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Understanding the Bible Commentary Series Rental (36 vols.)
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Overview

This user-friendly commentary series helps any reader navigate the Bible’s sometimes-difficult terrain. Each of the 36 volumes breaks down the barriers between the ancient and modern worlds, revealing the power and meaning of the biblical texts to contemporary readers.

The contributors tackle interpretation using the full range of critical methodologies and practices—yet they do so as people of faith who hold the text in the highest regard. They present a careful section-by-section exposition of the biblical books with highlighted key terms and phrases and transliterated Hebrew and Greek words. Notes at the close of each chapter provide additional textual and technical comments for those who want to dig deeper. A bibliography, as well as Scripture and subject indexes, is also included.

The Understanding the Bible Commentary Series offers pastors, students, and laypeople commitment to accessibility without sacrificing serious scholarship. In the Logos edition, each Scripture passage links to your favorite translation, and the series is easy to study side by side with your other commentaries. You can search by topic or Scripture with remarkably fast results!

This is the rebranded version of the New International Biblical Commentary: Old Testament and New Testament. It contains all the same content.

Interested in purchasing just a few of these titles? Check out Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: Old Testament (18 vols.) and Understanding the Bible Commentary Series: New Testament (18 vols.) for smaller collections.

Interested in having this collection for purchase? Learn more about the complete Understanding the Bible Commentary series.

Key Features

  • Provides section-by-section commentary
  • Contains additional study notes at the end of each chapter
  • Includes a bibliography and Scripture and subject indexes in each volume

Individual Titles

Genesis

  • Author: John E. Hartley
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Genesis is the chronological and theological gateway to the Bible. It lays the foundations for understanding God, humanity, and his dealings with us. It introduces his promise: the seed of the Gospel. Its stories still resonate with our own experience and pilgrimage with God. This skillfully written commentary guides the reader through the fascinating narrative of the world’s early generations and the beginning of God’s people.

John E. Hartley is professor of Old Testament and chairperson of biblical studies at the C. P. Haggard Graduate School of Theology, Azusa Pacific University. He is ordained in the Free Methodist Church, and he has authored commentaries on Job and Leviticus.

Exodus

  • Author: James K. Bruckner
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 368

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Exodus includes some of the Old Testament’s most dramatic scenes, as well as themes that are foundational to the rest of the Bible. God delivers, provides for, and forms a people for himself, patiently teaching them to trust him. This commentary helps the reader understand and apply this wonderful and ever-relevant book on a deeper level.

James K. Bruckner is professor of Old Testament at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago and is an ordained minister in the Evangelical Covenant Church. He is the author of Implied Law in the Abraham Narrative; Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk, and Zephaniah in The NIV Application Commentary; and numerous scholarly articles.

Leviticus, Numbers

  • Author: W. H. Bellinger, Jr.
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Amidst the laws and lists, Leviticus and Numbers display the holiness and awesomeness of God, the importance of purity, the nature of worship, the value of obedience, and the consequences of disobedience in the early life of Israel. This commentary takes on these two often neglected books of Scripture with the conviction that modern believers can gain much benefit from them.

W. H. Bellinger Jr. is W. Marshall and Lulie Craig Chairholder in Bible, chair of the Department of Religion, and professor of religion at Baylor University, and is an ordained Baptist minister. His other publications include Psalms: Reading and Studying the Book of Praises and The Testimony of Poets and Sages.

Deuteronomy

  • Author: Christopher J. H. Wright
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 368

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Deuteronomy records Moses’ parting words to Israel’s new generation on the brink of the Promised Land. He recounts their history, sets before them God’s covenant and laws, and instructs them on being God’s people in the world. The author passionately explains this important theological book, with a particular eye toward implications for faithful life and witness in our own day.

Christopher J. H. Wright is the principal of All Nations Christian College in Ware, United Kingdom. He taught for five years at Union Biblical Seminary in India. He received his PhD from Cambridge University, and he is ordained in the Church of England. He is the author of The God I Don’t Understand, God’s People in God’s Land, Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament, and The Mission of God’s People.

Joshua, Judges, Ruth

  • Authors: Cheryl A. Brown, J. Gordon Harris, and Michael S. Moore
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Joshua, Judges, and Ruth tell the history of Israel’s early, premonarchical life in Canaan. Their narratives mix exhilarating stories of God’s deliverance and somber examples of the people’s disobedience. They also include elements that are strange to modern readers. The commentators explore the history and culture of the era to explain the difficult issues raised and relate the lessons to contemporary Christian life.

Cheryl A. Brown is an ordained American Baptist minister, and she is currently involved in theological education in Eastern Europe and the Middle East with the European Baptist Federation.

J. Gordon Harris is professor of Old Testament and director of doctoral studies at North American Baptist Seminary. He is also a chaplain in the Army Reserves and National Guard.

Michael S. Moore is assistant professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Arizona and is a preaching minister at the Tatum Boulevard Church of Christ in Phoenix.

1 and 2 Samuel

  • Author: Mary J. Evans
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The books of 1 and 2 Samuel tell the story of an important time in Israel’s history: the beginning of the monarchy under Saul and the rise and reign of King David. It’s a story of individual people as they relate to God. It’s also a story of politics and the dynamics of power—including its use and abuse.

Mary J. Evans is a lecturer in Old Testament and the director of the Christian Life and Ministry course at the London Bible College. Her publications include Woman in the Bible and Prophets of the Lord, and she is an editor of the Study Bible for Women: The New Testament.

1 and 2 Kings

  • Author: Iain W. Provan
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In contrast to literary and historical skepticism about the accounts of Israel and Judah in the divided kingdom, Provan examines 1 and 2 Kings as a unified and historical narrative. He helps the reader see that these books provide insight into the kings and prophets—and teach about God and his ways.

Iain W. Provan is the Marshall Sheppard Professor of Biblical Studies at Regent College. He is also an ordained minister of the Church of Scotland.

1 and 2 Chronicles

  • Author: Louis C. Jonker
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this commentary, Jonker reads 1 and 2 Chronicles as literature that negotiates a new socioreligious identity in a period of political transition.

Louis C. Jonker is professor of Old Testament at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa. He has researched as a fellow of the Alexander von Humbolt Foundation at the University of Tübingen on numerous occasions. In his research on Second Temple Judaic literature, he focuses on the relationship between history-writing and identity negotiation. He has edited various volumes on this topic and published extensively on the biblical books of Chronicles.

Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther

  • Author: Leslie C. Allen and Timothy S. Laniak
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Allen and Laniak direct the reader’s attention to the literary elements of these three postexilic books while examining the books’ historical setting and details—which, in turn, point to valuable lessons. Though the focus is on human activity, the hand of God in restoration and deliverance is clearly seen. This helpful commentary sheds light on these oft-misunderstood books.

Leslie C. Allen is senior professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary. He has written many books, including commentaries on Ezekiel, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Psalms, and Jeremiah.

Timothy S. Laniak is professor of Old Testament at Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary. He is the author of Shepherds after My Own Heart: Pastoral Traditions and Leadership in the Bible.

Job

  • Author: Gerald H. Wilson
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 512

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Job delves into questions as old as humanity and as contemporary as today’s headlines. How does God’s justice work? How are we to understand suffering? More importantly, how are we to respond to it? Through careful analysis and explanation of Job’s dialogue, Wilson sheds light on its core message: a call to faithfully persevere by entrusting the answers to God.

Gerald H. Wilson received his PhD from Yale University, and he was a professor of Old Testament and biblical Hebrew at Azusa Pacific University. He wrote The Editing of the Hebrew Psalter and numerous articles for journals, encyclopedias, and reviews.

Psalms

  • Author: Craig C. Broyles
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 560

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Psalms are beloved for their poetic beauty, poignant expression of human emotion and spiritual experience, and soaring depictions of God’s glory. This commentary examines literary elements to help understand each psalm as a whole. Further, it highlights the psalms in their liturgical role as part of Israel’s worship, with an eye toward enriching contemporary worship and prayer.

Craig C. Broyles is a professor of religious studies at Trinity Western University, Canada. He is author of The Conflict of Faith and Experience: A Form-Critical and Theological Study of Selected Lament Psalms and co-editor of Writing and Reading the Scroll of Isaiah: Studies of an Interpretive Tradition.

Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs

  • Authors: Elizabeth Huwiler and Roland E. Murphy
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The authors help you understand Hebrew thought expressed in wisdom literature and poetry. Murphy brings clarity to Proverbs via literary insight and intrabook connections. Huwiler sets Ecclesiastes in the larger biblical context and offers a reliable guide through this consideration of existence and meaning. He explores the rich imagery of Song of Songs—a celebration of the goodness of human sexuality and love.

Elizabeth Huwiler contributed the commentary on Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs to Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, vol. 12 of the New International Biblical Commentary Old Testament series. She is associate professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia and an ordained minister of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Roland E. Murphy (deceased 2002) was the George Washington Ivey Emeritus Professor of Biblical Studies at Duke University and an adjunct professor at the Washington Theological Union. He was coeditor of the New Jerome Biblical Commentary, and he wrote numerous articles, books, and commentaries.

Isaiah

  • Author: John Goldingay
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Often quoted in the New Testament and known for its beautiful descriptions of God and his Servant, Isaiah is a favorite among Old Testament books. With clarity and insight, Goldingay guides the reader through this magnificent book, drawing out its themes of God’s holiness and majesty, the nature of God’s people, and true biblical spirituality.

John Goldingay is David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is ordained in the Episcopal Church and is the author of numerous books, including Old Testament Theology volumes 13 and commentaries on Daniel, the Psalms, and the Minor Prophets.

Jeremiah, Lamentations

  • Author: Tremper Longman
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 432

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Jeremiah is a long and complex book written in the closing years of Judah before the exile. Longman provides clear and accessible commentary, drawing out covenant as a central theme: the people’s violation, the consequences, and the promise of a new covenant to come. He also provides solid help for understanding and applying the ancient genre of lament found in Lamentations.

Tremper Longman III is the Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California. Before coming to Westmont, he taught at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia for 18 years. He has authored or coauthored numerous books, including An Introduction to the Old Testament, How to Read Proverbs, and commentaries on Daniel, Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Job, and Song of Songs.

Ezekiel

  • Author: Steven Tuell
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 384

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The modern reader encounters unfamiliar territory in Ezekiel, with its otherworldly visions and the peculiar actions of its author. Ezekiel presents a message of doom and judgment followed by an equally powerful message of hope and restoration. Through helpful literary analysis and theological reflection, Tuell assists the reader in seeing the richness and ongoing relevance of this book for today.

Steven Tuell is the James A. Kelso Associate Professor of Old Testament at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. He has authored a study of Ezekiel 40–48 in the Harvard Semitic Monographs series, as well as a commentary on 1 and 2 Chronicles in the Interpretation series. With John Strong, he coedited Constituting the Community: Studies on the Polity of Ancient Israel in Honor of S. Dean McBride, Jr.

Daniel

  • Author: William Nelson
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

William Nelson’s section-by-section commentary on Daniel helps you navigate the sometimes-difficult terrain of this prophetical book.

William Nelson is a professor of Old Testament at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California.

Minor Prophets, vol. 1

  • Author: Elizabeth Achtemeier
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume includes commentary on the first six books of the Minor Prophets: Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah. Though varied in setting, style, audience, and theme, these books share at least one commonality: each is an important message from God. With interpretive skill and theological passion, Achtemeier helps the reader see the importance of these messages for today.

Elizabeth Achtemeier was an adjunct professor of Bible and homiletics at Union Theological Seminary in Virginia. She is the author of a number of books, including Nature, God, and Pulpit and Preaching from the Old Testament.

Minor Prophets, vol. 2

  • Author: John Goldingay and Pamela Scalise
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume includes commentary on the second six books of the Minor Prophets: Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. With clear writing and technical expertise, the authors skillfully navigate the various interpretive challenges these books present, helping the reader understand and apply these ancient messages from God in today’s world.

John Goldingay is David Allan Hubbard Professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is ordained in the Episcopal Church and is the author of numerous books, including Old Testament Theology volumes 13 and commentaries on Daniel, the Psalms, and Isaiah.

Pamela Scalise is an associate professor of Old Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, Seattle Campus. She is the author, with Gerald Keown and Thomas Smothers, of Jeremiah 26–52.

Matthew

  • Author: Robert H. Mounce
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume reveals how Matthew developed and delivered five main teaching emphases that simultaneously gave the growing early church a rich and complete understanding of Jesus’ sayings and demonstrated how he fulfilled many messianic prophecies.

Robert H. Mounce . . . is a gifted educator and communicator. He blends scholarship with exposition, and the result is consistently helpful for study, encouraging for sermon or lesson preparation, and a personal blessing for those desiring to grow in understanding God’s word. . . . Mounce offers insight as well as refreshment.

Book News and Notes

Robert H. Mounce is an emeritus president of Whitworth University and is the author of many books and countless articles. He served on the translation committees for the NIV, NLT, and ESV.

Mark

  • Author: Larry W. Hurtado
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume transports modern readers back to the days of Mark’s original audience and helps us to understand and apply his unique writing and challenges to the church. Very possibly the oldest written account of the ministry of Jesus that we possess, the Gospel of Mark is a vivid and fast-paced narrative of the Good News about Jesus.

Hurtado has an excellent feel for Mark, focusing especially on the theological meaning of the gospel. He is surefooted in exposition of difficult passages, refusing to get bogged down in detail but at the same time refusing to provide a superficial answer. . . . The high quality of Hurtado’s scholarship shines through his engaging prose.

—K. E. Brower, senior lecturer in biblical studies, Nazarene Theological College

Larry W. Hurtado is an emeritus professor of New Testament language, literature, and theology and emeritus director of the Centre for the Study of Christian Origins at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. An internationally respected New Testament scholar, he is an expert on the Gospels, the apostle Paul, early Christology, the Jewish background of the New Testament, and New Testament textual criticism.

Luke

  • Author: Craig A. Evans
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Packing a lot of historical detail into a small space, Luke is a perfect introduction to this beautiful and theologically rich Gospel. The clear writing and logical explanations help you understand Luke’s difficult passages and the scholarly discussions about them.

Craig Evans’ volume on Luke is a model of the series. The writer is as aware of the main questions which dominate Lucan scholarship today as he is of its methods and useful findings.

—Max Turner, emeritus professor of New Testament, London School of Theology

This commentary fulfils the aims of the series in an admirable way. . . . The presentation of the major themes and emphases is concise and well done. Because of contemporary controversies there is a special section on the problem of the supposed anti-Semitic aspects of Luke. . . . [Craig Evans] shows his mastery of Lucan study. . . . The commentary ought to be in all theological libraries.

—P. M. Meagher, Institute of Religious Studies

Craig A. Evans is the Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament at Acadia Divinity College in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. He is a frequent contributor to scholarly journals and the author or editor of numerous publications.

John

  • Author: J. Ramsey Michaels
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

John the apostle, the last of the original 12, writes the final and most spiritual of the four Gospels. His intention is to clearly announce that Jesus is the eternal Son of God who has come in the flesh to redeem the world. This volume unpacks and explains the beautiful and rich signs and symbols that John used so that “you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”

J. Ramsey Michaels is emeritus professor of religious studies at Missouri State University, Springfield. He has taught New Testament at Gordon-Conwell Seminary, Fuller Seminary, and most recently, Bangor Seminary. Michaels has written commentaries on 1 Peter, Revelation, Hebrews, and John.

Acts

  • Author: David J. Williams
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 512

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Acts leaves no stone unturned as it brings every feature of interest and debate about the book of Acts to our attention. Careful and accurate, this incisive exploration of Luke’s account of the events following the resurrection will shed light on cultural and political realities at the time the church was in its infancy.

Williams has left virtually no stone unturned in his attempt to bring every feature of interest and debate to the reader’s attention . . . this well-written commentary is recommended to all, teacher and student alike.

Craig A. Evans, Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Acadia Divinity College

David J. Williams served as the vice principal of Ridley College, University of Melbourne. His publications include The Promise of His Coming and Paul’s Metaphors.

Romans

  • Author: James R. Edwards
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Romans is a towering epistle and arguably Paul’s most difficult letter to understand and interpret. This volume clearly shows the goodness of God as displayed in his righteousness revealed in Christ for our salvation. Enjoy this edifying journey through the most logical and doctrinally oriented of Paul’s letters.

James Edwards . . . has written the commentary I have been looking for: an exposition of the English text of Romans that takes account of the latest scholarship, refuses to duck the tough theological questions that keep popping up in Romans, and communicates in uncluttered English and effective illustrations.

Critical Review of Books in Religion

James R. Edwards is the Bruner-Welch Professor of Theology at Whitworth University. He is a member of the Center of Theological Inquiry in Princeton.

1 Corinthians

  • Author: Marion L. Soards
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

1 Corinthians is a clear, up-to-date, and thoroughly understandable treatment of Paul’s letter to the church at Corinth, focusing attention on what the text actually means rather than scholarship about the text. It addresses many relevant issues, including sexual immorality, religious diversity, and the false teaching among leaders in Corinth. It also sheds light on how that culture affected the early church, revealing how many of those persistent problems are still faced by Christians in the world today.

Soards’ commentary is a clear, up-to-date, balanced, religiously sensitive treatment of 1 Corinthians. Aimed at the general reader, it will find a welcome home in college and seminary classrooms and in the pastor’s study.

Charles H. Talbert, distinguished professor of religion, Baylor University

This commentary is solid but readable, welcoming yet challenging. It focuses attention on the biblical text rather than on scholarship about the text. This commentary should be the first one students read when studying 1 Corinthians.

Alan Culpepper, dean, McAfee School of Theology, Mercer University

Here is a commentary abreast of contemporary scholarship communicated in a readable style. It fulfills the goal of the series for which it is written. I recommend it for college and seminary students.

Restoration Quarterly

Marion L. Soards is a professor of New Testament studies at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. The author of more than 20 books, he is active in a number of scholarly societies and associations, and he has published dozens of articles and reviews in leading theological dictionaries and professional journals worldwide.

2 Corinthians

  • Author: James M. Scott
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 304

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The apostle Paul writes a letter to the church in Corinth that defends his calling and exhorts unity through love as the church collects gifts for believers in Jerusalem. He also helps us understand and act on the truth that Christianity does not renounce and forsake the world but, in love, renews it. This commentary offers an in-depth look at this letter full of reconciliation and harmony.

Don’t be fooled by its size! Scott’s commentary is to the point, clearly written, and filled with provocative proposals for reading this complex letter. From the centrality of Paul’s self-understanding and the unity of the letter to merkabah mysticism, Korah’s rebellion, and the Jewish concept of the nations, Scott’s reading rightly reminds us of just how Jewish the Apostle to the Gentiles was and of how much we must know his milieu to understand his message! Here is an insightful introduction to both the influences and intent of 2 Corinthians.

Scott J. Hafemann, St. Mary’s College, University of St. Andrews

James M. Scott is a professor of religious studies at Trinity Western University. He is the author of Paul and the Nations, Adoption as Sons of God, and Exile.

Galatians

  • Author: L. Ann Jervis
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Paul’s letter to the church in Galatia is among the most riveting, personal, and persuasive of the apostle’s writings. This volume provides delightful insights into Paul’s mission-minded heart by detailing the many ways he asserts adherence to the gospel of Jesus and by pointing out his opposition to the false gospel of his adversaries.

An informed, perceptive, and readable exposition of Galatians—a truly excellent introductory commentary for ‘the Christian community at large,’ which is its intended audience.

Richard N. Longenecker, distinguished emeritus professor of New Testament, McMaster Divinity College

The most helpful contribution that this commentary brings to its intended audience is its concise and even-handed introduction. Jervis addresses the situation and opponents and the date and audience options in a way that would be very helpful for a lay Bible reader who might otherwise be overwhelmed by the competing theories expressed in a more technical commentary. . . . Another feature that adds value to the commentary is the additional notes contained at the end of each section. These notes reflect Jervis’ expertise in the field, and often include excellent exegetical comments, added background information, helpful bibliographic references, and surveys of the various ways in which a phrase or verse have been interpreted. . . . In the end Jervis’ commentary is a very concise, well-written and reliable exposition of the ‘New Perspective’ approach to Galatians.

Ashland Theological Journal

L. Ann Jervis is a professor of New Testament at Wycliffe College and Trinity College. She is the author of The Purpose of Romans and coeditor of The Gospel in Paul.

Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon

  • Author: Arthur G. Patzia
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon discusses the origin, authorship, purpose, and contents of these New Testament letters. Scholarly, yet easy to understand, this volume explores the nuances of Paul’s messages to the church, which deal with many of the same issues faced by the church today.

Arthur Patzia is the former senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary, Northern California, and in retirement serves as an adjunct professor. A distinguished scholar, he is the author of several books, including The Making of the New Testament, The Emergence of the Church, and the Pocket Dictionary of Biblical Terms.

Philippians

  • Author: F. F. Bruce
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The letter from Paul known as the ‘epistle of joy’ is a thank-you note to the believers at Philippi for their help in his hour of need. It provides instruction on Christian unity. His central thought is simple: only in Jesus are real unity and joy possible. This commentary pulls the rich truth from this letter and makes it live for us today.

This is a valuable commentary. . . . I find [F. F. Bruce’s] exposition and exegetical/philological judgments and comments very competent and insightful. He is very fair and gives the opinion of others in detail while he justifies his own judgments with good argumentation.

—P. M. Meagher, Institute of Religious Studies

F. F. Bruce (1910–1990) was a lecturer in Greek at the Universities of Edinburgh and Leeds, then head of the new Department of Biblical History and Literature at Sheffield University. He was the Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at the University of Manchester from 1959 until his retirement in 1978.

1 and 2 Thessalonians

  • Author: David J. Williams
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In 1 and 2 Thessalonians, you will find a concise and clear explanation of Paul’s letters to the church in Thessalonica. Written from an evangelical perspective, this commentary explains the significance of Greek terms in order to bring out the fullness of the Apostle Paul’s heart and the relevant applications to our everyday lives.

Dr. Williams has given us a fine commentary on the Thessalonian correspondence. He writes explicitly for the general reader but that does not mean that he has overlooked difficult or controversial passages. He deals with them simply in a way that we can all understand. A feature of the commentary is the way the author takes pains to explain the significance of Greek terms and thus to bring out the force of what the Apostle has written. Dr. Williams writes simply and clearly and he has put us all in his debt.

Leon Morris, former principal, Ridley College

David J. Williams was educated at the University of Melbourne and Fuller Theological Seminary and served as the vice principal of Ridley College, Melbourne. His publications include The Promise of His Coming and Paul’s Metaphors.

1 and 2 Timothy, Titus

  • Author: Gordon D. Fee
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 352

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

1 and 2 Timothy, Titus explores Paul’s heartfelt concern for the newly planted churches and the leaders who served in them. These letters of compassion, instruction, and admonition were meant to instruct and strengthen the leaders and the members of these churches. Filled with great insight taken from the original language, this volume will help you understand more deeply the pastoral love of Paul.

[Fee’s commentary on 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus] . . . is ideal for students, pastors, and teachers. It is a model of clarity and organization and consistently reflects a judicious examination of exegetical issues. Indeed . . . I think it is one of the best available [commentaries] on the Pastoral Epistles. Fee’s skill in writing commentaries is as evident in this volume as it was in his magisterial volume on 1 Corinthians.

Thomas R. Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Gordon D. Fee is an emeritus professor of New Testament studies at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is the author of several books, including the popular How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth, as well as many commentaries.

Hebrews

  • Author: Donald A. Hagner
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 304

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This commentary reveals the true purpose of the book of Hebrews: to exhort and encourage Jewish Christians to remain faithful to Jesus and not to turn back to Judaism. These words of comfort—intended to help early believers to hold fast to the Christian hope without wavering in the face of persecution, ridicule, and insults—contain lessons that can guide our own faith today.

Of all the major New Testament books none perhaps stands in greater need of elucidation and exposition for the modern reader than the letter to the Hebrews. It is therefore an occasion of much interest to the Bible-reading public that such a volume as Dr. Hagner’s . . . is on hand to assist them. . . . His writing shows that he is en rapport with the epistle, determined to let it speak its own relevant message to those who wonder how the Jewish messiah can be the world’s redeemer, and anxious to help those who find this part of the New Testament strange and forbidding.

Ralph P. Martin, distinguished scholar in residence, Fuller Theological Seminary

Donald A. Hagner is the George Eldon Ladd Professor Emeritus of New Testament and senior professor of New Testament at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. He is the author of Encountering the Book of Hebrews, The Jewish Reclamation of Jesus, New Testament Exegesis and Research: A Guide for Seminarians, and commentaries on Hebrews and Matthew. He is also coeditor of the New International Greek Testament Commentary and an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

James

  • Author: Peter H. Davids
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 192

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Discover how believers in the early church understood and applied the words of Jesus to their daily lives in this insightful exposition of the hard-hitting and practical Epistle of James. This book uncovers the beautiful harmony between faith and works, showing each to be an essential aspect of the Christian life.

Peter H. Davids is a visiting professor in Christianity at Houstin Baptist University. He has taught in seminaries and universities in Germany, Austria, the USA, and Canada, among other countries. He has written multiple commentaries and books on James, 1 Peter, and 2 Peter–Jude and coedited the Dictionary of the Later New Testament.

1 and 2 Peter, Jude

  • Author: Norman Hillyer
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 320

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In 1 and 2 Peter, Jude, you will find a concise and incisive exegesis of the Petrine epistles and Jude, even of difficult verses. Written from an evangelical perspective, this commentary brings into focus a wealth of background information from the Old Testament, Jewish intertestamental works, and other literary sources to illuminate the letters of Peter and Jude.

Hillyer’s commentary on the Petrine epistles and Jude is both concise and incisive even in its exegesis of difficult verses. His volume, written from an evangelical perspective and based on the NIV, is most appropriate as a text for undergraduate biblical students and as a supplement to personal Scripture reading for educated laity. . . . Another value of this commentary is the wealth of background that the author brings to the letters from the Old Testament, Jewish intertestamental works, and other literary sources.

Themelios

Norman Hillyer is a minister who served churches in London, Surrey, Hertfordshire, and Devon. He has also worked as the librarian at Tyndale House, Cambridge, and contributed to the New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology.

1, 2 and 3 John

  • Author: Thomas F. Johnson
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 224

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These three letters from the apostle John are personal, pastoral, and passionate pleas for the church to remain united and strong in the face of persecution. They are also treasured for their memorable teaching on love and forgiveness. Discover the evidence of what the true Christian life looks like, what true Christian care consists of, and what constitutes genuine leadership in the church.

Thomas F. Johnson is an interim academic dean at Trinity Lutheran College.

Revelation

  • Author: Robert W. Wall
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 320

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As the author of this commentary explains, the very first word of John’s composition, “revelation,” is an essential clue for the interpreter of Revelation. The primary intent of this literature is to reveal the “mysteries of God” to believers presently experiencing oppression and suffering. This commentary will help you discover the meaning behind the complex ideas and images found in this last book of the Bible.

Wall’s commentary is a valuable contribution to the study of Revelation. It interacts well with most of the leading contemporary scholarship in the field. It provides an angle of perspective on John’s vision that opens some new vistas into its meaning and provides healthy correctives of many misconceptions. This is a useful resource for college and seminary classes on Revelation and a helpful tool for those with theological/biblical training who would lead Bible studies on Revelation.

—M. Robert Mulholland Jr., Professor of New Testament, Asbury Theological Seminary

Robert W. Wall is the Paul T. Walls Professor of Scripture and Wesleyan Studies at Seattle Pacific University. In addition to his commentary on Revelation, he has authored numerous journal articles and several books, including commentaries on Colossians/Philemon, James, Acts, and the Pastoral Epistles.

Product Details

  • Title: Understanding the Bible Commentary Series
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Volumes: 36
  • Pages: 12,720