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Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought Collection (13 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

Study humanity’s diverse response to life and faith’s greatest questions with these innovative academic volumes. Gorgias’ Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought series gathers original scholarship that promotes idea sharing and broadens perspectives across these wide-ranging fields. See how understanding dreams, prophecy, and the afterlife have influenced civilizations, and how a single word split the Christian church with studies from Michael Thephilos, Ilaria Ramelli, and a host of other scholars. The authors emphasize the historical context and interaction of different theistic and philosophical traditions, providing both detailed studies and a bird’s-eye view of religion and philosophy’s growth through history.

In the Logos editions, these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Connect the dots on your timeline with Classic Studies on the Philosophy of Religion, and dive into the heritage of religious studies and philosophy.

Key Features

  • Includes 13 academic volumes studying the development of religion and philosophy in human history
  • Emphasizes contributions from young scholars
  • Analyzes how dreams, prophecy, and the afterlife have influenced civilizations

Individual Titles

As Below, So Above: Apocalypticism, Gnoticism, and the Scribes of Qumran and Nag Hammadi

  • Author: Glen Fairen
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 202

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Explore alternative perspectives on the early history of Gnosticism and Christianity by comparing the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Library.

Examining the academic discourse surrounding these ancient collections, Glen Fairen argues that scholars have unjustly used the “Apocalyptic” Dead Sea Scrolls to determine what is legitmately Christian and the “Gnostic” Nag Hammadi Library to determine what is not. Fairen argues scholars have created a false narrative in which Christianity inherits the salvific history of ancient Israel. He argues this results in two false conclusions: Christianity is linked to the prestigious pedigree of Judaism via apocalypticism, and Gnosticism quarantines “heretical” expressions that threaten Christianity’s uniqueness.

Exploring the socio-political context of the Ancient Near and Middle East, Fairen argues that the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi Library are not diametrically opposed, but linked by a shared Enochic worldview.

Glen Fairen is a professor of religious studies at the University of Alberta.

Elements of Cultural Continuity in Modern German Literature: A Study of Goethe, Nietzche, and Mann

  • Author: Ramona Simut
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Understand the preeminent German thinkers of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries: Goethe, Nietzsche, and Thomas Mann and examine their attitude towards the arts, society, and politics of their times. Ramona Simut surveys the historical context of these three centuries and their importance to the cultural and social development of modern Germany and Europe in general. Simut also analyzes the key thoughts of Goethe, Nietzsche, and Thomas Mann in detail. She finds their thought is interconnected and still relevant to the pressing questions of today’s society.

Ramona Simut is associate professor of language and literature at Emanuel University of Oradea, Romania.

God and Man in History: The Influence of Jakob Böhme and G. W. F. Hegel on Ferdinand Christian Baur’s Philosophical Understanding of Religion as Gnosis

  • Author: Corneliu C. Simut
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 2013

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Learn about the founder of the Tübingen School of theology and leader in historical criticism, Ferdinand Christian Baur. Cornielu C. Simut investigates Baur’s influences, including the idea of history, Hegel's philosophy, and Böhme’s “theosophy.” Simut shows how Baur draws on Hegel and Bohme to lay the foundation for liberal theology, and decisively contributes to the development of non-traditional approaches to Christian theology.

Corneliu C. Simut earned his PhD from the University of Aberdeen and his ThD from the University of Tilburg. He is professor of modern and contemporary theology at Emanuel University of Oradea, Romania.

Greek Tradition and Latin Influence in the Work of George Scholarios: “Alone against All of Europe”

  • Author: Christopher Livanos
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 164

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Study the work and career of the first ecumenical patriarch of the Orthodox Church during Ottoman Rule, George Scholarios. “An intellectual enigma awaiting modern scholarly investigation,” Scholarios was an unusual blending of Eastern and Western Christianity. Scholarios played an important role in East-West dialogues, including the Council of Ferrara-Florence in 1438 and 39.

Christopher Livanos looks afresh at some of the cultural misunderstandings that took place at the Council and related dialogues. Modern scholars have long acknowledged that Byzantine and Western theology held very different views on doctrines as important as atonement and original sin, yet fifteenth-century theologians and diplomats did not address these issues. Livanos attempts to understand this discrepancy between how modern scholars have described the fifteenth century and how people in the fifteenth century viewed themselves.

Christopher Livanos is associate professor of comparative literature at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Jesus as New Moses in Matthew 8–9

  • Author: Michael Theophilos
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 230

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume explores the fascinating narrative structure and thematic elements of Matthew 8–9 which present Jesus as the “New-Moses,” leading his people out of exile. After surveying modern scholarship on Mosaic typology in Matthew, Michael Theophilos presents a comprehensive survey of primary source literature as it pertains to Mosaic recollection in the ancient world. Theophilos concludes by exploring the possible rationale and motivation for Matthew’s typological association of Jesus with Moses.

Michael Theophilos is a lecturer in biblical studies and ancient languages at the Australian Catholic University.

Jonathan Edwards’ Social Augustinian Trinitarianism in Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

  • Author: Steven Studebaker
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 314

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Trinity played a significant role in Jonathan Edwards’ theology. But what was the nature of his trinitarian theology? A common view among Edwards scholars is that he embraced the dialectical, psychological, and social models of the Trinity. These scholars argue that the heart of his thought was his social model of the Trinity, which rejects the Western tradition.

Steven Studebaker argues that Edwards consistently used one model of the Trinity: the Augustinian mutual love model. Studebaker uses a historical-theological method, in contrast to the predominantly systematic-theological approaches that tend to interpret his thought in terms of popular metanarratives. Studebaker goes on to show how Edwards uses the mutual love model to portray the loving relationships among the divine persons, and in doing so stands in continuity with other early-Enlightenment apologists for traditional trinitarianism.

Steven M. Studebaker is assistant professor of systematic and historical theology at McMaster Divinity College.

Late Antique Motifs in Yezidi Oral Tradition

  • Author: Eszter Spät
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 580

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Yezidis are a Kurdish-speaking religious minority of a few hundred thousand people, living mainly in Northern Iraq, as well as Syria, Turkey and the Caucasus. Yezidis follow a highly syncretistic religion of their own, based exclusively on oral tradition. Yezidi mythology, besides showing the influence of both Sufism and a pre-Zoroastrian Western Iranian mythology, has also incorporated and adapted to its particular religious system certain myths and motifs which once enjoyed widespread popularity among the interrelated religious movements of Late Antiquity, ranging from Judaism through Christianity to Gnosticism and Manichaeism.

These myths and motifs, though long since relegated to oblivion in the West, can be found in the religious lore of the Yezidis, as well as of numerous other groups, both medieval and contemporary, in the Middle East. Eszter Spät argues they are the vestiges of a common cultural substratum once shared by the people of the region. Placing these motifs within the context of a religious language originating in Late Antiquity is not only the key to a better understanding of Yezidi religion, but also to the way it developed and the working of oral tradition in the Middle East in general. In this context, establishing the late antique origins of some motifs reveals the way literacy interacted with orality in the region. Furthermore, Spät argues that it highlights the long lasting influence late antique religious thought had on the development of religious imagery and thinking in the area.

Eszter Spät is a research fellow in the department of medieval studies at Central European University.

Psychology of Prophecy in Early Christianity: Prophetism and Religious Altered States of Consciousness

  • Author: Alan Humm
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 290

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Psychology of Prophecy in Early Christianity analyzes early Christian prophetic activity and seeks to understand the psychological states behind it. Alan Humm suggests as system of categories based on the external appearances and subjective claims of modern phenomena. Assuming that the ancients followed the same patterns, Hum reviews and categorizes most instances described in early Christian literature.

Alan Humm earned his PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. He has taught courses in Jewish and Christian literature at several colleges.

Seeing the God: Ways of Envisioning the Divine in Ancient Mediterranean Religion

  • Editor: Jeffrey Pettis
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Jeffrey Pettis collects scholarly essays exploring the concept of how the ancients “envisioned” the deities within various religious traditions, including Judaism, Gnosticism, Syriac Christianity, Byzantium, and Classical Greco-Roman religion and philosophy. The contributors pay specific attention to phenomena such as dreams, day or night-time visions, and initiation rites perceived as mediums of divine encounter.

Jeffrey Pettis is an instructor in religion at Fordham University, Lincoln Center.

Terms for Eternity: Aiônios and Aïdios in Classical and Christian Texts

  • Author: Ilaria Ramelli and David Konstan
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 268

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

What is truly timeless? Ilaria Ramelli and David Konstan explores the language of eternity, and in particular two ancient Greek terms that may bear the sense of “eternal”: aiônios and aïdios. This fascinating linguistic chronicle is marked by several milestones that correspond to the emergence of new perspectives on the nature of eternity. These milestones include the advent of Pre-Socratic physical speculation and the notion of limitless time in ancient philosophy, Plato’s idea of a timeless eternity, and the further development of Pre-Socratic insights by Epicurean and the Stoics.

From the biblical perspective, the intersection of Greek and Hebrew conceptions is reflected in Septuagint, as well as new inflections in popular terminology in the Hellenistic and Roman periods, and in the role of eternity in the theology of the New Testament. Ramelli and Konstan explore the profound cross-fertilization of Christian and classical philosophical conceptions in the works of the Church Fathers and their contemporaries. Christian theology in the first five centuries AD and its choice of vocabulary prove to be most revealing of larger doctrinal commitments. Above all, debate raged on the question of eternal damnation versus the idea of universal salvation. Terminology for “eternity” is often at the core of how these issues were debated, and helps to identify which writers inclined to one or the other view of the matter.

Ilaria Ramelli holds two masters degrees in early Christianity and history of philosophy, a PhD in Classics, and a postdoctorate in late antiquity. She received two Agostino Gemelli Awards (1996, 1997) for the best Catholic-University graduate, and the 2006 Marcello Gigante Classics International Award. She has been professor of history of the Roman Near East, and assistant of history of ancient philosophy since 2003 at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan, as well as senior research fellow in ancient and patristic philosophy at Durham University.

David Konstan is the John Rowe Workman Distinguished Professor of Classics and Humanistic Tradition and professor of comparative literature at Brown University.

The Coming of the Impassible God: Tracing a Dilemma in Christian Theology

  • Author: Joseph Hallman
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Joseph Hallman tells a theological story about how the Christian understanding of God developed from the second to the eighth century, as witnessed by major theologians of the Christian tradition. Philosophers held that God could not change or suffer. Christian apologists in the second and third century defended belief in the Incarnation against philosophers with whom they shared a similar view of the divine being.

Hallman argues that the insight of Athanasius in the fourth century caused a shift: unless Christ is divine we cannot be saved. The council of Nicea dogmatized this view. Another great Alexandrian, Cyril, argued that the word made flesh truly experienced all things human, including suffering on the cross. Because of the early influence of Platonism in Christian theology, these insights created a theological dilemma for the Fathers captured in various Christological heresies. Since the divine by nature cannot suffer, how are we to conceive of the Incarnation? Can the Son of God truly suffer? Can a suffering logos be fully divine? In the West, Tertulllian, then Augustine raised similar questions. For Augustine, Christians believe in a deus humilis, a humble God unknown to philosophers. The story is finally brought to a resounding conclusion in the work of Maximus the Confessor, who is the last and greatest patristic Christological writer. By carefully constructing an apophatic theology of Christ, Maximus refutes the final Christological heresies and resolves the dilemma of divine suffering.

Joseph M. Hallman is emeritus professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota. He has written extensively on the Christology of the Early Fathers and the question of divine suffering.

The Dreams and Visions of Aelius Aristides

  • Author: John Stephens
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 168

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Greco-Roman sophist Aelius Aristides was a member of the Helenistic cult of Asclepius. In his diary, Sacred Tales, Aristides presents a first-person account of the multitude of nocturnal and waking dream-visions and miraculous healings that took place in his life while belonging to this cult. An examination of Aristides’ religiosity, especially the accounts of the dream-visions and spiritual healings recorded in his dream diary, sheds light upon the spiritual environment of the Roman world in the first and second centuries AD. Furthermore, it elucidates some of the reasons behind Christianity's appeal to the pagan masses, especially among the educated Roman upper classes to which Aristides belonged.

John Stephens argues that Aristides is an example of homo religiosus, and that the Sacred Tales should be seen as a religious document. This approach highlights the religious dimension of the text. Rather than explain away Aristides’ religious experiences, this book incorporates a variety of methodological approaches in order to identify and elucidate the many socio-historical and psychological factors affecting the nature of Aristides’ religiosity and its symbolic articulation in textual form. Paying attention to the religious dimension of the text and using an interdisciplinary perspective reveals Aristides as less neurotic and eccentric as many have supposed him to be.

John Stephens received his PhD in religious studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research focuses on ancient dream literature.

The Filioque Impasse: Patristic Roots

  • Author: Michelle Coetzee
  • Series: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 286

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Michelle Coetzee focuses on the underlying causes of the filioque impasse, which remains one of the greatest obstacles to the re-establishment of communion between the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics. She argues that there has been a great deal of misunderstanding of the positions of each tradition by the other, partly due to the fact that East and West imbue certain key words, such as ‘person’ and ‘unity,’ with different meanings. Underlying this difficulty is the problem of divergent approaches to theology, leading to differing responses to the Church’s interaction with ancient Hellenic philosophy in the fourth century and divergent expositions of the Trinity. Against this backdrop, Coetzee sets about clearing up some of the misunderstandings. But choices still need to be made and, in Coetzee’s view, these must ultimately be made on the basis of approach to theology and truth criteria.

Michelle Coetzee earned her DPhil in theology from St. Augustine College, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Product Details

  • Title: Perspectives on Philosophy and Religious Thought Collection (13 vols.)
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Volumes: 13
  • Pages: 3,684