Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PDT
Local: 4:09 PM

Sign in

  1. Forgot your password?
Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
Two ways to pay
$48.75/mo or $524.95
Pillar New Testament Commentary (PNTC) (15 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.

Overview

Designed both for serious students and for general readers of the Bible, the PNTC volumes seek above all to make clear the meaning of the text of Scripture as we have it. The scholars writing these volumes interact with the most important, informed contemporary debate yet avoid undue technical detail. The result is a blend of rigorous exegesis and exposition, scholarship and pastoral sensitivity, with an eye alert both to biblical theology and to the contemporary relevance of the Bible.

While the New International Version is the translation of choice for the English text, Pillar authors base their exposition on the Greek New Testament. They are deeply committed to a fresh wrestling with the text, using every means at their disposal to “loosen the Bible from its pages” to help readers understand what the text says and how to apply it to life today.

Underlying the approach of this series is the fact that God stands over against us rather than we in judgment of him. When God speaks to us in his Word, those who profess to know him must respond with reverence, a certain fear, a holy joy, and a questing obedience. These attitudes are reflected in the profoundly Christian stance of the PNTC authors toward the text. With these values in place, the Pillar commentaries will continue to be warmly welcomed by pastors, teachers, and students everywhere.

Logos Bible Software Edition

The Logos edition of the Pillar New Testament Commentary can be linked with any Bible in your personal library to scroll together, side-by-side on the screen. As you scroll through the biblical text, or jump to a new reference, PNTC keeps pace so you never have to hunt for your place! It also works the other way: scrolling through the commentary keeps the Bible synchronized.

Biblical references in the Pillar text are tagged as hotspots: a single click opens your preferred Bible version to the verse cited. You can KeyLink on a Greek or Hebrew lemma cited as an example to go straight to that word’s entry in any lexicon you own.

Perhaps best of all, Passage Guide will automatically search PNTC alongside your other commentaries every time you initiate a passage search from the software’s homepage. This makes it easier than you can imagine to glean valuable insight from a timeless commentary.

Individual Titles

The Gospel according to Matthew

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1992
  • Pages: 798

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In the Christian church the Gospel of Matthew has been considered the most important portrait of Jesus’ life and message. Containing Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount and a uniquely rich collection of parables, among many other things, Matthew has made a major contribution to the church throughout the centuries, and it still has much to say to the church today.

This superb commentary in the Pillar series explores the meaning and relevance of Matthew in an eminently straightforward fashion. Leon Morris writes for readers who use commentaries to discover further what the Bible means. Throughout, he makes clear what he considers to be the meaning of the Greek text that Matthew has bequeathed to the church. A perceptive introduction precedes Morris’s warmhearted verse-by-verse exposition of Matthew, an exposition based on his own literal translation of the text. Now a standard reference work on the Gospel of Matthew, this mature, evangelically oriented commentary will continue to meet the needs of students, pastor, and general readers alike.

Leon Morris retired as principal of Ridley College in Melbourne, Australia, in 1979. He is the author of more than 40 books, including The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross, the volumes on Matthew and Romans in The Pillar New Testament Commentary, and the volumes on John and the Thessalonian epistles in the New International Commentary on the New Testament.

The Gospel according to Mark

  • Author: James R. Edwards
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 578

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume offers exceptional commentary on Mark that clearly shows the second Gospel—though it was a product of the earliest Christian community—to be both relevant and sorely needed in today’s church.

Written by a biblical scholar who has devoted 30 years to the study of the second Gospel, this commentary aims primarily to interpret the Gosepl of Mark according to its theological intentions and purposes, especially as they relate to the life and ministry of Jesus and the call to faith and discipleship. Unique features of James Edwards’s approach include clear descriptions of key terms used by Mark and revealing discussion of the Gospel’s literary features, including Mark’s use of the “sandwich” technique and of imagistic motifs and irony. Edwards also proposes a new paradigm for interpreting the difficult “Little Apocalypse” of chapter 13, and he argues for a new understanding of Mark’s controversial ending.

Based on the New International Version of the Bible and often making reference to the nuance of the Greek original, the commentary provides the reader with a clear, well-informed, and thoughtful interpretation of Mark’s Gospel.

—Southwestern Journal of Theology

James Edwards’s new, careful study of the earliest Gospel brings together his interest in and ongoing research regarding Mark’s work. He does so in a way that will have a broad appeal to a wide audience, including both the academic community and the service of pastors and teachers. This is an excellent piece of applied research and rigorous study.

Ralph P. Martin, professor emeritus of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary

James R. Edwards is professor of religion at Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington. He has written numerous articles in scholarly and popular journals and is a contributing editor of Christianity Today. His other books include The Layman’s Overview of the Bible, The Divine Intruder: When God Breaks into Your Life, and the volume on Romans in the New International Biblical Commentary series.

The Gospel according to John

  • Author: D. A. Carson
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1990
  • Pages: 715

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4

In this solid evangelical commentary on John’s Gospel, a respected Scripture expositor makes clear the flow of the text, engages a small but representative part of the massive secondary literature on John, shows how the fourth Gospel contributes to biblical and systematic theology, and offers a consistent exposition of John as an evangelistic Gospel. The comprehensive introduction treats such matters as the authenticity, authorship, purpose, and structure of the Gospel.

Christianity Today - Number 1 Critic’s Choice for Commentaries & Runner-up Reader’s Choice (1992)

D. A. Carson is research professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois. He is the author or editor of more than 40 books, including Sermon on the Mount, Exegetical Fallacies, Matthew (Expositor’s Bible Commentary), Showing the Spirit, The Gagging of God, and (with John Woodbridge) Hermeneutics, Authority and Canon and Letters Along the Way.

The Epistle to the Romans

  • Author: Leon Morris
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 590

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Morris tackles the complexities of faith and interpretation associated with the Epistle to the Romans in this substantial yet easy-to-read commentary, written to be intelligible to the layperson while also taking account of modern scholarship.

Evangelical Christian Publishers Association - Gold Medallion award for Commentaries (1989)

Leon Morris as principal of Ridley College in Melbourne, Australia, in 1979. He is the author of more than 40 books, including The Apostolic Preaching of the Cross, the volumes on Matthew and Romans in The Pillar New Testament Commentary, and the volumes on John and the Thessalonian epistles in the New International Commentary on the New Testament.

Paul’s Letter to the Romans

  • Author: Colin G. Kruse
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 669

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Colin Kruse’s commentary on the book of Romans shows how Paul expounds the gospel against the background of God’s sovereign action as creator, judge, and redeemer of the world. In the process, Kruse elucidates Paul’s teaching about matters of concern in the Roman house churches—issues that remain important today. Kruse’s gift for clarity and economy in dealing with such complex and important matters promises to make this commentary an enduring standard for years to come.

The Pillar New Testament Commentary series is quickly establishing itself as the premier mid-level commentary series on the English text of Scripture but written with full awareness of the Greek and all the key exegetical debates that busy pastors and teachers need to know about.

Craig Blomberg, Denver Seminary

Colin G. Kruse is lecturer in New Testament at the Bible College of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, where he also coordinates postgraduate research studies. He has written several books, including Paul, the Law, and Justification and New Testament Models for Ministry.

The Letter to the Ephesians

  • Author: Peter T. O’Brien
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 569

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

From a foremost authority on the New Testament comes a major new commentary on Ephesians—a letter of truth, love, and unity to our superficial world.

This volume provides a rich exposition of Ephesians, one of the most significant documents ever written. Using the fruits of recent biblical research, Peter O’Brien shows how Ephesians sums up God’s magnificent plan of salvation in Christ and spells out his divine purpose for believers today.

A model of the scholarly excellence characteristic of the entire PNTC series, O’Brien’s Ephesians will become the standard work on this profoundly influential book.

This commentary is definitely a masterpiece, a volume that without question should belong to the library of all who desire to achieve a profound and comprehensive understanding of the epistle. Its simple, yet highly scholarly style will not only inform, but also challenge the reader to prepare for intense study and arrive at certain positions only after weighing carefully all the evidence.

—Faith & Mission

O’Brien has produced a well-researched and clearly presented commentary on Ephesians. He has read widely and thought carefully, so students of the New Testament will find his scholarly contribution a useful addition to their libraries.

—Theological Book Review

Here is a commentary that expounds this marvelous epistle with a clarity and reverence that are quite refreshing. O’Brien draws upon his years of experience as a missionary, pastor, professor, and scholar to write a book that examines all the inspired nuances of Ephesians without losing sight of the main theme all the way….Practical, scholarly exposition that takes a high view of Scripture.

—Wisconsin Lutheran Quarterly

Peter T. O’Brien is vice principal and senior research fellow in New Testament, Moore Theological College, Sydney, Australia.

The Letters to the Thessalonians

  • Author: Gene L. Green
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 440

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary, Gene Green reads Paul’s two letters to the Thessalonians in light of the canon of Scripture and of new knowledge about the first-century world of Thessalonica. This fruitful approach helps illuminate the impact of the gospel on its original readers and, in turn, shows how potent a force it can be for the church and society today.

The book begins with an in-depth study of the Thessalonians themselves—their history, land, socioeconomic conditions, and religious environment. This fascinating discussion gives the necessary context for fully appreciating the circumstances surrounding the founding of the city’s first church and the subsequent struggles of the Thessalonian believers to live out their Christian faith.

The main body of the book provides informed verse-by-verse commentary on 1 & 2 Thessalonians that extracts the fullest possible meaning from these important New Testament texts. As Green’s exposition shows, the Thessalonian scriptures are especially valuable as letters of friendship and for showing Paul’s pastoral concern for the many areas in which the Thessalonians needed guidance. Some of Paul’s purposes are to thank the new believers for their steadfastness amid suffering, to encourage them in their trials, to urge them not to neglect their daily work, and, no less important, to teach them about the future of believers who die before Christ returns. Indeed, the matter of the last things and the second coming of Christ so permeates these texts that they are often called Paul’s eschatological letters.

Filled with new information about ancient society, this commentary will fast become a standard reference work for Bible study. By carefully bridging the biblical and modern worlds, Green shows with clarity and warmth the continuing relevance of 1 & 2 Thessalonians for contemporary readers.

Gene L. Green is professor of New Testament at Wheaton College in Illinois. He previously served as a missionary in Costa Rica, where he was professor of New Testament at Seminario ESEPA, and he is also the author of Spanish-language commentaries on 1 & 2 Thessalonians and 1 & 2 Peter.

The Letter of James

  • Author: Douglas J. Moo
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 287

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Few books in the New Testament are better known or more often quoted as the Letter of James. Because James is so concise, so intensely practical, and so filled with memorable metaphors and illustrations, it has become one of the two or three most popular New Testament books in the church.

This highly original commentary seeks to make the Letter of James clear and applicable to Christian living today. Interacting with the latest views on James but keeping academic references to a minimum, Douglas Moo first introduces the Letter of James in its historical context and then provides verse-by-verse comments that explain the message of James both to its first readers and to today’s church.

The commentary is most valuable for its excellent exegesis, which is not so technical that the non-scholar would find it tedious. Homiletical and devotional insights, which pervade the work, also make the volume a worthwhile addition to the Bible student’s library.

—Interpretation

There is much to be gained from this commentary, both exegetical and practical, by pastors and serious students.

—Southwestern Journal of Theology

Moo has many insights into the challenges James presents to the Church of his time and of today. James’s contention, that Christians must not only reflect theologically about life but also live a holy and obedient lifestyle, is a timely word which ought to be heard and heeded, especially in the western Church of this new millennium….This re-evaluation of James is much to be commended.

—Methodist Recorder (UK)

Douglas J. Moo is the Blanchard Professor of New Testament at Wheaton Graduate School in Wheaton, Illinois. Formerly, he taught for over 20 years at Trinity Evangelical School in Deerfield, Illinois.

The Letters of John

  • Author: Colin G. Kruse
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 277

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This Pillar commentary seeks to clearly explain the meaning of John’s letters to teachers, pastors, and general readers looking for a reliable resource for personal study. Colin Kruse introduces the important issues involved in interpreting the Johannine letters, gives verse-by-verse comments, and provides extensive discussion of John’s major theological themes, including the real humanity of Christ, atonement, the role of the Spirit, Christian assurance, the meaning of koinonia, Christian love, and eternal life.

Designed both for serious students and for general readers of the Bible, the Pillar New Testament Commentary volumes seek to make clear the meaning of the text of Scripture as we have it. The scholars writing these volumes interact with the most important, informed contemporary debate yet avoid undue technical detail. Their ideal is a blend of rigorous exegesis and exposition, scholarship and pastoral sensitivity, with an eye alert both to biblical theology and to the contemporary relevance of the Bible.

The exegesis is thorough and convincing. This commentary will serve the parish preacher. It will enlighten epistles that the church does not often ponder enough.

—The Clergy Journal

Kruse, an Australian biblical scholar, is obviously in command of the current literature on the letters of John and writes with a lucid and well balanced perspective on the origin and context of the letters. His commentary is enriched with frequent extended notes that delve into some of the key concepts or more debated aspects of the letters.

—The Bible Today

Those specializing in Johannine studies, as well as pastors and students, will welcome this latest contribution to our (better) understanding of the letters of John.

—Southwestern Journal of Theology

Colin G. Kruse is lecturer in New Testament at the Bible College of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia, where he also coordinates postgraduate research studies. He has written several books, including Paul, the Law, and Justification and New Testament Models for Ministry.

The Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon

  • Author: Douglas J. Moo
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 480

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Exhibiting the same brilliant exegesis and sound practical insight found in his previous works, noted commentator Douglas J. Moo, in this new volume, not only explains accurately the meaning of the letters to the Colossians and to Philemon but also applies that meaning powerfully to twenty-first century readers. Moo attentively interacts with the Greek text of these letters and clearly explains the English text to a contemporary audience.

Informed, evangelical, methodologically astute, and displaying a careful balance between good scholarship and pastoral concern—earmarks of the Pillar New Testament Commentary—Moo’s Letters to the Colossians and to Philemon will offer insights to a wide range of readers, from teachers and students, to pastors and parishioners, to scholars and laypersons.

Moo has done it again! Just as his Pillar volume on James and his NICNT volume on Romans both rank, in my estimation, as the best available intermediate-level commentaries on those books, now he has produced a comparable volume on Colossians and Philemon. Clear, judicious, abreast of all the relevant scholarship, yet not unnecessarily long, this book should be the first choice of most pastors and teachers for help with exegeting these delightful little Pauline letters.

Craig Blomberg, Denver Seminary

This fine Pillar commentary by Doug Moo not only matches his volume on James but also is in keeping with his masterly exposition of Romans in the New International Commentary Series. His present work is characterized by insightful, sensitive exegesis and thoughtful interaction with the vast array of recent literature on Colossians and Philemon. A surefooted guide, Moo leads the reader to understand the meaning of the biblical text, to grasp its theological significance and thus to hear afresh the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ that is ‘bearing fruit and growing throughout the whole world.’ Moo’s commentary is a must for every serious student of these two brief yet profound Pauline letters.

Peter T. O’Brien, Moore Theological College

Outstanding. . . . Doug Moo combines his exegetical skill and extensive knowledge of the nuances of Pauline theology into a compelling explanation of the meaning of Colossians and Philemon. Readers will appreciate Moo’s wise judgment as he navigates through a variety of interpretational issues. Very well written and richly informative, this commentary should be the textbook of choice for courses on these two letters.

Clinton E. Arnold, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University

Douglas J. Moo is Blanchard Professor of New Testament at Wheaton Graduate School. His previous commentaries include the NICNT volume on Romans and Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter of James.

The Letter to the Hebrews

  • Author: Peter T. O’Brien
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 600

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

In this carefully crafted commentary, Peter T. O’Brien distinctively harvests the results of recent scholarship on the letter to the Hebrews, especially in relation to the genre of the document and the flow of its discourse. O’Brien views this letter as a “word of exhortation”—a homily or sermon that skillfully interweaves exposition and exhortation, encouraging faithful perseverance in the light of the superlative final word that God has spoken in Christ.

Reflecting the aims of the Pillar New Testament Commentary series as a whole, O’Brien’s volume on Hebrews is neither unduly technical nor unhelpfully brief—purposely a middle-range commentary. Its careful exegesis and exposition and its theological richness and warm devotion will fruitfully serve pastors, teachers, and students everywhere.

It would be difficult to find a more helpful guide than Peter O’Brien or a guide better endowed with his combination of competence and genial wisdom.

D. A. Carson, research professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois

Peter O’Brien is senior research fellow in New Testament, Moore Theological College, Sydney, Australia. He is also the author of the Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Letter to the Ephesians.

The Letter to the Philippians

  • Author: G. Walter Hansen
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 392

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary G. Walter Hansen offers rich exposition of the text of Philippians as well as wisdom and maturity in its application. In so doing he emphasizes partnership—the social and corporate dimensions of community—in the progress of the gospel.

After a select bibliography, Hansen’s introduction sets forth the historical setting of the church in Philippi, the nature and occasion of the letter, and a preview of two key themes—the gospel of Christ and the community in Christ. The commentary itself discusses Philippians in light of these themes, considering Paul’s greetings, reports of gospel ministry, imperatives for citizens worthy of the gospel, recommendations of two Christ-like servants, and disclosures of his personal experience. Hansen’s treatment as a whole is distinctive for the way it draws out and highlights the themes of partnership, citizenship, and friendship in Paul’s Philippian letter.

With themes and emotions so varied, the letter to the Philippians needs a commentator with a sure grasp and a warm heart. . . . Hansen writes with admirable clarity and simplicity, even when he is unpacking notoriously complex matters.

D. A. Carson, research professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois

Walter Hansen, representing that rare combination of a first-rate scholar and a pastor with years of experience in the church, writes the kind of commentary one might expect—devoted to solid, informed exegesis with an emphasis on the present application of the text. Its exceptional clarify, depth, and theological richness make this an outstanding commentary that will be of real help to every student of Philippians.

Donald A. Hagner, Fuller Theological Seminary

Here is a significant commentary on Paul’s letter to the Philippians that is suitable not only for scholars but also for ministers, laypeople, and students. It is theologically sound, critically balanced, exegetically perceptive, pastorally relevant, and ethically focused. It needs to be read, closely studied, and—more importantly—allowed by God’s Spirit to reorganize our thinking and restructure our living. . . . Erudite, challenging, and a good read.

Richard Longenecker, Wycliffe College, Toronto

G. Walter Hansen is the seminary professor for global theological education at Fuller Theological Seminary.

The Acts of the Apostles

  • Author: David G. Peterson
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 848

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

15 years in the making, this comprehensive commentary by David Peterson offers thorough exegesis and exposition of the Acts of the Apostles, drawing on recent scholarship in the fields of narrative criticism and theological analysis. It incorporates insights into historical-social background, and investigates why Luke presents his material in the way he does.

In view of how long the book of Acts is—over a thousand verses—Peterson’s commentary is admirably economical yet meaty. His judgments, according to Don Carson, are always “sane, evenhanded, and judicious.” Even while unpacking exegetical details, Peterson constantly scans the horizon, keeping the larger picture in mind. With its solid exegesis, astute theological analysis, and practical contemporary application, Peterson’s Acts of the Apostles is a commentary that preachers, teachers, and students everywhere will want and need.

Here in one convenient volume is the basic introductory information and verse-by-verse exegesis that New Testament students and preachers need in order to understand the second part of Luke’s account of Christian beginnings. This commentary is noteworthy for its incorporation of a full essay on the theology of Acts and its careful attention to theological issues in the course of the exposition, at the same time it does not neglect historical and literary matters. I warmly commend this useful tool for study.

I. Howard Marshall, University of Aberdeen

David Peterson interacts with Acts scholarship fairly and in an up-to-date way. His literary and historical conclusions are well informed and sound. His introduction airs issues thoroughly, yet the entire work is easy to follow. Peterson consistently engages the cohesive larger picture and the theological message of the book.

Craig S. Keener, Palmer Theological Seminary

One of the most complex books of the Bible, the Acts of the Apostles, presents readers with formidable historical, literary, and theological challenges. In recent decades scores of researchers have deepened our understanding of the book in each of these areas. David Peterson’s excellent exposition of Acts interacts insightfully with those studies and offers a lucid, compelling, and satisfying interpretation of the book. Like its subject, this commentary is informative, edifying, and challenging. Pastors and teachers will find it to be an invaluable guide to reading Acts with profit.

Brian S. Rosner, Moore Theological College and Macquarie University

David G. Peterson is senior research fellow in New Testament at Moore Theological College, Sydney, Australia. His previous books include Engaging with God and (with I. Howard Marshall) Witness to the Gospel: The Theology of Acts.

The First Letter to the Corinthians

  • Author: Roy E. Ciampa, Brian S. Rosner
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 960

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This thorough commentary presents a coherent reading of 1 Corinthians, taking full account of its Old Testament and Jewish roots and demonstrating Paul’s primary concern for the unity and purity of the church and the glory of God. Roy Ciampa and Brian Rosner’s well-informed, careful exegesis touches on an astonishingly wide swath of important yet sensitive issues, reinforcing the letter’s ongoing theological and pastoral significance.

The Pillar New Testament Commentary series is quickly establishing itself as the premier mid-level commentary series on the English text of Scripture but written with full awareness of the Greek and all the key exegetical debates that busy pastors and teachers need to know about. Volumes such as James Edwards on Mark, D. A. Carson on John, David Peterson on Acts, Peter O’Brien on Ephesians, Douglas Moo on Colossians and Philemon and also on James, Gene Green on Thessalonians, Peter Davids on 2 Peter and Jude and Colin Kruse on the Letters of John are as fine as any “competitors” of the same scope in print. And more of the same quality are continuing to appear.

Craig Blomberg, Denver Seminary

Up to date, replete with many fresh readings, and rooted in the complex historical context that was first century Corinth, this commentary is in touch with those issues that make 1 Corinthians so relevant for the church. Both useful and edifying, Ciampa and Rosner’s work is a partner to keep close at hand as one probes this ethically relevant epistle.

Darrell L. Bock, Dallas Theological Seminary

Two experts on 1 Corinthians provide detailed yet lucid exegesis of one of Paul’s more difficult letters. I particularly appreciate the very full introduction, which covers many more topics than the usual introductions to a Pauline letter.

Richard Bauckham, University of St. Andrews

Here 1 Corinthians emerges as a unified and comprehensive exercise in radical theological and ethical reorientation, whereas past interpretations all too often defined its purposes merely in terms of addressing a list of various concerns. This clarification of Paul’s agenda creates a compelling context for thinking about the shape of Christian faith today.

Philip H. Towner, Nida Institute for Biblical Scholarship

For the past generation research into and commentaries on 1 Corinthians have focused on clarifying the social and literary contexts of the letter. Now Rosner and Ciampa remind us that the primary background for Paul’s theology and ethics was his biblical and Jewish heritage. And in demonstrating how much fresh light can be shed on the letter by taking account of that heritage, they also show that 1 Corinthians still has much to contribute to the discussion of present-day issues.

James D. G. Dunn, University of Durham

Written in an impressively clear manner and assuming a varied audience of students, pastors, and scholars, this new commentary represents a major contribution to recent discussion of this much-controverted Pauline letter.

—James Carleton Paget, Cambridge University

Roy E. Ciampa is director of the ThM program in biblical studies, associate professor of New Testament, and chair of the division of biblical studies at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in South Hamilton, Massachusetts.

Brian S. Rosner is senior lecturer in New Testament and ethics at Moore Theological College and Honorary Senior Research Fellow in ancient history at Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. He is the author and editor of a number of books, including Understanding Paul’s Ethics and New Dictionary of Biblical Theology.

The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude

  • Author: Peter H. Davids
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 348

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Filling a notable gap in scholarship on 2 Peter and Jude, Peter Davids artfully unpacks these two neglected but fascinating epistles that deal with the confrontation between the Greco-Roman world and the burgeoning first-century Jesus communities. Davids firmly grasps the overall structure of these oft-maligned epistles and presents a strong case for 2 Peter and Jude as coherent, consistent documents. Marked by exceptional exegesis and sharp, independent judgments, Davids’ work both connects with the latest scholarship and transforms scholarly insights into helpful conclusions benefiting Christian believers.

In this well-written and informative commentary on 2 Peter and Jude, Peter Davids helps us read these two fascinating letters in light of their Jewish background. He uses his exegetical skill and knowledge of Judaism to provide satisfying explanations of ‘slandering celestial beings’ and the many other difficult-to-understand passages. This outstanding commentary is clearly a ‘top pick’ on these two letters.

Clinton E. Arnold, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University

A reliable and literate work—knowledgeable without being cluttered, informed without being pedantic. As a traditional commentary, it argues introductory matters well, relies on epistolary and rhetorical insights for structural guides, and is very well informed on Israelite and Greco-Roman background.... Balances the big canvas with smaller cameo scenes.... Should be considered the best of a new wave of commentaries on Jude and 2 Peter.

Jerome Neyrey, University of Notre Dame

This is an exemplary commentary, marked by the author’s mature scholarship, keen theological insights, and deep pastoral concerns. His thorough exegesis, conducted with a singular combination of rhetorical and narrative analysis as well as other usual critical methods, has produced a most reliable exposition of these neglected epistles.

—Seyoon Kim, Fuller Theological Seminary

A careful and painstaking treatment of the least well known of the General Epistles… The reader’s curiosity is both stimulated and satisfied by this commentary. It will fill a niche in today’s market and be a welcome addition to the libraries of both scholars and pastors. I commend it with enthusiasm.

Ralph P. Martin, Fuller Theological Seminary

Peter H. Davids is professor of biblical theology at St. Stephen’s University, St. Stephen, New Brunswick. He is also the coeditor of Dictionary of the Later New Testament and Its Developments.

Product Details

  • Title: Pillar New Testament Commentary
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Volumes: 15
  • Pages: 8,551