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IVP Old Testament Studies Collection (16 vols.)
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Overview

Among modern Christians, the Old Testament is often neglected, or it is seen as secondary to the New Testament and the center of our faith, Jesus Christ. The IVP Old Testament Studies Collection shows us how all three persons of the triune God—the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit—are present throughout the Old Testament Scriptures, and it explains why an understanding of these Scriptures is essential to understanding the Christian faith. This collection unpacks over 4,000 pages of in-depth scrutiny of the Old Testament—prophecies, proverbs, psalms, and more.

Respected authors such as Christopher J. H. Wright and Tremper Longman show us how to read the Old Testament with in-depth writings, reflections, and questions for further study. Sandra L. Richter helps readers organize their approach to the Old Testament, while John Sailhamer offers a key for understanding the Pentateuch. And John H. Walton enters into the debate of origins through Genesis.

The 16 volumes in this collection offer scholarship and insight into the Old Testament that pastors, students, or indeed, any Christian, will find invaluable to their study of the Word.

With Logos Bible Software, these valuable volumes are enhanced by cutting-edge research tools. Scripture citations appear on mouseover in your preferred English translation. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful topical searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Tablet and mobile apps let you take the discussion with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • A thorough analysis of the Old Testament and its relation to the New Testament
  • Thoughts by some of today’s most respected Christian authors
  • A variety of approaches to examination of the Old Testament
  • Additional questions and recommended readings suitable for individual or group study

Product Details

  • Title: IVP Old Testament Studies Collection
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Volumes: 16
  • Pages: 4,188

Individual Titles

Genesis: The Story We Haven’t Heard

  • Author: Paul Borgman
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 252

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Unfortunately, most of us overlook the dramatic story of God’s work in early time because we read Scripture in disjointed pieces. We miss the suspenseful, sweeping narrative of interconnected events. We miss the nuances of emotion and relationship between the characters. Now in Genesis: The Story We Haven’t Heard, Paul Borgman fits the pieces back together—revealing God’s story as if it had never been read before.

Paul Borgman is an exciting and experienced teacher, and this book on Genesis—not your standard biblical commentary—comes from many years of dialogue in the classroom. It is a work that will prove interesting and useful both to laypersons and to college students. I highly recommend it.

—James S. Ackerman, coauthor, Teaching the Bible in English Classes

Borgman has read widely and is well rooted in the scholarly literature. His goal, however, is to make sense of the text by asking the kinds of questions that are raised by readers who have not been tamed away from the shock and puzzlement of the text. The book will interest those who have a literary sensitivity and face a literature that is theologically thick but unfamiliar. Borgman gives easy access but does not compromise the unfamiliarity and does not ‘explain’ the thickness in an easy way. Readers are invited to hear as for the first time.

Walter Brueggemann, author, Theology of the Old Testament.

This book I shared right away with my rabbi, my Jewish friends and colleagues. It is at once creative, enlightening and psychologically sophisticated. Borgman’s enjoyable commentary offers astonishingly compelling narrative truths to unlock the giant riddles of Genesis. No longer is God ‘inscrutable,’ being a ‘chosen people’ an entitlement of indelible righteousness, or God’s ‘plan’ mere arbitrary triumphal tribalism. And so, it illuminates an intrinsic coherence between contemporary Christian theology and the ethical relational striving informed by precursor truths known to the historical Jew Jesus.

—Steve Nisenbaum, department of psychiatry, Harvard Medical School

Paul Borgman is professor of English at Gordon College, in Wenham, Massachusetts. A specialist in biblical narrative, he is also the author of The Way according to Luke: Hearing the Whole Story of Luke-Acts.

How to Read Genesis

  • Author: Tremper Longman
  • Series: How to Read
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In How to Read Genesis Tremper Longman provides a welcome guide to reading and studying, as well as understanding and savoring this panorama of beginnings—both of the world and of Israel. And importantly for Christian readers, we gain insight into how Genesis points to Christ and can be read in light of the gospel.

Longman does a good job of addressing critical arguments about author and date in an accessible way . . .Longman deserves praise for giving laymen the tools to engage the Bible more thoughtfully.

Modern Reformation

[How to Read Genesis] is written in a way that allows any minister or teacher of the Word as well as any educated layperson to enter the world of contemporary Old Testament scholarship.

Daniel R. Hyde, Calvin Theological Journal

Longman sheds fresh light on overly familiar stories in an interesting and readable manner. He presents competing theological understandings of Genesis fairly (in my opinion). Most importantly, he leads the reader into actually reading Genesis, after reading about it.

—Dolores Klinsky Walker, National Church Library Association

Tremper Longman III is an Old Testament scholar and the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. Prior to joining Westmont in 1998, Longman taught for 18 years at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He received his MDiv from Westminster and a PhD from Yale University. In addition, he is one of the main translators of the popular New Living Translation, and has served as a consultant on other popular translations of the Bible, including The Message, the New Century Version, and the Holman Standard Bible.

How to Read Exodus

  • Author: Tremper Longman
  • Series: How to Read
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 187

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Exodus is a key to understanding the Bible. Without it, the Bible would lack three early scenes: deliverance, covenant, and worship. Exodus provides the events and narrative, along with the themes and imagery foundational for understanding the story of Israel and of Jesus.

You can read Exodus on your own, and its main themes will be clear enough. But an expert can sharpen your understanding and appreciation of its drama. Tremper Longman provides a guide to Exodus, discussing its historical backdrop, sketching out its literary context, and developing its principal themes, from Israel’s deliverance from Egypt to its dedication to serving God. Longman helps us view Exodus from the perspective of its fulfillment in Christ.

Scholarly approaches to narrative structure and archaeological, historical, and theological matters become practical through study questions that help readers appropriate Exodus in their daily lives.

Christian Century

Tremper Longman III is an Old Testament scholar and the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. Prior to joining Westmont in 1998, Longman taught for 18 years at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He received his MDiv from Westminster and a PhD from Yale University. In addition, he is one of the main translators of the popular New Living Translation, and has served as a consultant on other popular translations of the Bible, including The Message, the New Century Version, and the Holman Standard Bible.

How to Read the Psalms

  • Author: Tremper Longman
  • Series: How to Read
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 166

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Psalms possess an enduring fascination for us. For frankness, directness, intensity, and intimacy, they are unrivaled in all of Scripture. Somehow the psalmists seem to have anticipated all our awe, desires, and frustrations. No wonder Christians have used the Psalms in worship since the earliest times. Yet the Psalms cause us difficulties when we look at them closely. Their poetry is unfamiliar in form. Many images they use are foreign to us today. And the psalmists sometimes express thoughts that seem unworthy of Scripture.

Tremper Longman helps us overcome the distance between the psalmists’ world and ours. He explains the various kinds of psalms, the way they were used in Hebrew worship, and their relationship to the rest of the Old Testament. He looks at how Christians can appropriate their messages and insights today. He explains the use of parallelism and imagery.

Step-by-step suggestions for interpreting the psalms are followed by exercises for further study and reflection. Also included is a helpful guide to commentaries on the Psalms. How to Read the Psalms is a book for all those who long to better understand these mirrors of the soul.

Tremper Longman III is an Old Testament scholar and the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. Prior to joining Westmont in 1998, Longman taught for 18 years at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He received his MDiv from Westminster and a PhD from Yale University. In addition, he is one of the main translators of the popular New Living Translation, and has served as a consultant on other popular translations of the Bible, including The Message, the New Century Version, and the Holman Standard Bible.

How to Read Proverbs

  • Author: Tremper Longman
  • Series: How to Read
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 174

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In How to Read Proverbs Tremper Longman provides a welcome guide to reading and studying, as well as understanding and savoring the Proverbs for all their wisdom. While many proverbs speak to us directly, we can gain much greater insight by studying the book of Proverbs as a whole, understanding its relationship to ancient non-Israelite wisdom, and listening to its conversation with the other great voices of wisdom in Scripture—Job and Ecclesiastes.

This handy volume will solve the riddle of the book of Proverbs for many. Longman’s guidance for interpreting biblical proverbs in general is lucid and his clarification of special issues raised by Proverbs extremely helpful. A must-read for all who study and teach the book.

Daniel I. Block, associate dean, John R. Sampey Professor of Old Testament interpretation, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Tremper Longman III is an Old Testament scholar and the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. Prior to joining Westmont in 1998, Longman taught for 18 years at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia. He received his MDiv from Westminster and a PhD from Yale University. In addition, he is one of the main translators of the popular New Living Translation, and has served as a consultant on other popular translations of the Bible, including The Message, the New Century Version, and the Holman Standard Bible.

Knowing God the Father Through the Old Testament

  • Author: Christopher J. H. Wright
  • Series: Knowing God Through the Old Testament
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 234

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Knowing God the Father Through the Old Testament, Christopher J. H. Wright explores the images that pervade the biblical narratives, psalms, and prophetic texts of the Old Testament. God is acknowledged as tender yet terrifying, challenging to the nations yet intimately personal, offering loving care, provision, discipline, and forgiveness. This is the God Jesus knew—and whom we can know—as Father. Such knowledge of God is far from doctrinal; rather, it governs our worldview, personal and social ethics, and expectations of the future.

I had originally expected an academic treatment of God the Father in the Old Testament with many references to Hebrew grammar but this is not what I got. What I did get was a very easy to read, somewhat devotional treatment of God as Father in the Old Testament.

—Nick Norelli, Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth

Here is theology that feeds the soul in an immediate way, without getting sentimental. Pastors and church members will be rewarded in picking up this work and meditating on the various topics that fill out a Christian understanding of who God is as our Father.

—Mark D. Vander Hart, Mid-America Journal of Theology

An experience of biblical theology from which any believer can benefit.

—Dianne Bergant, The Bible Today

Wright capably demonstrates proper theological methodology while performing limited exegetical evaluation of the biblical text, demonstrating a biblical theological approach that can be grasped by the common reader.

—R. Alan Fuhr, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Christopher J. H. Wright (born 1947) is an Anglican clergyman and an Old Testament scholar. He is currently the director of Langham Partnership International. He was the principal of All Nations Christian College. He is an honorary member of the All Souls Church, Langham Place in London, UK. He has written many books, including The God I Don’t Understand: Reflections on Tough Questions of Faith.

Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament

  • Author: Christopher J. H. Wright
  • Series: Knowing God Through the Old Testament
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 256

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Christopher J. H. Wright is convinced that Jesus’ own story is rooted in the story of Israel. In Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament, Wright traces the life of Christ as it is illuminated by the Old Testament. He describes God’s design for Israel as it is fulfilled in the story of Jesus.

Christopher J. H. Wright (born 1947) is an Anglican clergyman and an Old Testament scholar. He is currently the director of Langham Partnership International. He was the principal of All Nations Christian College. He is an honorary member of the All Souls Church, Langham Place in London, UK. He has written many books, including The God I Don’t Understand: Reflections on Tough Questions of Faith.

Knowing the Holy Spirit through the Old Testament

  • Author: Christopher J. H. Wright
  • Series: Knowing God Through the Old Testament
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages:160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

We tend to think of the Holy Spirit as the straggler of the Trinity, a latecomer in God’s interaction with the world. But we first meet the Holy Spirit in the second verse of the Bible, hovering there, speaking the world into existence. Christopher J. H. Wright begins here and traces the Holy Spirit through the pages of the Old Testament. We see the third person of the Trinity in the decrees of prophets and psalmists, in the actions of judges and craftspeople, in the anointing of kings, and in the promise of a new creation. The witness of all Scripture, from its first pages to its last, directs us to a Holy Spirit empowering the people of God and sustaining and renewing the face of the earth.

This little volume does a great service in making the Third Person of the Trinity more known and glorious to our hearts and minds.

—Kent I. Compton, Haddington House Journal

Wright helps us reflect more deeply upon the work of the Holy Spirit from a biblical perspective and, thereby, encourages us to be more fully ‘people of the Spirit.’

Kevin L. Spawn, Pneuma

Christopher J. H. Wright (born 1947) is an Anglican clergyman and an Old Testament scholar. He is currently the director of Langham Partnership International. He was the principal of All Nations Christian College. He is an honorary member of the All Souls Church, Langham Place in London, UK. He has written many books, including The God I Don’t Understand: Reflections on Tough Questions of Faith.

The Old Testament Documents: Are They Reliable and Relevant?

  • Author: Walter C. Kaiser, Jr.
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 239

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this thought-provoking book Walter C. Kaiser Jr. makes the case that the Old Testament documents are both historically reliable and personally and socially relevant. He begins by looking at the origins of the Old Testament books and how well their texts were preserved. Next he explores Old Testament history, giving close attention to the book of Genesis, the patriarchal narratives, and the chronicles of the kings of Judah and Israel. He then surveys the larger questions of the trustworthiness and authority of the various Old Testament genres: historical narrative, wisdom, and prophecy. Lastly, Kaiser probes the relevance of the Old Testament for Christian faith today. And in an epilogue he asks—and answers—the question “What is the Old Testament all about?”

Walter C. Kaiser Jr. is an evangelical Old Testament scholar, writer, speaker, and educator. He earned degrees from Wheaton College and Brandeis University. Kaiser taught Bible and archaeology at Wheaton College and taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in several capacities. He currently serves as the Colman M. Mockler Distinguished Professor of Old Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and in 2006 retired as their President.

Kaiser has contributed to numerous publications, such as the Journal for the Study of Old Testament and Westminster Theological Journal. He has also written over 30 books, including Toward an Exegetical Theology and A History of Israel: From the Bronze Age through the Jewish Wars.

Old Testament Wisdom Literature: A Theological Introduction

  • Authors: Craig G. Bartholomew and Ryan P. O'Dowd
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The books of Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes are rooted in the order created by the one true God. Their steady gaze penetrates to the very nature of created reality and leads us toward peace and human flourishing. Craig G. Bartholomew and Ryan O'Dowd tune our ears to once again hear Lady Wisdom calling in the streets. Establishing the books in the context of ancient Near Eastern wisdom traditions and literature, the authors move beyond the scope of typical introductions to discuss the theological and hermeneutic implications of this literature.

Craig Bartholomew and Ryan O’Dowd have given the church a theology of Wisdom literature that is like apples of gold in settings of silver. Its apples of gold are its profound, penetrating and accurate insights into Old Testament wisdom. These are set in the silver settings of discerning evaluations, an engaging style, and the best of ancient and modern scholarship.

Bruce Waltke, Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies, Regent College and Distinguished Professor of Old Testament, Knox Theological Seminary

Clear, accessible and insightful. Bartholomew and O’Dowd have teamed up to produce an introduction to the theology of wisdom that will not only inform the readers’ minds but encourage their spiritual development as well. Great for classroom use.

Tremper Longman, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Within their discussion of aesthetics, Bartholomew and O’Dowd argue for the value and role of the arts. They demonstrate how wisdom unites heart and mind, as well as how poetry is a primary vehicle for conveying wisdom. Although written for pastors and seminary students, this book is accessible for anyone interested in Wisdom literature.

—Stephen M. Vantassel, BibleStudy Magazine

The book’s strengths, including its rigorous exegesis, faithfulness to the Biblical text, readability, recommended reading lists, thorough indexes, and accessibility and applicability to Christians across the spectrum—laity, pastors, and scholars—make this an essential volume for studying the Old Testament Wisdom Literature.

—Russell L. Meek, Southwestern Journal of Theology

Craig G. Bartholomew has a PhD from Bristol University and is the H. Evan Runner Professor of Philosophy and professor of religion and theology at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario. He is the author of Where Mortals Dwell: A Christian View of Place for Today, coauthor of Living at the Crossroads, and coeditor of a number of volumes, including the award-winning Dictionary for Theological Interpretation of the Bible. He is also a priest in the Church of England.

Ryan P. O'Dowd is senior visiting lecturer in aerospace studies at Cornell University. Previously he taught Old Testament at Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario, and was on the faculty of the Paideia Centre for Public Theology. He is author of The Wisdom of Torah and chair of the Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar, which is part of the Paideia Centre.

The Lost World of Genesis One: Ancient Cosmology and the Origins Debate

  • Author: John H. Walton
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this astute mix of cultural critique and biblical studies, John H. Walton presents and defends twenty propositions supporting a literary and theological understanding of Genesis 1 within the context of the ancient Near Eastern world and unpacks its implications for our modern scientific understanding of origins.

Ideal for students, professors, pastors, and lay readers with an interest in the intelligent design controversy and creation-evolution debates, Walton’s thoughtful analysis unpacks seldom appreciated aspects of the biblical text and sets Bible-believing scientists free to investigate the question of origins.

This book presents a profoundly important new analysis of the meaning of Genesis. Digging deeply into the original Hebrew language and the culture of the people of Israel in Old Testament times, respected scholar John Walton argues convincingly that Genesis was intended to describe the creation of the functions of the cosmos, not its material nature. In the process, he elevates Scripture to a new level of respectful understanding, and eliminates any conflict between scientific and scriptural descriptions of origins.

—Francis S. Collins, head of the Human Genome Project

Walton’s cosmic temple inauguration view of Genesis 1 is a landmark study in the interpretation of that controversial chapter. On the basis of ancient Near Eastern literatures, a rigorous study of the Hebrew word bara’ (‘create’), and a cogent and sustained argument, Walton has gifted the church with a fresh interpretation of Genesis 1. His view that the seven days refers to the inauguration of the cosmos as a functioning temple where God takes up his residence as his headquarters from which he runs the world merits reflection by all who love the God of Abraham.

Bruce Waltke, Professor Emeritus of Biblical Studies, Regent College and Distinguished Professor of Old Testament, Knox Theological Seminary

Every theologian, every pastor, every Christian in the natural sciences, indeed, every Christian who loves the Bible must put aside all other reading material this minute and immediately begin to absorb the contents of John Walton’s The Lost World of Genesis One. Walton closely examines Genesis 1 in light of ancient Near Eastern literature and offers a compelling case that the creation account is far more concerned with the cosmos being given its functions as God’s temple than it is with the manufacture of the material structures of the earth and universe. In the process, he has blown away all the futile attempts to elicit modern science from the first chapter of the Bible.

—Davis A. Young, Professor Emeritus of geology, Calvin College

John Walton offers a compelling and persuasive interpretation of Genesis, one that challenges those who take it as an account of material origins. His excellent book is must-reading for all who are interested in the origins debate.

Tremper Longman, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

John H. Walton is professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College. Previously he was professor of Old Testament at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois. He received his PhD from Hebrew Union College. Some of his books include Ancient Near Eastern Thought and the Old Testament and The Essential Bible Companion.

The Meaning of the Pentateuch: Revelation, Composition, and Interpretation

  • Author: John H. Sailhamer
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 632

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The Pentateuch is the foundation for understanding the Old Testament and the Bible as a whole. From a career of study, John H. Sailhamer sums up his perspective on the Pentateuch by first settling the hermeneutical question of where we should set our attention. Sailhamer is convinced that the text itself should be our primary focus. He searches out clues left by the author and the later editor of the Pentateuch that will disclose the meaning of this great work. By paying particular attention to the poetic seams in the text, he rediscovers a message that surprisingly brings us to the threshold of the New Testament gospel.

Sailhamer has made a valuable contribution to both Pentateuchal studies and the larger field of biblical theological studies.

—Roger D. Cotton, Enrichment

John H. Sailhamer has been teaching since 1975, most recently at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He was President of The Evangelical Theological Society in 2000 and has published a number of books, including An Introduction to Old Testament Theology, The Pentateuch as Narrative: A Biblical-Theological Commentary, and Genesis: The Expositor’s Bible Commentary. He has contributed a number of articles and book reviews in various biblical journals and has delivered several scholarly papers and participated in several Old Testament Bible translation committees.

Themes and Transformations in Old Testament Prophecy

  • Author: Samuel A. Meier
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 240

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Themes and Transformations in Old Testament Prophecy goes beyond standard introductions to the prophets. Yet it does so in a way that will inform and intrigue beginning students and anyone curious about the prophets of Israel. Sam Meier explores some recurring themes and features—such as angels, writing, miracles, the future, and king-making—and their transformation over time.

Excellent, readable study. Recommended.

Paul L. Redditt, Choice

Meier has provided a valuable contribution to the study of the prophets.

—Charles H. Savelle, Criswell Theological Review

Meier’s book betrays careful analysis and bravely tackles a difficult subject while offering much food for thought concerning the essential features of prophecy.

—David D. Pettus, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Samuel A. Meier is associate professor in the department of Near Eastern languages and cultures at Ohio State University. He is author of The Messenger in the Ancient Semitic World and Speaking of Speaking: Marking Direct Discourse in the Hebrew Bible.

Interpreting the Psalms: Issues and Approaches

  • Editors: Philip S. Johnston and David G. Firth
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 345

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The book of Psalms is of great interest to biblical scholars, and in recent years, studies have increasingly emphasized Hebrew poetry, the structure of the entire Psalter, and its development from earlier collections to a unified canonical book. Interpreting the Psalms: Issues and Approaches aims to bridge the gap between general introductions to the study of the Psalms and specialized literature. Written by members and guests of the Tyndale Fellowship Old Testament Study Group and edited by Philip S. Johnston and David Firth, Interpreting the Psalms offers the insights of internationally recognized Old Testament scholars into the world of the Psalms.

For those who treasure, love and pray the psalms, this book will be a sheer delight, and, if used in the classroom, it will offer up so much for lay people that they will . . .  say ‘Hallelujah!’

Reed Lessing, Concordia Journal

Philip S. Johnston is director of studies in theology and religious studies and senior tutor at Hughes Hall, Cambridge. He has taught at Belfast, St. Andrews, and Oxford. He has published studies of Israelite afterlife beliefs, and has an interest in Israel past and present—along with a commitment to reconciliation. He is the author of Shades Of Sheol.

David Firth is Old Testament Tutor at Cliff College, Derbyshire. His works include Surrendering Retribution in the Psalms: Responses to Violence in the Individual Complaints.

The Epic of Eden: A Christian Entry into the Old Testament

  • Author: Sandra L. Richter
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 263

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To many people, the Old Testament feels like a jumble of people, books, events, and ideas. Sandra Richter calls this the “dysfunctional closet syndrome,” and in The Epic of Eden she seeks to help readers put the Old Testament in usable order. From the Garden of Eden to the garden of the New Jerusalem, this book will organize your understanding of the Old Testament and renew your enthusiasm for studying the Bible as a whole.

The Old Testament tells of God’s creation and the redemption of his people. Granted, it is a story that climaxes in the New Testament, but the New Testament cannot be understood apart from the Old. Christians have neglected the study of the Old Testament because (if we are honest) we find it confusing and distant from Jesus Christ, the center of our faith. Sandra Richter’s The Epic of Eden helps the reader discover the riches and passion of the Old Testament story. This book will not only expand your knowledge, it will deepen your spiritual life.

Tremper Longman, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Using the image of a dysfunctional closet as her organizing metaphor, she provides a framework within which Old Testament data can be arranged and understood. Wherever possible she links the biblical material with the New Testament references. Extensive endnotes are evidence of the research that undergirds this book, but the writing style is reader-friendly and captures one’s imagination. Charts and illustrations throughout the book provide visual reinforcement of what is discussed. This is a very enjoyable introduction for beginners.

Diane Bergant, The Bible Today

Here is a text that will instruct its readers, no matter what level of expertise they bring to it. The author converses with her contemporary lay reader in a winsome manner, knowing well the cultural chasm that exists for many Western readers of the OT. At the same time, her years as both graduate student and professor are evident in her selection and presentation of key themes that introduce the OT. Both the text and the endnotes are goldmines of historical and theological observations and resources.

—Elaine A. Phillips, Bulletin for Biblical Research

Second only to my visiting Israel is The Epic of Eden in bringing the words of the Bible to life for me, at least as regards our watered-down understanding of the immensely important Biblical and historical concepts of covenant and redemption. . . .  For anyone who needs to clean their Old Testament closet, The Epic of Eden is a wonderful organizational tool.

—Peter M. Lopez, creator, beautyofthebible.com

Sandra L. Richter is professor of Old Testament, Wheaton College. She is a graduate of Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary and has a PhD from Harvard University’s Near Eastern languages and civilizations department. Her publications include Dictionary of the Old Testament: Historical Books, The Deuteronomistic History and the Name Theology, and articles in Eerdmans’ Handbook to the Bible.

The Story of Israel: A Biblical Theology

  • Authors: C. Marvin Pate, J. Scott Duvall, J. Daniel Hays, E. Randolph Richards, W. Dennis Tucker Jr., and Preben Vang
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 320

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The biblical story of Israel, in its election, sin, exile, and restoration, is a finely articulated drama—the universal story of the glory and the plight of humanity and creation. And the story of Jesus, who was born from the womb of Israel as its Messiah and as the true seed of Abraham, provides the redemptive solution to the plight of both Israel and the world.

This book by C. Marvin Pate, J. Scott Duvall, J. Daniel Hays, Randolph E. Richards, W. Dennis Tucker Jr., and Preben Vang explores the unitive theme of the story of Israel from Genesis to Revelation. Probing each section of Scripture—from the Pentateuch, Psalms, and Prophets to the Gospels, Epistles, and Apocalypse—the authors bring the contours of this story to light. From close-up examinations of key texts to panoramic shots of the biblical terrain, The Story of Israel unfolds an intriguing and compelling perspective on biblical theology. And with its features of recommended readings and study questions, it is a textbook suitable for use in the classroom and individual study.

The Story of Israel is an important volume on a crucial subject. While respecting the proper diversity of the different parts of the canon, the authors rightly recognize its essential coherence. The story of Israel is the story of a pattern of sin-exile-restoration. Written in a clear and engaging style, this book is a must-read for everyone interested in the message of the Bible. I particularly recommend it as a textbook for college or seminary classes.

Tremper Longman, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

C. Marvin Pate teaches at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. He was previously professor of Bible at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago, Illinois. He is the author of several books, including The End of the Age Has Come: The Theology of Paul and The Glory of Adam and the Afflictions of the Righteous: Pauline Suffering in Context.

J. Scott Duvall is professor of New Testament at Ouachita Baptist University. He received his PhD at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the coauthor of Biblical Greek Exegesis: A Graded Approach to Learning Intermediate and Advanced Greek and Preaching God’s Word.

J. Daniel Hays is dean of the Pruet School of Christian Studies and professor of Old Testament at Ouachita Baptist University. He is the author of From Every People and Nation, and he has coauthored several books, including Grasping God’s Word. He teaches adult Sunday school at his local church in Arkadelphia, Arkansas, and preaches frequently throughout the nation.

E. Randolph Richards is dean of the School of Ministry and professor of biblical studies at Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, Florida. He has frequently served as an interim or “supply” pastor, and from 1988 to 1996 he was a missionary with the International Mission Board, SBC, stationed in East Indonesia. He has an MDiv and PhD from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, and is the author of several works, including Paul and First-Century Letter Writing: Secretaries, Composition and Collection.

W. Dennis Tucker Jr. is associate dean and associate professor of Christian Scriptures for George W. Truett Theological Seminary, Baylor University, Waco, Texas. He has a PhD from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and is the author of Jonah: A Handbook on the Hebrew Text.

Preben Vang is professor of biblical and theological studies at Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, Florida. He is also pastor of Grace Pointe Church in Lake Worth, Florida. He is the coauthor of Telling God’s Story: The Biblical Narrative from Beginning to End.