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Gathering Interest
T&T Clark Topics in New Testament Studies (11 vols.)
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Overview

The T&T Clark Topics in New Testament Studies collection includes helpful introductions to the field of biblical studies and various New Testament books as well as focused analyses of several topics in New Testament studies. These volumes will be of value to students, scholars, pastors, and interested laypeople. Steve Moyise provides an accessible introduction to the field and in An Introduction to the Catholic Epistles, Darian Lockett offers a helpful overview of James through Jude. Several other volumes present focused studies on Paul, his writings, and first-century context. Various other topics are addressed in this collection, including rhetorical analysis in Hebrews, the use of Genesis in the NT, a biblical account of Hell, and Scriptural teaching on evil and the Devil.

The Logos Bible Software editions of these volumes streamline and enhance your study. Scripture passages appear on mouseover in your preferred English translations and original-language texts, and important exegetical and theological terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. In addition, you can perform powerful searches by topic to thoroughly study issues like rhetorical analysis, Pauline theology, and the NT use of the OT.

Want more topics from T&T Clark? T&T Clark Topics in Religious Studies (9 vols.) and T&T Clark Topics in Old Testament Studies (10 vols.) are now on Pre-Publication.

Key Features

  • Accessible introduction to biblical studies
  • Concise overview of the Catholic Epistles
  • In-depth treatment of various topics in New Testament studies

Individual Titles

Introduction to Biblical Studies, Third Edition

  • Author: Steve Moyise
  • Series: T&T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This is an ideal introduction to modern biblical studies. Readers are introduced to questions of inspiration, canon, and authority, followed by chapters on historical approaches to the Bible, such as source, form, and redaction criticism. Comparisons with other literature, such as ancient flood stories or Egyptian psalms, help to set the context for a historically and culturally grounded study of the Bible. Moyise also addresses such questions as “How did we get the Bible?” and, “Why do modern versions of the Bible differ among themselves?”

Moyise considers a number of approaches to the text and themes of the Bible. Beginning with literary criticism, he shows how texts “speak” to readers and influence their attitudes, emotions, and behaviors. This is followed by an overview of liberation, feminist, and a variety of other theological approaches to Scripture.

In the third edition, Moyise has added two sections, one giving a basic outline of the biblical story together with a timeline and key dates, and another on dating the New Testament.

Steve Moyise is professor of New Testament at the University of Chichester. He is the series editor of The T&T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies and the author of several other works in the field of biblical studies.

An Introduction to the Catholic Epistles

  • Author: Darian Lockett
  • Series: T&T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book introduces the Catholic Epistles and discusses the different interpretive approaches that have been used to gain a clearer understanding of them. The first chapter defines the epistles and describes the history of their canonization. Subsequent chapters are devoted to each of the texts. The treatment of the epistles includes discussions of the social-cultural context and historical background, genre, rhetorical and structural devices, purpose of writing, and various interpretive approaches such as postcolonial and feminist perspectives. At the end of each chapter there are suggestions for further reading and a list of reflection questions. Several chapters include a section or two considering a particular interpretive issue especially relevant to the particular text. After taking up each text, Lockett considers again whether the Catholic Epistles should be read as a unified whole or simply as individual voices. Here the book interacts with the ideas of Rob Wall and David Nienhuis regarding the thematic and theological connections running through the texts. A final chapter takes up the relationship between the Pauline Epistles and the Catholic Epistles within the New Testament.

Throughout the history of modern New Testament scholarship, the Catholic Epistles have been the most neglected part of the New Testament canon, and this remains the case today despite some excellent recent work on them . . . Darian Lockett’s book will certainly help to remedy this situation. It is accessible to students and to a wider interested readership and opens up for them the scholarship on these books in a lucid and comprehensive way. He deals not only with the usual introductory questions and the standard historical critical studies, but also with the contributions of the newer methodologies: social-scientific criticism, narrative criticism, and canonical criticism. He considers the Catholic Epistles not only as individual texts, but also as forming a canonical collection. On the many disputed issues, he sets out the various arguments, leaving readers to reach their own conclusions . . .

Richard Bauckham, senior scholar, Cambridge

This is a concise, well-written introduction to the study of an all-too-often neglected corpus of New Testament texts. Lockett’s insightful examination of the historical-critical issues that pertain to James, 1–2 Peter, and Jude is augmented with an illuminating exploration of new methodological approaches that have been appropriated in the study of the Catholic Epistles. What may be the most stimulating feature of this book is Lockett’s discussion regarding the canonical shaping and function of these texts. A new generation of students will benefit greatly from this well-informed appraisal of Catholic Epistles scholarship.

—Kelly D. Liebengood, assistant professor of theology, LeTourneau University

Darian Lockett is assistant professor of New Testament at Talbot School of Theology at Biola University. He is also the author of Purity and Worldview in the Epistle of James.

Paul at the Crossroads of Cultures: Theologizing in the Space Between

  • Author: Kathy Ehrensperger
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 272

Based on recent studies in intercultural communication, Kathy Ehrensperger applies the paradigm of multilingualism to the study of Paul. Paul’s role as apostle to the nations is seen as the role of a go-between—a cultural translator. This role requires him to be fully embedded in his own tradition and also able to appreciate and understand aspects of gentile culture. Paul is viewed as involved in a process in which the meaning of the Christ event is being negotiated “in the space between” cultures, with their diverse cultural coding systems and cultural encyclopedias. Ehrenspreger argures that this is not a process of imposing Jewish culture on gentiles at the expense of gentile identity, nor is it a process of eradication of Jewish identity. Rather, Paul’s theologizing in the space between implies the task of negotiating the meaning of the Christ event in relation to, and in appreciation of, both Jewish and gentile identity.

Kathy Ehrensperger is reader in New Testament studies at the University of Wales and is the author of Reading Paul in Context: Explorations in Identity Formation: Essays in Honour of William S. Campbell and That We May Be Mutually Encouraged.

Paul’s Financial Policy: A Socio-Theological Approach

  • Author: David E. Briones
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

This book attempts to prove the consistent nature of Paul’s financial policy by drawing from his social environment and theological convictions to tease out a three-way relational pattern with God as the source of all possessions. This framework not only dictates Paul’s decision to accept or reject finances from his churches but also directly challenges long-standing claims made about Paul’s financial policy.

After outlining the various approaches that scholars have taken to make sense of Paul’s seemingly inconsistent financial policy, this book provides a close exegetical analysis of relevant passages in Philippians, 1 Corinthians, and 2 Corinthians in order to unearth the three-way relational pattern found in Philippians but absent from the Corinthian correspondence. In Paul’s positive gift-exchange relationship with the Philippians, God is acknowledged as the source of all possessions, whereas the Corinthians are criticized for striving after two-way exchanges that result in honor, power, and prestige. Next, a socio-theological reason for Paul’s refusal of Corinthian gifts is propounded. Paul refused Corinthian support, not because they desired to patronize him as a dependent client, but because they sought to be under Paul as their superior, an act that neglected God as the superior source of all gifts in the divine economy. Paul therefore refuses their support to avoid two-way gift relationships so prevalent in ancient society and to underscore the source of the gift of the gospel, the one from whom and through whom and to whom are all things—God.

David E. Briones is an adjunct professor of biblical studies at Biola and Azusa Pacific University. He completed his PhD under the supervision of professor John M. G. Barclay at Durham University.

Contours in the Text: Textual Variation in the Writings of Paul, Josephus, and the Yahad

  • Author: Jonathan D. H. Norton
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Norton-Piliavsky places Paul’s work within the context of ancient Jewish literary practice, bridging the gap between textual criticism and social history in contemporary discussions. The author argues that studies of ancient Jewish exegesis draw on two distinct analytical modes: the text-critical and the socio-historical. He then shows that the two are usually joined together in discussions of ancient Jewish literature and argues that, as a result of this, commentators often allow the text-critical approach to guide their efforts to understand historical questions. Norton argues that text-critical and historical data must be combined, but not conflated. Thus, he presents a new approach, showing that exegesis was part of an ongoing discussion, which included mutually supporting written and oral practices. Norton shows that Josephus’ and Dead Sea sectarians’ use of textual variation, like Paul’s, belongs to this discussion, demonstrating that neither Paul nor his contemporaries viewed Jewish scripture as a fixed literary monolith. Rather, they took part in a dynamic exegetical dialogue, constituted by oral, as much as textual, modes.

Jonathan Norton specializes in Second Temple Jewish history and Paul’s letters and the Dead Sea Scrolls in particular. He earned his doctorate from Oxford and lectures at the University of London. He publishes primarily on New Testament, Qumran, and the Judean manuscripts.

The Biblical Tour of Hell

  • Author: Matthew Ryan Hauge
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

It is difficult to underestimate the significance of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus in Luke 16:19–31 within the biblical tradition. Although hell occupies a prominent position in popular Christian rhetoric today, it plays a relatively minor role in the Christian canon. The most important biblical texts that explicitly describe the fate of the dead are in the Synoptic Gospels. Yet among these passages, only the Lukan tradition is intent on explicitly describing the abode of the dead—it is the only biblical tour of hell.

Hauge examines the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus in Luke 16:19–31, uniquely the only “parable” that is set within a supernatural context. The parables characteristically feature concrete realities of first-century Mediterranean life, but the majority of Luke 16:19–31 is narrated from the perspective of the tormented dead. This volume demonstrates that the distinctive features of the story of the Rich Man and Lazarus are the result of a strategic imitation, creative transformation, and Christian transvaluation of the descent of Odysseus into the house of hades in the Odyssey, Book 11—the literary model par excellence of postmortem revelation in antiquity.

Matthew Ryan Hauge earned his PhD from Claremont Graduate University and is assistant professor of biblical studies at Azusa Pacific University.

Evil and the Devil

  • Editors: Erkki Koskenniemi and Ida Fröhlich
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 272

The problem of evil has preoccupied world religions for centuries. The Old Testament contained no uniform dogma on evil powers, launching a fierce debate that has dominated theological and philosophical thought to this day.

Evil and the Devil brings together contributions from leading international scholars to chart that debate, tracing the history of evil from its origins in the Old Testament through early Judaism and the New Testament to the thought of Origen and one of the topic’s most influential theologians, Augustine. What role did evil adopt in ancient Judaism? What impact did the association of miracles with demons have upon Matthew’s Gospel? Evil and the Devil examines such questions, resulting in a fascinating and comprehensive exploration of portrayals of evil and its power and influence on religious thought.

Erkki Koskenniemi is adjunct professor of biblical studies at Abo Akademi University in Finland.

Ida Fröhlich teaches at the Pázmány Péter Catholic University in Budapest, Hungary.

Decisive Meals: Table Politics in Biblical Literature

  • Editors: Nathan MacDonald, Kathy Ehrensperger, and Luzia Sutter Rehmann
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 200

Decisive Meals discusses meal traditions and their relevance in terms of boundaries between different groups in first-century Judaism and early Christianity.

The contributors discuss different communities at different times and places under the same focus of common meals and the role they play in each socio-religious context. These communities include the postexilic community in Judaea, the Pauline communities in Asia Minor, the Roman dominated city of Caesarea, the Hellenistic Jewish community, and the emerging rabbinical community. This sheds light on power dynamics between rich and poor, well-fed and hungry, and between men and women. These questions will clarify how detailed exegesis is influenced by hermeneutical patterns and ideas about food, boundaries, and power dynamics.

Nathan MacDonald is reader in Old Testament studies at St. Andrews University in Scotland and is coeditor of A Cloud of Witnesses: The Theology of Hebrews in its Ancient Contexts with Richard Bauckham.

Kathy Ehrensperger is reader in New Testament studies at the University of Wales is the author of Reading Paul in Context: Explorations in Identity Formation: Essays in Honour of William S. Campbell and That We May Be Mutually Encouraged.

Luzia Sutter Rehmann is professor of New Testament at the University of Basel in Switzerland.

The Rhetoric of Response: A Classical Rhetorical Reading of Hebrews 10:32–12:13

  • Author: Lee Zachary Maxey
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 384

The Rhetoric of Response is an interpretation of Hebrews 10:32–12:13 from the perspective of classical rhetorical compositional theory. Maxey argues that this unit in Hebrews is deliberative rhetoric seeking to evoke in the original audience a response of faithful endurance in the face of sufferings occasioned by their faith. The text reflects the following rhetorical structure, which conforms to the standard classical forensic/deliberative speech outline: Exordium (10:32–34), Confimatio (11:1–40), and Concluiso (12:1–13).

Lee Zachary Maxey is a pastor in the Corinthian Baptist Church in Des Moines, Iowa.

Genesis in the New Testament

  • Editors: Maarten J. J. Menken and Steve Moyise
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 200

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Genesis in the New Testament is a set of expert studies on the use of Genesis in the NT. After an introductory chapter on the use of Genesis in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Second-Temple literature, each of the New Testament books that contain quotations from Genesis are discussed: Matthew, Mark, Luke-Acts, John, Paul, Deutero-Paul, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter and Jude, and Revelation.

The book provides an overview of the status, role, and function of Genesis in the first century. It considers the Greek and Hebrew manuscript traditions and offers insights into the various hermeneutical stances of the New Testament authors and the development of New Testament theology.

Maarten J. J. Menken is professor of New Testament exegesis on the faculty of Catholic theology at the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. He is also the coauthor of Psalms in the New Testament.

Steve Moyise is professor of New Testament at the University of Chichester. He is the series editor of The T&T Clark Approaches to Biblical Studies and the author of several other works in the field of biblical studies.

Abuse, Power, and Fearful Obedience: Reconsidering 1 Peter’s Commands to Wives

  • Author: Jennifer G. Bird
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 180

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Jennifer Bird examines the subjection of wives to husbands in 1 Peter with particular reference to the “Haustafel” (household code) section of the letter. Bird engages feminist critical questions, postcolonial theory, and materialist theory in her analysis. She examines the two crucial labels for understanding Petrine Christian identity—“aliens and refugees” and “royal priesthood and holy nation”—and finds them to stand in stark contrast with the commands and identity given to the wives in the Haustafel section. Similarly, the command to “honor the Emperor,” which immediately precedes the Haustafel, prompts a rich discussion of the text’s socio-political implications. According to Bird, the critical engagement of several “symptomatic irruptions” within the commands to the wives uncovers the abusive dynamic underlying this section of the letter. Finally, Bird considers the present day implications of her study.

Abuse, Power, and Fearful Obedience is overall a well-written book. Bird’s contribution to the field of postcolonial theology through this work is evident in her approach to and understanding of 1 Peter. She poses helpful and insightful questions, and presents her findings in an accessible manner.

Journal of Postcolonial Networks

Jennifer Bird is assistant professor in the department of religion and philosophy at Greensboro College in North Carolina.

Product Details

  • Title: T&T Clark Topics in New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 11
  • Pages: 2,516