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New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC) (19 vols.)
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Overview

The New Beacon Bible Commentary is an engaging, indispensable reference tool that equips you to study and meditate on God’s Word. Written from the Wesleyan theological perspective, it offers insightful scholarship to help you unlock Scripture’s deeper truths and garner an awareness of the history, culture, and context attributed to each book studied. Readable, relevant, and academically thorough, it offers a new standard for understanding and interpreting the Bible in the twenty-first century.

In the Logos edition, these valuable volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Discover more incredible titles from Beacon Hill with the New Beacon Bible Commentary Upgrade 3 Collection (3 vols.). This collection features exciting works that cover Hebrews, Leviticus, and Luke 9–24!

Key Features

  • The latest scholarship from notable experts in the Wesleyan tradition
  • Convenient introductory material for each book of the Bible, including information on authorship, dating, history, audience, sociological/cultural issues, purpose, literary features, theological themes, hermeneutical issues, and more
  • Clear verse-by-verse explanations that offer a contemporary, Wesleyan-based understanding derived from the passage’s original language
  • Comprehensive annotation divided into three sections:
    • Background elements behind the text
    • Verse-by-verse details and meanings
    • Significance, relevance, intertextuality, and application
  • Insight into theological issues, word meanings, archaeological connections, historical relevance, cultural customs, and more
  • Expanded bibliography for further study of historical elements, additional interpretations, and theological themes

Individual Titles

Genesis 1–11

  • Author: Joseph Coleson
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Genesis 1–11 is clear and accessible without sacrificing serious scholarship. In the Logos edition, each Scripture passage links to your favorite translation, and is easy to study side by side with your other Genesis commentaries. You can search by topic or Scripture with remarkably fast results.

Joseph Coleson is professor of Old Testament at Nazarene Theological Seminary. He received his BA from Indiana Wesleyan University and his MA and PhD from Brandeis University. He has served as co-editor of Kardia, the journal of Western Evangelical Seminary, and is a member of the translation team of the New Living Translation and of the Eighth Oxford Institute of Methodist Theological Studies.

Judges

  • Author: Robert D. Branson
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 189

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Judges both fires the imagination and chills the soul. Great victories over the strong were won by the weak. Oppressed and enslaved, the tribes of Israel struggled against the opposing forces equipped with the most advanced technology. The four soldiers of Barak fought the battalions of chariots commanded by Sisera. The Philistines who knew the secret of smelting iron equipped their armies with modern weapons while the Israelites had few weapons to fight with. Yet the God of Israel fought for his people. Led by a charismatic leader chosen by God, the victorious armies wrested their freedom from the hands of their oppressors.

Robert D. Branson’s commentary moves verse-by-verse through the book of Judges and provides illuminating insight into a book that records not only the triumphs of war but also the depths of human depravity.

Robert Branson, former professor of biblical literature at Olivet Nazarene University, also taught at Warner Southern College and Eastern Nazarene College.

1 & 2 Samuel

  • Author: Kevin J. Mellish
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The books of Samuel constitute an important part of the larger literacy work that extends from Joshua through Kings, which modern scholars refer to as the Deuteronomistic History. These books provide a vital literary and historical link in the Bible’s overall presentation of Israel’s past.

Kevin Mellish has taught biblical literature at Olivet Nazarene University since 2004. He received his BA from Olivet Nazarene University, MDiv from Nazarene Theological Seminary, and MPhil and DPhil from Claremont Graduate University. Previously, he served in the Ontario-Montclair School District and as an associate pastor at Ontario First Church of the Nazarene.

Ecclesiastes and Lamentations

  • Author: Stephen J. Bennett
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ecclesiastes is one of the most interesting books in the Bible, in part because it is so different from the others, even from the other wisdom books (Job, Proverbs, Song of Songs). Like the wisdom books, Ecclesiastes largely ignores the history and law of ancient Israel, but it also challenges the accepted themes and theology of the wisdom tradition. This has led to puzzlement from general readers and a great diversity of interpretation from scholars. The purpose of this commentary by Stephen J. Bennet is to provide a viable and helpful interpretation of Ecclesiastes while also surveying some diverse interpretations previously made by noted scholars.

The book of Lamentations is a collection of five psalms that lament the fall of Jerusalem. They are largely an expression of grief and contain very little information about the historical events that caused the suffering. Instead they provide details of desolation and shame, expressions of emotion, accusations against God, and sometimes hints of repentance and glimmers of hope.

Stephen J. Bennett is the associate professor of Old Testament at Nyack College, New York. This ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene has a PhD from Manchester University.

Jeremiah 1–25

  • Author: Alex Varughese
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages:

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Jeremiah occupies a prominent place in the Old Testament canon at least on three counts: (1) its massive size (the second longest book in the Bible and the longest prophetic book); (2) the complexity of its content and message; and (3) the towering prophetic figure behind the book that stands shoulder to shoulder with other great prophets such as Isaiah and Ezekiel.

Alex Varughese’s verse-by-verse commentary observes the theological expressions of God’s sovereignty over Judah and the nations in the world found in Jeremiah 1–25.

Alex Varughese is professor of biblical literature at Mount Vernon Nazarene University and has been a member of the Department of Religion at MVNU since 1982. Previous to his current position, he served as a professor in the religion department at Eastern Nazarene College. He is an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene and holds BS and MS degrees from the University of Kerala, India. He received his MA in religion from Olivet Nazarene University and MDiv from Nazarene Theological Seminary. He also holds MPhil and PhD degrees in biblical studies from Drew University. He is currently serving as the Managing Editor for The Centennial Initiative Textbook project for the Church of the Nazarene.

Jeremiah 26–52

  • Author: Alex Varughese and Mitchel Modine
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 318

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Jeremiah occupies a prominent place in the Old Testament canon at least on three counts: (1) its massive size (the second longest book in the Bible and the longest prophetic book); (2) the complexity of its content and message; and (3) the towering prophetic figure behind the book that stands shoulder to shoulder with other great prophets such as Isaiah and Ezekiel.

Alex Varughese’s and Mitchel Modine’s verse-by-verse commentary observes the theological expressions of God’s sovereignty over Judah and the nations in the world found in Jeremiah 26–52.

Alex Varughese is professor of biblical literature at Mount Vernon Nazarene University and has been a member of the Department of Religion at MVNU since 1982. Previous to his current position, he served as a professor in the religion department at Eastern Nazarene College. He is an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene and holds BS and MS degrees from the University of Kerala, India. He received his MA in religion from Olivet Nazarene University and MDiv from Nazarene Theological Seminary. He also holds MPhil and PhD degrees in biblical studies from Drew University. He is currently serving as the Managing Editor for The Centennial Initiative Textbook project for the Church of the Nazarene.

Mitchel Modine is an assistant professor of Old Testament and the director of the Master of Science in Theology program at Asia-Pacific Nazarene Theological Seminary. He is the author of several scholarly papers, and is currently finalizing his dissertation, Everything Written in This Book: The Perceptions of the Exile in the Book of Jeremiah, for publication.

Ezekiel

  • Author: Brad E. Kelle
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ezekiel is clear and accessible without sacrificing serious scholarship. The aim of this volume is to offer a distinctive engagement with the theological dynamics of the book for readers from the Wesleyan theological tradition, with a special eye to Ezekiel’s use of Old Testament priestly theology to respond to the trauma associated with the Babylonian exile.

Brad E. Kelle is the assistant professor of biblical literature, Point Loma Nazarene University. An ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene, he holds degrees from Emory University, Chandler School of Theology, and Trevecca Nazarene University. He is also the author of numerous articles.

Daniel

  • Author: Jim Edlin
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Daniel speaks a fresh message to each new generation. For over two millennia it has done so. The book invites its readers to live within a larger story than their own. It gives them a glimpse of the broad sweep of human history and the cosmic proportions of God’s intentions. In light of certainties about the final outcome of this world, this book challenges believers to risk radical faith in God within the context of a hostile world.

This message has been especially relevant to those individuals and communities who have become disillusioned by present realities. Where political and social systems disappoint, Daniel provides hope. In contexts of oppressive, even anti-God, governments, Daniel infuses courage. When the strong undertow of secular values confuses, Daniel calls for clear choices. As the siren song of cultural compromise lures, Daniel gives reason for restraint. Century after century, the pages of Daniel have infused the faithful with fortitude.

Jim Edlin is professor of biblical literature and languages and the dean of the school of religion and philosophy at MidAmerica Nazarene University. He earned an MDiv from Nazarene Theological Seminary and a ThM and PhD in Old Testament studies from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is also the author of Discovering the Old Testament. He is a frequent contributor to Adult Faith Connection and Illustrated Bible Life.

Mark

  • Author: Kent Brower
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Kent Brower offers insight into the intricacies of Mark. With verse-by-verse commentary, Brower considers the literary features, theological themes, and hermeneutical issues present in the text.

Kent Brower has taught and guest lectured at colleges, universities, and seminaries around the world for more than 30 years. He has earned degrees from Canadian Nazarene College, Eastern Nazarene College, and the University of Manchester—under the supervision of Professor F. F. Bruce. Brower currently serves as vice principal and senior lecturer in biblical studies at Nazarene Theological College in Manchester, England.

Luke 1–9

  • Author: David A. Neale
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 220

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Many stories from the Gospel of Luke have entered our shared imagination. Only Luke tells us about Zechariah and Elizabeth and the birth of John the Baptist. Likewise, it is Luke who tells us about Mary’s visit from Gabriel and the joyous encounter some months later with Elizabeth. Luke writes of Mary’s song of joy, the shepherds at the manger, and the adoration of Anna and Simeon in the temple.

Other well-known stories are found only in Luke: the boy Jesus in the temple, the good samaritan, the prodigal son, the pharisee and the tax collector praying in the temple, and the diminutive Zacchaeus high up in a tree. In his post-resurrection narrative, Luke alone portrays the disciples walking along the road to Emmaus after the resurrection, heads bent in conversation with the risen Jesus. And alone among the evangelists, Luke describes the ascension of Jesus in detail in chapter 24 of the Gospel, and then further in Acts 1.

David A. Neale is vice president and academic dean of Booth University College in Winnipeg and professor emeritus at Ambrose University College (formerly Canadian Nazarene University College) in Calgary. He holds a BA in sociology from Idaho State University, and MA in theology from Fuller Theological Seminary, and a PhD from the University of Sheffield, England.

Romans 1–8

  • Author: George Lyons and William Greathouse
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In November 1515, Martin Luther, Augustinian monk and doctor of sacred theology at the University of Wittenberg, began his expositions of Romans. As he prepared his lectures he came to see more clearly the meaning of Paul’s gospel of justification by faith. The phrase the “righteousness of God” he had once hated as demanding what he could not deliver. Now in his study he came to see righteousness as a gift of God by which a person came to live, by faith. And he felt himself reborn. The consequence of this new insight the world knows. The Protestant Reformation had been born.

Throughout the centuries this Epistle has in a peculiar way been able to furnish an impulse for spiritual renewal. When the church had drifted away from the gospel, a deep study of Romans has repeatedly been the means by which the loss has been recovered.

William Greathouse is general superintendent emeritus at the Church of the Nazarene. He has also served as president, dean of religion, and professor at Trevecca Nazarene College. He also served faithfully as the president of Nazarene Theological Seminary. He has authored numerous books and served as a pastor on the Tennessee District. He holds degrees from Lambuth College, Trevecca Nazarene College, and Vanderbilt University.

George Lyons has been professor of New Testament at Northwest Nazarene since 1991, after teaching 14 years at Olivet Nazarene University. He has also served as a visiting professor at Nazarene Theological Seminary, Point Loma Nazarene University, Mount Vernon Nazarene University, Nazarene Theological College, Southeast Asia Nazarene Bible College, and European Nazarene College. He has also taught in China. He is a past president of the Wesleyan Theological Society and a member of the Society of Biblical Literature. He holds degrees from Olivet Nazarene University and Nazarene Theological Seminary as well as a PhD from Emory University.

Romans 9–16

  • Author: George Lyons and William Greathouse
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In November 1515, Martin Luther, Augustinian monk and doctor of sacred theology at the University of Wittenberg, began his expositions of Romans. As he prepared his lectures he came to see more clearly the meaning of Paul’s gospel of justification by faith. The phrase the “righteousness of God” he had once hated as demanding what he could not deliver. Now in his study he came to see righteousness as a gift of God by which a person came to live, by faith. And he felt himself reborn. The consequence of this new insight the world knows. The Protestant Reformation had been born.

Throughout the centuries this Epistle has in a peculiar way been able to furnish an impulse for spiritual renewal. When the church had drifted away from the gospel, a deep study of Romans has repeatedly been the means by which the loss has been recovered.

William Greathouse is general superintendent emeritus at the Church of the Nazarene. He has also served as president, dean of religion, and professor at Trevecca Nazarene College. He also served faithfully as the president of Nazarene Theological Seminary. He has authored numerous books and served as a pastor on the Tennessee District. He holds degrees from Lambuth College, Trevecca Nazarene College, and Vanderbilt University.

George Lyons has been professor of New Testament at Northwest Nazarene since 1991, after teaching 14 years at Olivet Nazarene University. He has also served as a visiting professor at Nazarene Theological Seminary, Point Loma Nazarene University, Mount Vernon Nazarene University, Nazarene Theological College, Southeast Asia Nazarene Bible College, and European Nazarene College. He has also taught in China. He is a past president of the Wesleyan Theological Society and a member of the Society of Biblical Literature. He holds degrees from Olivet Nazarene University and Nazarene Theological Seminary as well as a PhD from Emory University.

2 Corinthians

  • Author: Frank G. Carver
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 378

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

As Philippians amazes us with its unveiling of the quality of Paul’s commitment as a Christian, 2 Corinthians astounds us by its revelation of the radical caliber of his commitment as a servant and apostle of Christ. Open to view in this letter is the heartthrob of that gospel ministry that belongs to every member of Christ, clergy and laity alike—its life commitment, its divine resources, and its cross/resurrection character. Witness is borne to the inescapable truth that the mission of the church as the body of Christ is to carry on the self-giving, sacrificial, and suffering ministry of Jesus.

To the contemporary church this letter raises questions about the shape of its message and the nature and style of its ministry. The theological dimension of the letter is of crucial significance for the self-understanding of the church in today’s world.

Frank G. Carver is professor emeritus of religion, Point Loma Nazarene University. Carver is retired as professor of biblical theology and Greek. He holds degrees from Taylor University, Nazarene Theological Seminary, Princeton Theological Seminary, and a PhD from New College, University of Edinburgh, Scotland, with postgraduate work at Claremont Graduate School. He has pastored churches in both the United States and in Scotland.

Galatians

  • Author: George Lyons
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This letter claims the apostle Paul wrote it. No serious contemporary scholar questions that claim. In fact, most appeal to Galatians to assess the authenticity of the other Pauline letters. It remains uncertain what influence Paul’s anonymous co-senders may also have had on the letter’s composition.

George Lyons has been professor of New Testament at Northwest Nazarene since 1991, after teaching 14 years at Olivet Nazarene University. He has also served as a visiting professor at Nazarene Theological Seminary, Point Loma Nazarene University, Mount Vernon Nazarene University, Nazarene Theological College, Southeast Asia Nazarene Bible College, and European Nazarene College. He has also taught in China. He is a past president of the Wesleyan Theological Society and a member of the Society of Biblical Literature. He holds degrees from Olivet Nazarene University and Nazarene Theological Seminary as well as a PhD from Emory University.

Philippians

  • Author: Dean Flemming
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

One of the shortest of Paul’s letters, Philippians is perhaps the most beloved by the church. No doubt, this is due in part to its high concentration of memorable passages that constantly challenge and encourage the people of God. What is more, the letter glows with affection and joy. The imprisoned Paul who writes Philippians is not hard to love. But we should not allow the letter’s warm and pastoral tone to mask its theological importance. Philippians is practical, but it is hardly “lightweight.” It holds some deeply theological reflections, particularly about Christ and the cruciform character of life in Christ.

Philippians is arguably Paul’s most personal letter. It gives us an intimate glimpse into the self-understanding of this incarcerated apostle to the gentiles. Paul airs his inmost thoughts, tells his personal story, and testifies to his burning passion to know Christ his Lord and to make Him known. He also reveals his deep love and affection for this church, which has faithfully partnered with him in ministry from its earliest days.

But this letter is not about Paul. Above all, Philippians is concerned with the advance of the gospel and the formation of a local Christian community—a congregation that faces pressures from both inside and outside the church. Paul’s theological response to his own situation and that of his audience yields a Christ-centered letter that continues to shape Christian communities today.

Dean Flemming has written what should become "the commentary of first reference" on the Apostle Paul’s letter to the Philippians. He is thoroughly conversant with all of the serious scholarship on Philippians to date. But he makes scholarship easily accessible to average readers and points them to further reading on subjects he must treat in summary fashion. I highly recommend this commentary.

George Lyons, professor of New Testament, Northwest Nazarene University

Dean Flemming (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is a lecturer in New Testament at European Nazarene College in Buesingen, Germany. His other publications include Contextualization in the New Testament: Patterns for Theology and Mission.

James

  • Author: C. Jeanne Orjala Serrão
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 191

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of James is full of advice on how Christians should live. Thus, some say it contradicts Paul’s gospel of grace and faith, and they question its place in the canon. However, this commentary will show that James’ and Paul’s thoughts are complementary, not contradictory.

C. Jeanne Orjala Serrão is professor of biblical literature and dean of the school of theology and philosophy at Mount Vernon Nazarene University in Mount Vernon, Ohio where she founded and is the coordinator for the Bi-Annual Women In Ministry Networking Day. Serrão has served as an education pastor and Christian school administrator in Rancho Cucamonga, California. She has taught at European Nazarene College and has served as an adjunct professor for Trevecca Nazarene University, Asuza Pacific University, Claremont School of Theology (summer licensing school), and Nazarene Bible College online program. She earned her BA in biblical literature from Mid-America Nazarene University, and a MDiv and a MA in missions from Nazarene Theological Seminary and her PhD degree from Claremont Graduate University. She is an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene.

1 & 2 Peter and Jude

  • Author: Daniel Powers
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 302

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Peter is without question the most prominent of the disciples of Jesus. Based on Peter’s prominent role, one would expect any letters associated with Peter to play an equally significant role among the New Testament canonical writings. But this has not been the case.

 

This inattention is unfortunate, because 1 Peter contains significant theology and pastoral care. Wherever the church has undergone suffering, 1 Peter has proven to be extremely relevant. Suffering is not usually a popular or attractive theme. But if Jesus and Paul are correct, the church will suffer. Whenever that occurs, 1 Peter stands as a source of comfort and guidance.

2 Peter offers a message today’s believers should not be so quick to ignore. Believers can learn from the ancient message of 2 Peter to be on guard against postmodern forms of ethical relativism and theological pluralism. This letter reminds Christians that the only solid foundation for truth is found in the Scriptures and the apostolic tradition.

Jude is one of the shortest letters in the Bible. Sandwiched between the letters of John and Revelation, Jude is arguably the least well-known writing of the Christian Scriptures. Nonetheless, the message of Jude is a relevant and needed warning against false teaching and pseudo-Christianity. Jude sounds the alarm against a form of Christianity that tries to separate Christian belief from Christian behavior. The chords of Jude’s message seem out of tune in the cacophony of today’s popular clamor for tolerance and moral relativity. But its message is as necessary as ever.

Daniel G. Powers is professor of Bible at Nazarene Bible College. He has also served as Bible lecturer at European Nazarene College. This ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene also holds degrees from Point Loma College, Nazarene Theological Seminary as well as a PhD from Leiden University.

1, 2, 3 John

  • Author: Rick Williamson
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 220

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

First John presents lofty claims: “I write this to you so that you will not sin” (2:1); “No one who is born of God will continue to sin” (3:9); and “Anyone born of God does not continue to sin” (5:18). These must be understood in their original context, without dismissing their enduring spiritual implications. This commentary attempts to balance the scriptural call to holy living with the pastoral call to treat redemptively those who fail.

The letters of 2 John and 3 John offer a significant window into the life of first-century churches. Readers encounter issues of ecclesiology (church leadership, gender issues, and how the churches were interconnected) and social/cultural realities. Here we see especially how hospitality in the early churches was related to itinerant evangelism.

Rick Williamson is professor of biblical literature at Mount Vernon Nazarene University. He has also served as chaplain for adult and graduate studies, was the professor of Bible for the Nazarene Bible college, served as a hospital chaplain, a military chaplain, and pastored in Iowa and Indiana. He holds degrees from Southern Baptist Seminary, University of Iowa, Nazarene Theological Seminary, and MidAmerica Nazarene University.

Revelation

  • Author: Carol Rotz
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Throughout its history, Revelation has suffered misinterpretations from allegory to literal manipulations, including the development of spectacular end-time scenarios. These caricatures of Revelation fail to grasp its foundational theology, reassuring promises, hopeful evangelism, and especially its pastoral nature. Carol Rotz moves meticulously through this rich descriptive letter, focusing on the truth of the biblical text.

Carol Rotz received her BA degree in religious education from Northwest Nazarene University, BTheol from Canadian University College, MA from Olivet Nazarene University and the University of Port Elizabeth, and a DPhil from Rand Afrikaans University. Rotz retired as a member of the faculty of the School of Theology and Christian Ministries at Northwest Nazarene University where she was the chair of the religion department. She teaches graduate and undergraduate Bible and theology. Rotz served internationally in mission education for 20 years.

Product Details

  • Title: New Beacon Bible Commentary
  • Series: New Beacon Bible Commentary (NBBC)
  • Publisher: Beacon Hill
  • Volumes: 19
  • Pages: 5,578