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Overview

Add 29 volumes of cutting edge research to your library with the Gorgias Biblical Studies Collection, including theological, historical, literary, cultural, and social-scientific studies. Gorgias specializes in bringing promising young voices to the fore, whose works have been rigorously tested. Selections from the Biblical Intersections Series explore the Bible as a window into the ancient world, with insight into ancient women, social identity, and economics. And the Gorgias Handbooks are designed to inspire and support other scholarly work, providing concise, scholarly introductions to topics in biblical studies ranging from linguistics to textual criticism.

In the Logos editions, these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Includes studies on history, theology, literary criticism, and social-scientific
  • Emphasizes contributions from young scholars
  • Explores the Bible as a window into the ancient world
  • Offers concise, scholarly introductions to topics in biblical studies

Individual Titles

A Brief Introduction to the Semitic Languages

  • Author: Aaron D. Rubin
  • Series: Gorgias Handbooks
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 110

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume provides an overview of the Semitic language family, including both ancient and modern languages. After introducing the history of the family and its internal classification, Aaron D. Rubin covers topics in phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicon.

Rubin’s clear presentation makes this volume useful not only to those in the field of Semitic linguistics, but also to the general linguist or language enthusiast who wishes to learn something about this important language family.

Aaron D. Rubin earned his PhD in Near Eastern Languages from Harvard and is a professor of Hebrew, Aramaic, and Arabic language and literature at Penn State University.

A Call to Covenant Love: Text Grammar and Literary Strucutre in Deuteronomy 5–11

  • Author: Jason S. DeRouchie
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 432

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Targeting the exegete, A Call to Covenant Love offers a clear method for establishing flow of thought, text hierarchy, and literary macrostructure in biblical Hebrew prose. The study contributes both to hermeneutical theory and to the study of Deuteronomy by arguing for the application of discourse linguistics alongside stylistic and semantic analysis in the interpretation of Old Testament texts. It is distinct from most other text linguistic studies in its attention to reported direct speech. It also includes a brief literary-structural and theological commentary on Deuteronomy 5–11 that models the text grammatical approach.

A Call to Covenant Love clearly and passionately articulates the lasting message of one of the Old Testament’s most foundational sections, extending the original call to life-encompassing surrender into the present age.

Jason S. DeRouchie earned his PhD from the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is assistant professor of Old Testament studies at Northwestern College, Saint Paul, Minnesota. He is also the coauthor of A Modern Grammar for Biblical Hebrew.

A Redaction History of the Pentateuch Targums

  • Author: Gudrun Elisabeth Lier
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 311

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Combining Targum studies with Judaic studies, Gudrun Lier assigns each Targum (Fragment Targum [Recension P, MS Paris 110], Neofiti 1, Onqelos and Pseudo-Jonathan) to a its particular “Sitz im Leben” (setting in life). She stresses the close connection between Targum and Midrash literature, and challenges the assumption that all extant Targums were compiled for the Synagogue.

Gudrun Elisabeth Lier is a lecturer in religion studies at the University of Johannesburg. She specializes in the translation and interpretation of Targums, and talmudic and midrashic texts.

A Short Introduction to the Tiberian Masoretic Bible and its Reading Tradition

  • Author: Geoffrey Khan
  • Series: Gorgias Handbooks
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 126

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This book introduces the Tiberian Masoretic tradition of the Hebrew Bible and its background. It was this tradition that produced the great Masoretic codexes of the Middle Ages, which form the basis of modern printed editions of the Hebrew Bible. The presentation gives particular prominence to the multilayered nature of the Masoretic tradition. Particular attention is given to the Tiberian reading tradition, which is essential for a correct understanding of the Tiberian vocalization system.

Geoffrey Khan is regius professor of Hebrew at the University of Cambridge. He was elected fellow of the British Academy in 1998 and honorary fellow of the Academy of the Hebrew Languages in 2011. In 2004 he was awarded the Lidzbarski Gold Medal for Semitic philology.

Abortion and the Apostolate: A Study in Pauline Conversion, Rhetoric, and Scholarship

  • Author: Matthew W. Mitchell
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 263

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Matthew W. Mitchell examines the origins of Paul’s mission to the Gentiles through a close study of his claims to have been personally commissioned to undertake such a mission by Jesus. However, Mitchell argues that it is the rejection of Paul’s claims to be an apostle in the same sense as the other apostles that ultimately underlies his “mission to the Gentiles.” He carefully analyzes Paul’s references to his conversion in Galatians 1:15–17 and 1 Corinthians 15:8, paying particular attention to Paul’s evocative use of the language of abortion. The contextualization of this curious self-description in 1 Corinthians 15:8 draws upon a growing body of work concerning an area of ancient life that continues to fascinate and perplex moderns: the exposure of unwanted infants.

Matthew W. Mitchell earned his PhD in religion from Temple University, Philadelphia. He is an associate professor at Canisius College.

Anthropology and the Bible: Critical Perspectives

  • Editor: Emanuel Pfoh
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 179

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

These papers foster critical uses of social anthropology for reading biblical scholarship and ancient Near Eastern studies related to the Bible. The contributors stand as a critical renewal of the uses of anthropology and sociology in biblical scholarship in distinction to social-scientific approaches. Among the diverse set of contributors are David Chalcraft, Anne Katrine Gudme, Niels Peter Lemche, Philippe Guillaume, Eveline van der Steen, Philippe Wajdenbaum, and the editor, Emanuel Pfoh.

Emanuel Pfoh earned his PhD in history from the University of Buenos Aires and teaches history at National University of La Plata.

Between Law and Narrative: The Method and Function of Abstraction

  • Author: Bernon P. Lee
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 326

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Aside from representing speeches by biblical characters, how do passages of laws in the Pentateuch interact with the surrounding narratives? Bernon P. Lee proposes that certain passages of law in Leviticus and Numbers offer direction for the interpretation of adjacent segments of narrative. This direction, Lee argues, may serve to emphasize select themes and concepts in narrative, and suggest alternative options for interpreting narrative.

Bernon P. Lee is professor of biblical and theological studies at Bethel University, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Dischronology and Dialogic in the Bible’s Primary Narrative

  • Author: David A. Bergen
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 234

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Dischronology and Dialogic in the Bible’s Primary Narrative reassesses deuteronomy from a narrative theory perspective. Concerned for the long-term viability of his people, Moses legislates a public reading of his document which is deposited next to the Ark of the Covenant as a national testament. Through the mechanics of narrative mediation, the narrator reveals to the reader of Deuteronomy the contents of Moses’ enshrined publication. Deuteronomy’s simulcast of Moses’ book invites external readers to compare and evaluate their readings with the characters who access the same text within the narrative.

Dischronology and Dialogic highlights the dialogic struggle between Moses and God over the welfare of Israel’s relationship with land and landlord.

David A. Bergen is an instructor in religious studies at the University of Calgary.

Drought, Famine, Plague and Pestilence: Ancient Israel’s Understandings of and Responses to Natural Catastrophes

  • Author: Warren C. Robertson
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 210

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This interdisciplinary study integrates textual analysis of the Hebrew Bible and comparable ancient Near Eastern material with social theory and archaeology. Warren C. Robertson articulates the ancient Israelites’ taken-for-granted understandings of natural disasters, their intellectual and theological challenges to those understandings, and their intellectual and theological reconstructions of those events

 

Warren C. Robertson is an assistant professor of biblical studies at the Gardner Webb University School of Divinity.

Eve: The Unbearable Flaming Fire

  • Editors: Mishael M. Caspi and John T. Greene
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 182

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This anthology on Eve brings together an international group of scholars to discuss how this biblical character has been interpreted and commented upon by students of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In an age when the history of women is being reassessed, it is quite natural that Western women especially turn their thoughts to one of the paradigmatic female figures in our culture. This broad treatment of Eve covers a wide range of thoughts about her role as mother of our race, victim, stooge, wife, companion, independent thinker, curious life form, and “helper.”

Mishael M. Caspi was professor of religion and Middle East civilization at Bates College, Lewiston, Maine. He was a leader in the American Association of Professors of Hebrew and a co-convener of the Seminar in Biblical Characters in Three traditions.

John T. Greene is professor emeritus of religious studies at Michigan State University.

Exegesis in the Targum of Psalms: The Old, the New, and the Rewritten

  • Author: Timothy Edwards
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 300

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The first book-length study focusing on the Targum of Psalms in more than 50 years. Timothy Edwards focuses on the exegetical aspects of the Targum through a detailed study of 15 psalms and examines how the Targum relates to other Jewish and Christian exegetical traditions that have drawn upon the book of Psalms. Edwards portrays the Targum as a link between the written and oral Torah that leads its readers on a path to tradition.

Timothy Edwards earned his DPhil from Oxford and is an instructor at the Oxford Center for Hebrew and Jewish Studies.

Further Biblical Hebrew: Explanations and Exercises

  • Author: Fiona Blumfield
  • Series: Gorgias Handbooks
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 363

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Move from basic to advanced Hebrew grammar with Fiona Blumfield’s Further Biblical Hebrew. Designed for students who have completed at least one year of college study in biblical Hebrew, this text draws on recent works of grammar, and the grammatical comments of the medieval Jewish exegetes to elucidate the ecomplexities of the Hebrew language.

Fiona Blumfield is a lecturer in biblical Hebrew at University College London. She earned her PhD in Jewish Studies from London University and has taught in London for more than 25 years.

In the Arms of Biblical Women

  • Editors: John T. Greene and Mishael M. Caspi
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 346

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume surveys the way biblical writers present female characters in their narratives. In almost every story involving a famous man, one finds that a woman plays an important role also. There is Isaac without Sarah; no Ishmael without Hagar; no Moses without his sister and the Egyptian princess; no Barak without Deborah; no David without Bathsheba; and no Ahab without Jezebel. Readers will appreciate the breadth of discussion contained in these essays, and will revisit them often in her/his reading interests.

Mishael M. Caspi was professor of religion and Middle East civilization at Bates College, Lewiston, Maine. He was a leader in the American Association of Professors of Hebrew and a co-convener of the Seminar in Biblical Characters in Three traditions.

John T. Greene is professor emeritus of religious studies at Michigan State University.

Introduction to the Grammar of Hebrew Poetry in Byzantine Palestine

  • Author: Michael Rand
  • Series: Gorgias Studies in Language and Linguistics
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 564

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Michael Rand investigates a corpus of several thousand lines of poetry, selected from the oeuvre of Eleazar be-rabbi Qillir—a liturgical poet whose period of activity dates to the early seventh century AD. This work provides a grammar devoted Eleazar’s poem, and then examines its literary features, highlighting the poem’s structure, lexicon, and aesthetics.

Michael Rand is a fellow of the Shalom Spiegel Institute of Medieval Hebrew Poetry at the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Issues in Luke-Acts: Selected Essays

  • Authors: Sean A. Adams and Michael Pahl
  • Series: Gorgias Handbooks
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 356

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This volume introduces and engages with the major critical issues in the study of Luke and Acts. This holistic overture addresses fundamental questions such as authorship, dating, textual concerns, sources, speeches, literary form, historical value, and theological issues.

Sean A. Adams is a fellow of New Testament and Jewish Greek Literature at the University of Edinburgh School of Divinity.

Michael Pahl is the lead pastor of Morden Mennonite Church in Canada and was formerly associate professor of theological studies at Cedarville University, US.

Moses, David and the High Kingship of Yahweh: A Canonical Study of Book IV of the Psalter

  • Author: Michael G. McKelvey
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 382

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Has the Old Testament Psalter been purposefully arranged? Does this arrangement convey an overall message? This book enters into the growing discussion regarding the canonical arrangement of the Psalms by examining Book 4 (Psalms 90-106) and considering the book’s overall theological and thematic message within the literary context of the Psalter.

Michael G. McKelvey is assistant professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi.

Narratology and the Pentateuch Targums: A Methodological Experiment

  • Author: Simon Lasair
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 220

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In this innovative book, Simon Lasair explores the potential of applying narratology to the Pentateuch Targums. Using the coherence of the texts, he examines passages such as Genesis 39 in Targum Pseudo-Jonathan and Numbers 12 in Targum Neofiti, among others. Lasair argues that when the targums present coherent narratives, they largely carry the major structures of the Pentateuch over into an Aramaic context. In the finer details the targumic narratives take on their distinct nuances, and have the effect of altering the narrative dynamics of the narratives that are being rendered targumically. Lasair calls for a wide ranging rethink of the methodologies used to study targumic literature, as well as how to place the targums within their original historical contexts.

Simon Lasair is adjunct Professor of History at St. Thomas More College in Saskatoon, Canada. He holds a PhD in Middle Eastern Studies from the University of Manchester.

Opening Heaven’s Floodgates

  • Editor: Jason M. Silverman
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 548

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The narrative of Noah’s flood in Genesis draws perennial interest from scholars and the general public. Too often, however, historical and exegetical studies of the text, the story’s reception, and discussion of theological appropriation remain aloof from each other, if not at odds. This volume takes the influential nature of the flood story as an ideal opportunity to bring some of these methods into dialogue.

Opening Heaven’s Floodgates offers 16 new essays on the Noahic flood from international scholars. Balanced between textual, historical, comparative, and theological approaches, each essay’s new perspectives on the flood narrative are drawn together with an introduction focusing on the themes of myth and reception. Two critical responses to the collection by Walter Brueggemann and Philip Davies identify the significance of this new research and suggest areas for further exploration.

Jason M. Silverman earned his PhD in religions and theology from Trinity College Dublin. He is a researcher in Assyriology at the Leiden University Institute for Area Studies.

Portraits of a King Favored by God: David the King: God’s Poet, Warrior, and Statesman

  • Editors: Mishael M. Caspi and John T. Greene
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 269

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Editors Michael Caspi and John Greene bring together essays by archaeologists, epigraphers, and historians to study as a writer, political figure, and military leader. The contributions have been edited and sequenced in such a way that the combined information tell the most recent and chronological story of David.

Caspi and Greene add a prolegomenon which frames the entire work, as well as essays of their own. Thus, all of the major lines of scholarly inquiry—biblical, historical, archaeological—have been given voice in a work that approaches King David from viewpoints expressed in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Sean A. Adams is a fellow of New Testament and Jewish Greek Literature at the University of Edinburgh School of Divinity.

Michael Pahl is the lead pastor of Morden Mennonite Church in Canada and was formerly associate professor of theological studies at Cedarville University, US.

ReReading the Prophets through Corporate Globalization: A Cultural-Evolutionary Approach to Economic Injustice in the Hebrew Bible

  • Author: Matthew J.M. Coomber
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 343

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

ReReading the Prophets Through Corporate Globalization offers a fresh approach to understanding Judah’s eight century prophetic pronouncements against economic exploitation.

Building upon Marvin Chaney’s and D.N. Premnath’s theory that prophetic complaints against landownership abuse reflect such a shift during Judah’s absorption into the Assyrian trade-nexus, this book explores the interpretive value of the presence of these patterns in corporate globalization. While the modern economic system is vastly different from its Iron Age counterpart, the wounds that it inflicts appear to be similar, allowing for new questions and meaning to be drawn from biblical texts that have been reluctant to give up their secrets.

This very interesting and wide-ranging work not only offers new readings of land misuse in Isaiah and Micah, it probes more thoroughly than any study hitherto into the possible range of social contexts and social-group interests that lie behind these texts. Coomber clearly conveys his ability to integrate different academic disciplines for exegetical ends and for making important advances in sociological approaches to biblical studies.

—David Chalcraft, chair of biblical studies, University of Sheffield

This nuanced and welcome study makes a significant contribution to an area where relatively few dare to tread: ancient Near Eastern and biblical economics. Coomber is fully aware of the hermeneutical challenges and potential snares that are involved with comparative approaches of this kind and his use of economic theories, sociology, and patterns of agrarian life show his attentiveness to these issues.

—Roland Boer, associate professor, University of Newcastle, Australia

Coomber covers some crucial areas in socio-economic history on the macro- and micro- levels. This book is (rightly) ambitious and much broader in scope than standard biblical studies books and will be of value beyond Hebrew Bible/Old Testament studies. It is clearly written, well argued, and creative. Anyone with a genuine concern for global justice in relation to the Bible needs to read this impressive book.

—James Crossley, professor of biblical studies, University of Sheffield

Matthew J.M. Coomber is assistant professor of theology at St. Ambrose University.

Scepticism and Ironic Correlations in the Joy Statements of Qoholeth?

  • Author: William H.U. Anderson
  • Series: Series Title (Series Abbreviation)
  • Publisher: Eerdmans, not William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 211

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In this volume, William H.U. Anderson responds to the popular counter-reading of Ecclesiastes in the 1980s and 90s as a book of “joy.” It examines the seven “joy statements” of Qoheleth in great detail: linguistically, form critically, in immediate and overall context, and in the light of analogies with scepticism and irony. Irony, like scepticism, induces doubt and questions.

William H.U. Anderson is associate professor of religious studies at Concordia University College of Alberta, the director of the Canadian Center for Scholarship and the Christian Faith, and editor in chief of the Canadian Journal for Scholarship and the Christian Faith.

Social Identity in Nahum: A Theological-Ethical Enquiry

  • Author: Jan Petrus Bosman
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 304

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Jan Petrus Bosman studies the theological-ethical question of social identity and intergroup conflict in the book of Nahum. Bosman reads Nahum multidimensionally (combining synchrony and diachrony) as part of the “Book of the Twelve,” and incorporates social identity theory, self-categorization theory, and an ideological-critical sensitivity. Bosman develops a theological-ethical model, which combines the role of identity in ethics, the concept of “natural law”, the responsibility ethics of Levinas, and a focus on liberation, for interpreting Nahum’s “Oracles Concerning the Nations.”

Jan Petrus Bosman has researched and lectured at the department of Old and New Testament at the University of Stellenbosch, and at the department of Old Testament at the Philips Universität Marburg in Germany.

Speaking on the Brink of Sheol

  • Authors: Bryan Howard Cribb and Daniel I. Block
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 362

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Bryan H. Cribb’s significant contribution to form-critical analysis, Speaking on the Brink of Sheol, demonstrates that form criticism still has much to add to Old Testament studies. Using a synchronic and inductive approach to the text, Cribb engages in a form critical study of nine “death stories” in the Old Testament. In so doing, he not only provides substantial support for the existence of this genre, but also shows how remarkably fruitful such a study can be in revealing the messages of these accounts.

Bryan Howard Cribb is associate professor of Christian studies at the Anderson University College of Christian Studies.

Daniel I. Block is Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College.

Studies on Magic and Divination in the Biblical World

  • Editors: Helen R. Jacobus, Anne Katrine de Hemmer Gudme, and Philippe Guillaume
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 330

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This collection of essays represents a wide ranging, analytical, and often unconventional approach to a relatively neglected area within Biblical Studies. New and established scholars examine Mesopotamian demonology, Akkadian literary influences, exorcism, healing, calendars, astrology, bibliomancy, dreams, ritual magic, priestly divination, prophecy, magic in the Christian Apocrypha and the New Testament, magic in rabbinic literature, and Jewish Aramaic magic bowls.

Helen R. Jabobus is an honorary research associate at University College London.

Anne Katrine de Hemmer Gudme is assistant professor of Hebrew Bible at the University of Copenhagen.

Philippe Guillaume is privatdozent at the University of Berne.

The Book of Lamentations and the Social World of Judah in the Neo-Babylonian Era

  • Author: Lauress Wilkins
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 277

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Using a form of social-historical criticism, Lauress Wilkins provides a counter-reading of Lamentations that elucidates the impact and aftermath of Babylon’s siege warfare on Judah’s peasants. Wilkins considers the rhetoric of Lamentations, ancient Near Eastern writings, and archaeological evidence, along with analogous social models from other agrarian societies. Together, these shed light on the changing social dynamics, religious customs, and political and economic structures of rural and urban Judah in the sixth century BC.

Lauress Wilkins is associate professor of philosophy and religious studes at Regis College, Massachusetts.

The Coups of Hazael and Jehu: Building an Historical Narrative

  • Author: D. Matthew Stith
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 198

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Reconstruct the events surrounding the rise of Hazael to the throne of Aram-Damascus, and Jehu to the throne of Israel in the mid-eighth century BC. These near-simultaneous dynastic changes did not take place in a vacuum, but were parts of a major shift in the political, military, and economic structure of the Levant during Assyrian Hegemony in the region. D. Matthew Stith argues that Jehu’s bloody overthrow of Joram, the last Omride king of Israel, and Hazael’s irregular seizure of power after the death of his predecessor were related.

Stith’s narrative is shaped by careful engagement with modern historiography and with all the available historical evidence for this period: biblical texts, Assyrian annals and other ancient near eastern inscriptions, archaeological results, and even the geography and topography of the places in which the events took place.

D. Matthew Stith is the Pastor of Community Presbyterian Church in West Fargo, North Dakota. He holds the Ph.D. in Old Testament Studies from Princeton Theological Seminary.

The Dialogues of Jeremiah: Toward a Phenomenology of Exile

  • Author: Mitchel Modine
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 317

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Mitchel Modine argues that Jeremiah represents a range of options for understanding and responding to the events leading up to and following the destruction of Jerusalem and the temple in 586 BC. Modine seeks to uncover the rudiments of an important debate going on about the reasons for, the character of, and the prospects for new life after the exile.

Modine argues that, though what remains in Jeremiah is likely not the actual words of anyone, a way through the messy results of redaction after redaction can be had by considering what perceptions the book assigned to whom.

Mitchel Modine is professor of Old Testament as Asia-Pacific Nazarene Theological Seminary.

Three Mirrors for Two Biblical Ladies: The Queen of Sheba and Susanna in the Eyes of Jews, Christian, and Muslims

  • Author: Fabrizio Angelo Pennacchietti
  • Series: Biblical Intersections
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 152

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The biblical episode relating the encounter of the queen of Sheba with Solomon and the apocryphal tale of Susanna have always inspired narrative and figurative art, becoming part of the collective imagination in both the West and East. The figures of these two Old Testament women have been adapted in time and space to meet the expectations and changing cultural horizons of the Jewish, Christian, or Muslim community to whom it is addressed. Like mirrors, various periods and modes of late-Ancient and medieval Judaism, Christianity and Islam have each, in their own way, reflected the characteristics of the great Queen and of the chaste Susanna.

Fabrizio Angelo Penacchietti analyzes how the queen of Sheba has become part of a cycle of popular legends about the magical and miraculous powers attributed to Solomon. On the one hand, she has taken on the ambiguous features of a witch or a demon; on the other, she has been transformed into a sibyl who foretells the passion of Christ. Penacchietti observes that, in the case of Susanna, there lies half-hidden behind her story an ancient myth about the fall of the angels. In the Samaritan and Arab-Islamic version, as well as in Boccaccio’s reworking of the story, Susanna has been transformed into a disarmingly lovely, naive young girl, who has chosen to become an ascetic in the isolation of the desert.

An interesting collection of information about the varied legendary traditions that have grown up around the Queen of Sheba.

—Deborah W. Rooke, professor of theology and religious studies, King’s College, London

Fabrizio A. Pennacchietti holds the chair of semitic philology in the faculty of the humanities at the University of Turin.

The Seven Messages of Revelation and Vassal Treaties: Literary Genre, Structure, and Function

  • Author: David E. Graves
  • Series: Gorgias Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 477

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David E. Graves takes an interdisciplinary approach to Revelation, arguing that the genre of the seven messages in Revelation 2 and 3 are hybrid prophetic oracles, influenced by the Torah. To support this, Graves delivers a thorough and balanced treatment of the ancient Near Eastern vassal treaty structure and its influence on the messages to the seven churches of Asia Minor. Graves carefully traces the influence of the vassal treaty structure from the ancient Near East to the first century, leaving no stone unturned. This study also examines the function of the seven messages of Revelation within the context of the first-century church of Asia Minor.

Dr. Graves seeks to shed light on the problem of the structure of thought in Revelation by placing the work as a whole and the messages to the seven churches in particular firmly in the context of the ancient near eastern vassal treaties that have also influenced the shape of covenantal theology in the Old Testament. This carefully researched thesis brings a new contribution to the interpretation of the apocalypse and deserves close examination.

—I. Howard Marshall, emeritus professor of New Testament exegesis, University of Aberdeen

David E. Graves is an adjunct professor of religion at Liberty University, Lynchburg, Virginia.

Product Details

  • Title: Gorgias Biblical Studies Collection
  • Publisher: Gorgias Press
  • Volumes: 29
  • Pages: 8,720