dirk J. Human is head of biblical and religious studies at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. He is the author of Psalms and Liturgy and Psalms and Hebrews: Studies in Reception.

Imagining the Other and Constructing Israelite Identity in the Early Second Temple Period

  • Editors: Ehud Ben Zvi and Diana Vikander Edelman
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 360

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This volume sheds light on how particular constructions of the ‘Other’ contributed to an ongoing process of defining what ‘Israel’ or an ‘Israelite’ was or was supposed to be in literature taken to be authoritative in the late Persian and early Hellenistic periods. It asks, who is an insider and who an outsider? Are boundaries permeable? Are there different ideas expressed within individual books? What about constructions of the (partial) ‘Other’ from inside (e.g., women) people whose body did not fit social constructions of normalness? It includes chapters dealing with theoretical issues and case studies, and addresses similar issues from the perspective of groups in the late Second Temple period so as to shed light on processes of continuity and discontinuity on these matters. Preliminary forms of five of the contributions were presented in Thessaloniki in 2011 in the research program, ‘Production and Reception of Authoritative Books in the Persian and Hellenistic Period,’ at the Annual Meeting of the European Association of Biblical Studies (EABS).

Ehud Ben Zvi is professor of ancient history at the University of Alberta, Canada. He is the author of A Historical-Critical Study of the Book of Zephaniah, A Historical-Critical Study of the Book of Obadiah, and Signs of Jonah: Reading and Rereading in Ancient Yehud.

Diana Vikander Edelman is on the faculty of theology at the University of Oslo, Norway, and the Center For Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. She is the author of Fabric of History: Text, Artifact and Israel’s Past and King Saul in the Historiography of Judah, and the coeditor of A Palimpsest: Rhetoric, Ideology, Stylistics, and Language Relating to Persian Israel.

Prophecy and the Prophets in Ancient Israel: Proceedings of the Oxford Old Testament Seminar

  • Editor: John Day
  • Series: Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies (LHBOTS/JSOTS)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 480

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This major work reexamines prophecy and the prophets in ancient Israel, with essays ranging all the way from Israel’s ancient Near Eastern background right up to the New Testament. The majority of essays concentrate on prophecy and the prophets in the Old Testament, which are approached from a remarkable number of different angles.

Particular attention is paid to the following subjects: prophecy amongst Israel’s ancient Near East neighbours; female prophets in both Israel and the ancient Near East; Israelite prophecy in the light of sociological, anthropological and psychological approaches; Deuteronomy 18:9–22, the prophets and Scripture; Elijah, Elisha and prophetic succession; the theology of Amos; Hosea and the Baal cult; the sign of Immanuel; the rewriting of Isaiah in Isaiah 28–31; Deutero-Isaiah and monotheism; Jeremiah and God; aniconism and anthropomorphism in Ezekiel; Habakkuk’s dialogue with God and the language of legal disputation; Zephaniah and the ‘Book of the Twelve’ hypothesis; structure and meaning in Malachi; prophecy and Psalmody; prophecy in Chronicles; and prophecy in the New Testament.

John Day is professor of Old Testament studies in the University of Oxford, and fellow and tutor of Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford. He is the author of In Search of Pre-Exilic Israel, From Creation to Babel: Studies in Genesis 1–11, and Lectures on the Religion of the Semites.

The Temple in Text and Tradition: A Festschrift in Honour of Robert Hayward

  • Editor: R. Timothy McLay
  • Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 336

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The Second Temple period is an era that marked a virtual explosion in the world of literature, with the creation, redaction, interpretation, and transmission of Jewish texts that represented diverse languages and ideologies. The creation of many of these writings coincided with the growth of the Jewish community beyond the borders of Israel—therefore, among those for whom the Temple played a diminishing role. The transition period from Temple to texts was accompanied by conflicting interpretations about the role of the Temple as well as diverse theological understandings about God and the Jewish people.

Drawing on the expertise of leading specialists in Second Temple Judaism, Temple, Texts, and Traditions explores the rich traditions of the Jewish people as they were expressed and interpreted in their writings in that period, which included writings that later became recognized as scriptures.

R. Timothy McLay is an independent scholar currently residing in Toronto. He has served as associate professor of religious studies, languages, and ministry studies at St. Stephen’s University. He earned his BA at Atlantic Baptist University, MDiv at Acadia, and PhD at Durham, UK.

The T&T Clark Hebrew Primer

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Learning Biblical Hebrew can be extremely difficult. Here at last is a book designed to work in conjunction with the many Hebrew grammars available, breaking the complex language into bite-size chunks for revision and consolidation of key aspects of grammarand vocabulary.

A.A. Macintosh and C.L. Engle combine insights from teaching Hebrew in both the United States and Europe, and between them bring some 50 years of experience of teaching Hebrew to undergraduate students to this clearly structured book.

The T&T Clark Hebrew Primer For Revision and Consolidation by A.A. Macintosh with C.L. Engle is a very welcome addition to the corpus of works which seek to instruct English speakers who already have a basic or rudimentary knowledge of Hebrew.

—Judith Hadley, associate professor of theology and religious studies, Villanova University

For the beginning student this primer provides an excellent didactic aid with the central principles of Hebrew grammar and the basic biblical vocabulary and for the more advanced student it serves as an effective tool in rehearsing these areas.

Emanuel Tov, professor of Bible, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Now at last we have a concise but clear primer to trace the pathway back to a working knowledge of the language. And all this from the hands of experienced teachers who know how to spice the text with enlivening features which they have discovered help the difficult bits to ‘stick.’

H.G.M. Williamson, regius professor of Hebrew, University of Oxford

A.A. Macintosh is dean emeritus of St. John’s College, Cambridge, UK. He is also the author of A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Hosea.

C.L. Engle is adjunct professor of Hebrew and Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, Houston, Texas.

An Introduction to the Study of Ezekiel

  • Author: Michael A. Lyons
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 224

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An introduction to the study of Ezekiel that lays out for the reader the central issues for the interpretation of the book of Ezekiel. After explaining how the message of the prophet was relevant to the exilic situation in which he lived, this thorough guide shows how later generations shaped, transmitted, and used Ezekiel in their own communities.

The book summarizes the literary shape and contents of Ezekiel, then examines the theories and methodologies used in current scholarship that explain the formation of Ezekiel. Lyons next explains for the reader the theology and major themes of Ezekiel, and closes by evaluating how the arguments of Ezekiel relate to each other as a coherent rhetorical strategy.

Michael Lyons is associate professor of Old Testament at Simpson University in Redding. He is the coeditor of Transforming Visions: Transformations of Text, Tradition, and Theology in Ezekiel.

Singing at the Winepress: Ecclesiastes and the Ethics of Work

  • Author: Tyler Atkinson
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 264

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This book uses Qoheleth’s work ethic to provide an analysis of Ecclesiastes, utilising the writings of St. Bonaventure and Martin Luther. Reading Ecclesiastes within a penitential framework, Bonaventure offers a version of the contemptus mundi tradition that is rooted in his metaphysics. His commentary is ethically significant for the way he detects the vice of curiosity precipitating a perceptual rupture wherein vanity comes to signify sin and guilt. Luther, on the other hand, interprets Solomon as a wise economic-political administrator who preaches the good news of God’s involvement in quotidian existence. This understanding enables Luther to read Ecclesiastes eschatologically, with labor being seen as a locus of divine activity.

One may thus read Solomon’s refrain as an invitation to labor with the expectation of receiving God’s gifts in the present. Finally, Atkinson suggests that Ecclesiastes enhances current conversations regarding the theology and ethics of work by working the doctrinal focuses of protology and eschatology through Christology. The presence of the Word, then, can be found now only in the preaching and sacraments of the church, but also in the labor of the worker.

Tyler Atkinson is assistant professor of religion at Bethany College in Lindsborg, Kansas.

The Ammonites: Elites, Empires, and Sociopolitical Chane (1000–500 BCE)

  • Author: Craig W. Tyson
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 312

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This book investigates the archaeological, epigraphic, and biblical evidence for the course of Ammon’s history, setting it squarely within the context of ancient Near Eastern imperialism. Drawing on cross-cultural parallels from the archaeology of empires, Tyson elucidates the dynamic processes by which the local Ammonite elite made the cousins of biblical Israel visible to history. Tyson explains changes in the region of Ammon during the Second Iron Age, namely the increasing numbers of locally produced elite items as well as imports, growth in the use of writing for administrative and display purposes, and larger numbers of sedentary settlements; in the light of the transformative role that the Neo-Assyrian and Neo-Babylonian empires played in the ancient Near East. The study also widens the conversation to consider cross-cultural examples of how empires affect peripheral societies.

Readers who come to this volume for bibliography and discussion of data relevant to ancient Ammon will find Tyson a reliable and insightful guide.

Journal of Theological Studies

Craig W. Tyson is assistant professor of religious studies at D’Youville College in Buffalo, New York. His publications and research interests focus on the social history of the Levant and literary readings of the Hebrew Bible.

Perhaps There Is Hope: Reading Lamentations as a Polyphony of Pain, Penitence, and Protest

  • Author: Miriam J. Bier
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 272

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Perhaps There Is Hope proposes here a strong new understanding of Lamentations, drawing on Bakhtinian ideas of multiple voices to analyse the poetic speaking voices within the text—examining their theological perspectives, and nuancing the interaction between them. Bier scrutinizes interpretations of Lamentations, distinguishing between exegesis that reads Lamentations as a theodicy, in defense of God, and those that read it as an anti-theodicy, in defense of Zion. Rather than reductively adopting either of these approaches, this book advocates a dialogic approach to Lamentations, reading to hear the full polyphony of pain, penitence, and protest.

Miriam J. Bier is lecturer in Old Testament at London School of Theology. She is coeditor of Spiritual Complaint: Theology and Practice of Lament.

“And He Will Take Your Daughters . . .”: Woman Story and the Ethical Evaluation of Monarchy in the David Narrative

  • Author: April Westbrook
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 288

April Westbrook explores the intentional inclusion of woman stories (those displaying significant female presence) within the David narrative in the books of Samuel. These stories are made prominent by the surprisingly high number of their occurrences, as well as the sequentially progressive literary pattern in which they occur in the larger narrative. Westbrook shows that the dramatic and detailed accounts within the story repeatedly challenge the reader to consider the experiences of women and their contribution to the purpose of the larger narrative. When viewed collectively, these woman stories serve to stir the reader's responses in ways which systematically call into question the nature of the monarchy itself as a power system—both its impact upon the nation and upon the kings who rule.

Although King David is often held up as a paragon of virtue, the experiences of the women in his life frequently reveal a different side of his character, and the reader must wrestle with the resultant ambiguity. In the process, the reader must also think deeply about the inevitably negative aspects of hierarchical social structures and why this biblical text is apparently designed to press the reader toward unavoidable and uncomfortable personal confrontation with these realities concerning the use of power within community life.

April Westbrook is professor of Old Testament at Vanguard University.

Going Up and Going Down: A Key to Interpreting Jacob's Dream (Gen 28.10–22)

  • Author: Yitzhak Peleg
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 312

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In Going Up and Going Down Yitzhak Peleg argues that the story of Jacob’s dream (Genesis 28:10–22), functions as a mise en abyme—a smaller object that reflects a larger structure. Close examination reveals that focusing on the vision of Jacob’s dream and understanding it as a symbolic dream facilitates an explanation of the dream and its meaning.

Scholars have historically classified the dream as theophany, the purpose of which is to explain how Beth-El became a sacred place, and as such the vision in Jacob's dream is generally accepted as merely ornamental, or even lacking a message in itself. Whilst Peleg does not contradict or seek to go against identification of the dream as theophany, he sees a more nuanced purpose behind its presentation. Peleg’s proposal is that the description of the vision, and especially that of the movement of the angels, is not embellishment, supplementation or scenic background, of God's message, but that it directly symbolizes the path taken by the Patriarchs to and from the Promised Land. Furthermore, the narrative context and visual description in the dream in which “Angels of God were going up and down it” appears when Jacob is on his way to Harran, that is to say, when he is about to leave Israel.

Yitzhak Peleg is senior lecturer and previously head of biblical studies at Beit Berl College, Israel.

Theological Interpretation and Isaiah 53: A Critical Comparison of Bernhard Duhm, Brevard Childs, and Alec Motyer

  • Author: Charles E. Shepherd
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 312

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This study brings together the hermeneutical approaches of three Old Testament scholars, specifically as they pertain to the interpretation of Isaiah 52:13–53:12 in the framework of Christian theology. Contemporary discourse and hermeneutical discussions have led to the development of a point of confusion in theological hermeneutics, focusing on what relationship older frames of reference may have with those more recent. Bernhard Duhm is presented as a history-of-Religion scholar who does not easily abide by popular understandings of that school. Brevard Childs moves outward from particular historical judgments regarding the nature of redaction and form criticism, attempting to arrive at a proximately theological reading of the poem. Alec Motyer’s evangelical commitments represent a large constituency of contemporary theological readership, and a popular understanding of Isaiah 53.

Following a summary and critical engagement of each interpreter on his own terms, the study analyzes the use of rhetoric behind the respective readings of Isaiah 53, and proposes theological reading as a highly eclectic undertaking, distanced from the demarcations of “precritical,” “critical,” and “postcritical.”

Charles E. Shepherd is adjunct lecturer in biblical studies at Cranmer Hall, St. John’s College, Durham University, UK.

The Substance of Psalm 24: An Attempt to Read Scripture after Brevard S. Childs

  • Author: Phillip Sumpter
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 288

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This book contributes to the theory and practice of Biblical interpretation by engaging in an interpretation of Psalm 24 inspired by a particular understanding of Brevard Childs’ “canonical approach”: an understanding centered on the concept of “theological substance.”

Sumpter shows how the literary, historical, and theological dimensions of Psalm 24 cohere into a single vision by reading the text according to the previously discussed dialectic. An initial “synchronic” analysis of the psalm's poetic structure related to a “diachronic” reconstruction of the tradition history that lead to the final form. The question is then posed concerning the primary forces at work in this history of composition, a question which leads to reflection on the Trinity, first in se and then pro nobis. This latter dimension takes us back to the text, as its “Davidic” nature is further analysed in relation to the books of Samuel, the Psalter, and Isaiah. Finally, Patristic exegesis is turned to for further stimulation concerning the mysterious subject matter of the text.

Philip Sumpter did his PhD in Old Testament under Gordon McConville at Gloucestershire University, UK. He currently works at Nazareth Evangelical Theological Seminary in Israel.

Responding to a Puzzled Scribe: The Barberini Version of Habakkuk 3 Analyzed in the Light of the Other Greek Versions

  • Author: Joshua L. Harper
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 336

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In this book, Joshua L. Harper demonstrates that the Barberini version, when compared with the other Greek versions, was originally independent of the Septuagint, but has been influenced by it in transmission. Harper also argues that the Barberini version was probably translated no earlier than the later books of the Septuagint (around the first century BC), and no later than the mid-third century AD. The style, methods of translation, and exegetical affinities suggest that the translator was primarily concerned with producing stylistic, understandable Greek rather than with conforming closely to the Hebrew source text.

Harper also provides text, translation, and notes for the major Greek versions. He analyzes the Barberini version in particular detail, with regard to lexical and syntactical translation technique, as well as matters of style.

Joshua L. Harper is lecturer in Old Testament and biblical languages at Africa International University, Nairobi, Kenya.

Poets, Prophets, an Texts in Play: Studies in Biblical Poetry and Prophecy in Honour of Francis Landy

  • Editors: Ehud Ben Zvi, Claudia V. Camp, David M. Gunn, and Aaron W. Hughes
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 296

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In this volume, a list of esteemed scholars engage with the literary readings of prophetic and poetic texts in the Hebrew Bible that revolve around sensitivity to the complexity of language, the fragility of meaning, and the interplay of texts. These themes are discussed using a variety of hermeneutical strategies.

In Part 1, Poets and Poetry, essays address the nature of poetic language itself, while others play with themes of love, beauty, and nature in specific poetic texts. The essays in Part 2, Prophets and Prophecy, consider prophets and prophecy from a number of interpretive directions, moving from internal literary analysis to the reception of these texts and their imagery in a range of ancient and modern contexts. Those in Part 3, on the other hand, Texts in Play, take more recent works (from Shakespeare to Tove Jansson’s Moomin books for children) as their point of departure, developing conversations between texts across the centuries that enrich the readings of both the ancient and modern pieces of literature.

Ehud Ben Zvi is professor of ancient history at the University of Alberta, Canada. He is the author of A Historical-Critical Study of the Book of Zephaniah, A Historical-Critical Study of the Book of Obadiah, and Signs of Jonah: Reading and Rereading in Ancient Yehud.

Claudia V. Camp is professor of religion at Texas Christian University. She is the author of Wise, Strange and Holy: The Strange Woman and the Making of the Bible.

David M. Gunn is A.A. Bradford Professor of Religion at Texas Christian University.

Aaron W. Hughes is the Philip S. Bernstein chair in the department of religion and classics at the University of Rochester.

Interpreting 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch: International Studies

  • Editors: Gabriele Boccaccini and Jason M. Zurawski
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 240

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In this volume Gabriele Boccaccini and Jason M. Zurawski collect essays from leading international scholars on the books of 4 Ezra and 2 Baruch. The literature of the Second Temple Period has become increasingly studied in recent years as scholars have begun to recognize the importance of these texts for a developed understanding of Rabbinic and Christian origins.

Through close readings of the texts themselves, examining the books in comparison with other Jewish apocalyptic literature and early Christian materials, and reading the texts in light of their social and historical settings, the fifteen papers collected herein significantly advance the current scholarly conversation on these defining Jewish apocalypses written at the end of the first century CE, and they shed light on the everlasting legacy of apocalyptic ideas in both Christianity and Judaism.

The essays in this collection are an excellent contribution to the ongoing discussion of these two important Second Temple apocalypses.

—Phillip J. Long, instructor of biblical languages, Grace Bible College

Gabriele Boccaccini is professor of Second Temple Judaism and early rabbinic literature at the University of Michigan. She is the coeditor of Enoch and the Mosaic Torah: The Evidence of Jubilees and the author of Beyond the Essene Hypothesis: The Parting of the Ways between Qumran and Enochic Judaism.

Jason M. Zurawski is a PhD candidate in Second Temple Judaism at the University of Michigan. His research focuses on Jewish Hellenistic literature and Jewish paideia during the Second Temple period.

Josephus’ Interpretation of the Book of Samuel

  • Author: Michael Avioz
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 272

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Since the 70s, no study has examined the methodologies of Josephus’ rewriting of an entire biblical book as part of his Judean Antiquities. This book attempts to fill this vacuum by exploring Josephus’ adaptation of the books of Samuel, penetrating the exegetical strategies he employs to modify the biblical stories for his intended audience. Through meticulous comparison of the biblical narrative and Josephus’ Antiquities, broader issues—such as Josephus’ attitude towards monarchy and women—gradually come to light, challenging long-held assumptions. This definitive exploration of Josephus’ rewriting of Samuel illuminates the encounter between the ancient texts and its relevance to scholarly discourse today.

Michael Avioz is an associate professor teaching in the department of Bible at Bar-Ilan University in Israel.

The Body in Biblical, Christian and Jewish Texts

  • Editor: Joan E. Taylor
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 296

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The body is an entity on which religious ideology is printed. Thus it is frequently a subject of interest, anxiety, prescription and regulation in both the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, as well as in early Christian and Jewish writings. Issues such as the body’s age, purity, sickness, ability, gender, sexual actions, marking, clothing, modesty or placement can revolve around what the body is and is not supposed to be or do.

The Body in Biblical, Christian and Jewish Texts comprises a range of interdisciplinary and creative explorations of the body as it is described and defined in religious literature, with chapters largely written by new scholars with fresh perspectives. This is a subject with wide and important repercussions in diverse cultural contexts today.

This is not only an important volume but also a quite enjoyable read with interesting and sometimes surprising insights.

Review of Biblical Literature

Joan E. Taylor is the prize-winning author of Christians and the Holy Places, and a leading authority on the Jewish world of Jesus, including women within that world. She is professor of Christian origins and Second Temple Judaism at King’s College London.

Genesis in the New Testament

  • Editors: Maarten J.J. Menken, Steve Moyise
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 200

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Genesis in the New Testament brings together a set of specially commissioned studies by experts in the field. After an introductory chapter on the use of Genesis in the Dead Sea Scrolls and second temple literature, each of the New Testament books that contain quotations from Genesis are discussed: Matthew, Mark, Luke-Acts, John, Paul, Deutero-Paul, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter and Jude, Revelation.

The book provides an overview of the status, role and function of Genesis in the first century. It considers the Greek and Hebrew manuscript traditions and offers insights into the various hermeneutical stances of the New Testament authors and the development of New Testament theology. The book follows on from acclaimed volumes considering Isaiah, Deuteronomy and the Minor Prophets in a similar manner.

Maarten J. J. Menken is professor of New Testament exegesis on the faculty of Catholic theology at the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. He is also the coauthor of Psalms in the New Testament.

Steve Moyise is visiting professor at Newman University, UK, and author of Jesus and Scripture, The Old Testament in the New, and Paul and Scripture.