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T&T Clark Studies in the Gospels and Acts (18 vols.)
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Overview

These T&T Clark academic monographs represent some of the most cutting-edge research and newest insights in the study of the Gospels and Acts. Using advances in literary analysis and linguistics such as verbal aspect research and speech-act theory, these volumes offer in-depth exegesis on important passages, theological interpretation of significant texts and themes, and a window into the world of the New Testament through which we can better understand the context and message of Scripture.

In Luke’s Demonstration to Theophilus, for the first time ever, Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Josep Rius-Camps present a full translation of Luke-Acts according to Codex Bezae, one of the most important and unique codices of the New Testament. This extensive volume is presented with a helpful introduction and discussion of the manuscripts’ textual significance. Wayne Baxter’s Israel’s Only Shepherd offers fresh insights into the first-century socio-religious context of Matthew in order to shed light on the structure and message of the first Gospel and what it tells us about the relationship between Judaism and early Christianity. Michael P. Theophilos presents an extensive study of one of the most significant and controversial passages and topics in the New Testament in his volume, The Abomination of Desolation in Matthew 24:15. In The Gospel of Matthew’s Dependence on the Didache, Alan Garrow argues for a provocative perspective on the relationship between the first Gospel and one of the earliest Christian writings outside the New Testament. His observations and conclusions raise new questions and offer new answers to the much debated Synoptic problem. Other volumes provide a wealth of information on important aspects of the Gospels and Acts.

The Logos Bible Software edition of the T&T Clark Studies in the Gospels and Acts is designed to enhance and enrich your study and understanding of the Gospels and Acts. Scripture passages link directly to English translations and original-language texts, and important theological and hermeneutical concepts link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. In addition, you can perform powerful searches by topic and find what other authors, scholars, and theologians have to say about things like the Abomination of Desolation in the Olivet Discourse, socio-literary analysis, the Synoptic Problem, and textual criticism.

For more on the Gospels and Acts from T&T Clark, be sure to check out the Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on the Gospels and Acts (16 vols.).

Key Features

  • Groundbreaking advances in the study of the Gospels and Acts
  • In-depth research on theological, exegetical, hermeneutical, and historical issues in the Gospels and Acts
  • Engagement with cutting-edge modern scholarship

Individual Titles

The Messiah, His Brothers, and the Nations (Matthew 1:1–17)

  • Author: Jason B. Hood
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Why does Matthew append “and his brothers” to Judah and Jechoniah (1:2, 11)? Secondly, why does Matthew include the following four annotations: “and Zerah by Tamar,” “by Rahab,” “by Ruth,” and “by the [wife] of Uriah” (1:3–6)? Jason B. Hood uses a composition critical approach in which he examines biblical genealogies and “summaries of Israel’s story” in order to shed light on these features of Matthew’s Gospel.

Hood asserts that the addition of “and his brothers” recalls Jesus’ royal role. Judah and Jechoniah in Second Temple literature are both understood to have reversed their wickedness and earned royal status by self-sacrifice, perhaps pointing to the self-sacrifice of Jesus for his brothers before his full enthronement. A review of scholarly explanations of the significance of the “four (five) women” in the genealogy, unearths an overlooked interpretation—Matthew does not name four women in 1:3–6 but four Gentiles (Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, and Uriah) traditionally celebrated as righteous.

Hood’s solutions are attractive and certainly worthy of consideration.

Religious Studies Review

Jason B. Hood is scholar-in-residence at Christ United Methodist Church in Memphis, TN. His published works have appeared in a variety of academic texts and journals, including the Journal of Biblical Literature.

Israel’s Only Shepherd: Matthew’s Shepherd Motif and His Social Setting

  • Author: Wayne Baxter
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 232

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Despite being recognized as the most “Jewish” Gospel, many argue that Matthew was penned by someone who sought to distance himself from Judaism. Scholars have used diverse approaches for determining the relationship between Matthew and the variegated Judaism of the first century, but few recognize the important piece that the Evangelist’s Christology—especially the shepherd motif—brings to the puzzle of his socio-religious orientation.

Wayne Baxter contends that there are distinctive tendencies in the shepherd metaphor’s appropriation by non-Christ-believing Jewish and Graeco-Roman authors, as well as Christ-believing authors approximately contemporary with Matthew, which reflect distinct patterns of thought. By comparing these uses of the shepherd metaphor, Baxter unearths clues about the Evangelist’s socio-religious orientation. Baxter is able to use this to determine the metaphor’s contribution to the overall theological framework of the Gospel, specifically, its Christology, soteriology, and the Evangelist’s view of mission. Moreover, he is able to ascertain Matthew’s socio-religious orientation and its implications for the debate surrounding the “parting of the ways’ between Judaism and Christianity.

Wayne Baxter is a pastor at Mississauga Chinese Baptist Church in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. He has lectured at King’s University College, Wilfrid Laurier University, and McMaster University.

The Abomination of Desolation in Matthew 24:15

  • Author: Michael P. Theophilos
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 296

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Michael Theophilos investigates the term “Abomination of desolation” in Matthew 24:15 proposing a revised model for understanding this enigmatic phrase. He adopts a contextual exegetical approach focusing strongly upon scriptural intertextual prophetic echoes.

Because of the primary association of the phrase with Antiochus Epiphanes in the Daniel narrative, many commentators have argued for a contra-Jewish background to Matthew 24:15. However, analysis of relevant prophetic literature reveals that similar vocabulary was often used to describe Israel’s covenantal infidelity, and its consequences. Given the influence of prophetic literature on Daniel, Theophilos argues that Matthew was theologically motivated to ironically employ the Danielic material in describing Jerusalem’s destruction. Matthew envisions the cause for this destruction as rooted in Israel’s rejection of Jesus as Messiah. In this sense, the coming “Son of Man” in Matthew 24 may be seen as a metaphorical representation of the Roman Army destroying Jerusalem in 70 AD. This understanding of “Son of Man” is consistent with the Danielic depiction where the appearance of the “Son of Man” signified the destruction of Israel’s enemies.

Michael Theophilos is lecturer in the faculty of theology and philosophy at Australian Catholic University.

Experiencing Irony in the First Gospel: Suspense, Surprise, and Curiosity

  • Author: Karl McDaniel
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 208

The Gospel of Matthew is both deliberately deceptive and emotionally compelling. Karl McDaniel explores ways in which the narrative of the Gospel of Matthew elicits and develops the emotions of suspense, surprise, and curiosity within its readers. While Matthew 1:21 invites readers to expect Jewish salvation, progressive failure of the plot’s main characters to meet Jesus’ salvation requirements creates increasing suspense for the reader. How will Jesus save “his people’? The commission to the Gentiles at the Gospel’s conclusion provokes reader surprise, and the resulting curiosity calls readers back to the narrative’s beginning. Upon rereading with a retrospective view, readers discover that the Gentile mission was actually foreshadowed throughout the narrative, even from its beginning, and they are invited to partake in Jesus’ final commission.

Karl McDaniel earned his PhD in New Testament Studies from McGill University. His research work focuses on irony, rhetoric, and intertexuality, as well as the way in which the use of these evokes emotion in readers.

Incorporated Servanthood: Commitment and Discipleship in the Gospel of Matthew

  • Author: Ben Cooper
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

How is committing oneself to God described within the Gospel of Matthew, and how is this related to becoming a disciple of Jesus? Moreover, how may reading or hearing the Gospel function to evoke such a response? To answer these questions, this study draws upon a variety of approaches in linguistics and literary studies in a new way. The resulting “pragmatic-critical” method characterizes the communicative equilibrium between the author and the subset of readers who process the text compliantly.

Readers become compliant through being persuaded in various ways of the nearness of the kingdom of heaven, a nearness brought about by the coming of Jesus to bring forgiveness and salvation to the people of God. As they empathise with Jesus’ disciples throughout the narrative, compliant readers are humbled to be served by the Servant and have their sins forgiven. At the end of the Gospel, they are incorporated into his Servant program, commissioned to serve and teach in the same pattern, participating in the task of bringing salvation to the nations.

Ben Cooper is course director of Fulwood Bible Training in Sheffield, UK, and an ordained minister in the Church of England.

The Gospel of Matthew’s Dependence on the Didache

  • Author: Alan Garrow
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book maps the relationship between Matthew’s Gospel and the Didache. No consensus regarding the nature of this relationship has yet been achieved, neither has serious consideration been given to the possibility that Matthew depended directly on the Didache. If it may be shown that such was the case, then this infamously enigmatic text may finally be used to answer a series of tantalizing questions: what is the pattern of the Synoptic relationships? How did the earliest Jewish Christians incorporate Gentiles? What was the shape of Eucharistic worship in the first century?

The enduring value of Garrow’s study is that he has supplied scholars with a pioneering and much-needed investigation. Garrow effectively calls into question all the present literature calculated to demonstrate the dependence of the Didache on Matthew’s Gospel. For this reason alone, it will have to be taken into account.

The Catholic Biblical Quarterly

Garrow’s work deserves attention, not only because he has offered an innovative analysis of the composition of the Didache, but also because he has argued his own thesis of Matthew’s use of the Didache with careful attention to detail . . . fine analytic work.

John S. Kloppenborg, chair of the Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

Like Garrow’s earlier study on Revelation, the thesis is nothing if not bold. It is worked out with meticulous care . . . including a full printing of the text of the Didache . . . The whole book is a demanding but stimulating read, and to see the traditional methods of NT source-criticism applied to a non-NT text provokes salutary reflections.

Evangelical Quarterly

Garrow’s enthusiasm for the Didache is infectious . . . many of his insights into the actual text of the Didache are lucid and offer fresh insights . . . This book deserves wide consideration

Expository Times

Meticulously argued, but engagingly written, Garrow’s monograph offers a fresh perspective on a much-debated topic. It offers new perspectives on many of the issues on which serious study of the Synoptic problem depends.

Themelios

Alan Garrow is the director of biblical studies at the St. Albans and Oxford Ministry Course.

Jesus and Time: An Interpretation of Mark 1:15

  • Author: Ma’afu Palu
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This work offers an examination of Jesus’ conception of time on the basis of Mark 1:15. Palu contends that the background which makes Mark 1:15 most intelligible is God’s covenant with day and night which is established in the act of creation, specified in prophetic eschatology, and developed in Second Temple literature. The substance of that covenant is God’s commitment to give day and night in their appointed time and God’s promise to restore Israel under David’s offspring. On the basis of recent developments in scholarly literature concerning Greek verbal aspect, this study argues that the perfect verbs in Mark 1:15 denote an ongoing dynamic of time fulfillment, closely tied to the ultimate restoration of Israel. This begins with the appearance of Jesus during the days of John the Baptist and is mapped onto two phases of the horizon of Jesus’ view of time. Palu concludes that the biblical notion of time is to be tied intimately to the hope of the restoration of Israel, ultimately manifested as the establishment of the Kingdom of God.

Ma’afu Palu is senior lecturer in biblical studies at the Sia’atoutai Theological College in Tonga. He teaches Old Testament, New Testament, and the biblical languages. He received his PhD from the University of Western Sydney through Moore Theological College in Sydney.

The Theological Role of Paradox in the Gospel of Mark

  • Author: Laura C. Sweat
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

Scholarship on the Gospel of Mark has long been convinced of the paradoxical description of two of its primary themes, Christology and discipleship. This book argues that paradoxical language pervades the entire narrative and that it serves a theological purpose in describing God’s activity.

Part one focuses on divine action present in Mark 4:10–12. In the first paradox, Mark portrays God’s revelatory acts as consistently accompanied by concealment. The second paradox is shown in the various ways in which divine action confirms, yet counters, Scripture. Finally, Mark describes God’s actions in ways that indicate both wastefulness and goodness; deeds that are further illuminated by the ongoing, yet defeated, presence of evil. Part two demonstrates that this paradoxical language is widely attested across Mark’s passion narrative, as he continues to depict God’s activity with the use of the three paradoxes observed in Mark 4. Through paradoxical narrative, Mark emphasizes God’s transcendence and presence, showing that even though Jesus has brought revelation, a complete understanding of God remains tantalizingly out of their grasp until the Eschaton (4:22).

Laura C. Sweat earned her PhD from Princeton Theological Seminary and is assistant professor of New Testament at Seattle Pacific University.

Marcan Priority without Q: Explorations in the Farrer Hypothesis

  • Editors: John C. Poirier and Jeffrey Peterson
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

This book discusses the composition of the Synoptic Gospels from the perspective of the Farrer hypothesis, a view that posits that Mark was written first, that Matthew used Mark as a source, and that Luke used both Mark and Matthew. All of the articles in the volume are written in support of the Farrer hypothesis, with the exception of the final chapter, which criticizes these articles from the perspective of the reigning Two-Source theory. The contributors engage the Synoptic problem with a more refined understanding of the options set before each of the evangelists pointing towards a deepened understanding of how works were compiled in the first and early second centuries.

Jeffrey Peterson is Jack C. and Ruth Wright Professor of New Testament at the Austin Graduate School of Theology.

John C. Poirier is chair of biblical studies at Kingswell Theological Seminary.

The Elijah-Elisha Narrative in the Composition of Luke

  • Editors: John S. Kloppenborg and Joseph Verheyden
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 208

This collection, edited by John S. Kloppenborg and Joseph Verheyden, examines the Elisha-Elijah narrative and its potential use in, and influence upon, the Gospel of Luke. The volume presents the case for the heavy influence of the Elisha-Elijah narrative upon Luke, put forward by Thomas L. Brodie and John Shelton, and includes responses to this thesis from Robert Derrenbacker, Alex Damm, F. Gerald Downing, David Peabody and Dennis MacDonald. The contributions to this volume provide fascinating insights into the composition of the Gospel of Luke and the editorial processes involved in its creation. Contributions cover different approaches to the text, including issues of intertextuality and rhetorical-critical examinations. The distinguished contributors and fast-paced debate make this book an indispensable addition to any theological library.

John S. Kloppenborg is professor and chair of the Department for the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. He is the coauthor of Apocalypticism, Anti-Semitism, and the Historical Jesus: Subtexts in Criticism.

Joseph Verheyden is professor of New Testament on the faculty of theology and religious studies at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and research associate at the University of Pretoria.

Dialogue Not Dogma: Many Voices in the Gospel of Luke

  • Author: Raj Nadella
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Nadella examines the strands of Luke’s narrative, showing that the “many voices” in the text should be celebrated as a unique feature of Luke’s writing. Lukan scholars offer varying responses to the issue of divergent viewpoints in the Gospel regarding the identity of Jesus, wealth, women, and the emphasis on doing vis-a-vis hearing. Many forms of criticism attempt to explain or harmonize these apparent contradictions. Conversely, Raj Nadella argues that there is no dominant viewpoint in Luke and that the divergence in viewpoints is a unique literary feature to be celebrated rather than a problem to be solved. Nadella interprets selected Lukan passages in light of Bakhtinian concepts such as dialogism, loophole, and exotopy to show that the disparate perspectives, and interplay between them, display Luke’s superior literary skills rather than his inability to produce a coherent work. Luke emerges as a work akin to Dostoevsky’s Brothers Karamazov that accommodates competing views on several issues and allows them to enter into an unfinalizable dialogue as equal partners.

Raj Nadella is an assistant professor of religion at Adrian College in Michigan.

Luke’s Demonstration to Theophilus: The Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles According to Codex Bezae

  • Authors: Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Josep Rius-Camps
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 720

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This is the first complete English translation of Luke’s Demonstration to Theophilus (the books of Luke and Acts) as found in Codex Bezae. Codex Bezae is a bilingual fourth-century Greek-Latin manuscript. In the past it has been viewed as a marginal manuscript witness. However, the pioneering work of Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Josep Rius-Camps has brought the variant readings in this fascinating document to the fore. Their work argues that, far from being a late revision, Codex Bezae can be seen as one of the oldest versions of Luke’s work in existence. This book presents the two texts unified in one volume, as Luke intended them, for the first time in any published edition. After an introduction explaining the importance of the Bezan text, as well as providing observations about its variances from other manuscripts, a meticulous and continuous Greek transcript is presented together with the English translation on facing pages. This will prove an indispensable reference tool for scholars of Luke-Acts.

This book is a welcome showcase displaying and demonstrating the distinctive text of Luke and Acts in the bi-lingual (Greek-Latin) manuscript, Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis. The contiguity of the Lukan Doppelwerk here emphasizes the coherence in language, structure, rhetorical style, and theological intentions in these two writings. The accompanying translation into English stays as close as practicable to the Greek and itself is a long-overdue rendering of two of the books in this ancient codex.

—J. K. Elliott, professor of New Testament textual criticism, University of Leeds

Rius-Camps and Read-Heimerdinger have combined efforts in yet another significant work on Codex Bezae. This large volume, although primarily an English translation of the Greek text of Luke-Acts, includes extensive linguistic, historical, and textual notes. Students of the New Testament should welcome the accessibility of the text of Cantabrigiensis; it promises to revive interest in that ancient and unusual manuscript. Thanks to Rius-Camps and Read-Heimerdinger for making such a substantive contribution to biblical studies!

—Daniel B. Wallace, executive director, Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts

Jenny Read-Heimerdinger is a research fellow at the University of Wales and lectures in universities worldwide.

Josep Rius-Camps is a priest of the Diocese of Barcelona and is emeritus professor and research fellow at the Facultat de Teologia de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain.

Prayer and Vindication in Luke-Acts: The Theme of Prayer within the Context of the Legitimating and Edifying Objective of the Lukan Narrative

  • Authors: Geir O. Holmås
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This is a comprehensive study of the literary function of prayer in Luke-Acts, employing narrative critical methodology and focusing on the theme’s relation to Luke’s historiographical aims, Holmås argues that the distribution of strategically placed prayer notices and prayers throughout Luke-Acts serves a twofold purpose. First, it is integral to Luke’s project of authenticating the Jesus-movement as accredited by Israel’s God. Holmås shows that Luke presents a consistent pattern of divine affirmation and redemption attending the tenacious prayers of the faithful ones throughout every major phase of his narrative—in turn demonstrating continuity with the pious Israel of the past. Secondly, the ultimate purpose of Luke’s emphasis on prayer is didactic. In Luke’s Gospel, Jesus summons his disciples (and implicitly his readers) to confident and persistent prayer before the Eschaton, assuring them of God’s readiness to answer their entreaties. Luke’s historical account as a whole provides narrative reinforcement of this affirmation. Just as God has been consistent in responding to the diligent prayers of his faithful ones in recent history, satisfying and fulfilling Israel’s hopes for redemption in the Jesus movement, he will assuredly secure ultimate vindication at the end of time for those who persist in prayer.

Holmås’ work is particularly noteworthy for its analysis of German scholarship. This volume will ably familiarize many non-German readers with the significant body of German literature on the topic . . . the volume is the new ‘must read’ for people interested in prayer in Luke-Acts.

Thomas E. Phillips, professor of New Testament and Early Christianity, Point Loma Nazarene University

Geir Otto Holmås is associate professor of New Testament at MF Norwegian School of Theology in Oslo, Norway. His recent publications include articles on narrative-critical methodology and theological hermeneutics.

The Spirit and the ‘Other’: Social Identity, Ethnicity, and Intergroup Reconciliation in Luke-Acts

  • Author: Aaron Kuecker
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 296

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Kuecker uses an artillery of social identity theory to demonstrate that, in Luke’s narrative, the Spirit is the central figure in the formation of a new social identity. Kuecker provides extended exegetical treatments of Luke 1–4 and Acts 1–15. He shows that Luke 1–4 establishes a foundation for Luke’s understanding of the relationship between human identity, the Spirit, and the “other”—especially as it relates to the distribution of in-group benefits beyond group boundaries. With regard to Acts 1–15, Kuecker shows that the Spirit acts whenever human identity is in question in order to transform communities and individuals via the formation of a new social identity.

Kuecker argues that Luke depicts this Spirit-formed social identity as a different way of being human in community, relative to the normative identity processes of other groups in his narrative. This transformed identity produces profound expressions of interethnic reconciliation in Luke-Acts expressed through reformed economic practice, impressive intergroup hospitality, and a reoriented use of ethnic language.

Aaron Kuecker is associate professor of theology at Trinity Christian College. He is an ordained minister in the Reformed Church in America and earned his PhD at St. Mary’s College, University of St. Andrews.

How to Kill Things with Words: Ananias and Sapphira under the Prophetic Speech-Act of Divine Judgment (Acts 4:32–5:11)

  • Author: David R. McCabe
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 296

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This work examines the dynamics of the Ananias and Sapphira episode in Acts and its role in the narrative of Luke-Acts. McCabe locates the passage within its literary context, and emphasizes the manner in which it is embedded in a discourse on the life of the Christian community expressed through shared goods.

Utilizing speech-act theory, McCabe argues that Peter’s words, divinely sanctioned, directly execute the divine judgment upon the couple. This is argued by appealing to the social processes and conventions of language-use within the context of a “community-of-goods” discourse as present in the Lukan narrative. McCabe appeals to the conventions deployed in the narrative world of Luke-Acts which undergird the efficacy of prophetic speech to effect divine judgment. These including the patterns established by prophetic figures in the Scriptures of Israel and Luke’s own characterization of Jesus as Prophet-King, followed by an examination of Luke’s characterization of Peter as an apostolic-prophetic successor to Jesus, deputized to speak on behalf of God. McCabe concludes by examining the successful execution of the speech-act of divine judgment.

David R. McCabe is assistant professor of New Testament at Bethel College, Indiana.

Reading Acts Today

  • Editors: Steve Walton, Thomas E. Phillips, Lloyd Keith Pietersen, and F. Scott Spencer
  • Series: Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Reading Acts Today provides a “state of the art” view of the study of Acts from a variety of perspectives and approaches. It is a fresh and stimulating collection of scholarly essays at the cutting edge of the discipline. The contributions approach Acts from many different angles including historical, theological, socio-economic, literary, narrative, and exegetical approaches. This enables a thorough examination of the way that other ancient writings illuminate Acts and locates the book in its ancient context.

The wide range of contributors features some of the most influential names in modern New Testament studies, providing a remarkable assessment of current scholarship on the book of Acts. These include James D. G. Dunn, I. Howard Marshall, and Richard Burridge.

Steve Walton is senior lecturer in Greek and New Testament studies and director of research at the London School of Theology.

Thomas E. Phillips is professor of New Testament and Early Christian Studies at Point Loma Nazarene University.

Lloyd Keith Pietersen received his PhD from the University of Sheffield and is senior lecturer and research coordinator in New Testament studies for the University of Gloucestershire.

F. Scott Spencer is professor of New Testament at Baptist Theological Seminary in Richmond, Virginia. He is the author of The Portrait of Philip in Acts: A Study of Roles and Relations. He is the chair of the New Testament section for the Southeastern Commission for the Study of Religion.

John’s Gospel and Intimations of Apocalyptic

  • Editors: Catrin H. Williams and Christopher C. Rowland
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 304

John’s Gospel has traditionally been regarded as the least apocalyptic document in the New Testament. This exciting new collection of essays redresses the balance by exploring the ways in which the apocalyptic literature of Second Temple Judaism has contributed to the theology and outlook of John’s Gospel.

Given that John, like the Jewish apocalyptic texts, is primarily concerned with the theme of revelation, the contributors examine how apocalyptic ideas can help to explain the Johannine portrayal of Jesus as the messenger sent from heaven to reveal the divine mysteries, as well as the Gospel’s presentation of the activity of the Spirit, its understanding of evil, and the intended effects of this “apocalypse in reverse” on its readers and hearers. The highly distinguished contributors include John Ashton, Christopher Rowland, April DeConick, Judith Lieu, and Jorg Frey.

Catrin H. Williams is senior lecturer in New Testament studies at the University of Wales

Christopher C. Rowland is professor of the exegesis of Holy Scripture at Queen’s College, Oxford.

Christology in the Synoptic Gospels: God or God’s Servant

  • Author: Sigurd Grindheim
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 232

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

When Mark, Matthew, and Luke decided to give a written account of Jesus Christ, they were faced with a formidable challenge. How could they tell the story of the man who spoke and acted like God? They used several titles, such as “prophet,” “Messiah,” “Son of God,” “Son of Man,” “Servant of the Lord,” and even “Lord” itself. But none of these really did justice to the person of Jesus. Through a carefully crafted narrative, the Synoptic evangelists painted pictures of Jesus that went beyond all of Israel’s expectations and showed a man who was God’s humble, suffering servant and at the same time God’s equal.

Sigurd Grindheim shows how the Synoptic Evangelists reinterpreted Israel’s hopes in light of the Jesus story. He shows how they went beyond Old Testament and Jewish material regarding the Messiah, drawing heavily upon the expectations of God’s own intervention in history. The result is a picture of Jesus who fulfills all of Israel’s hopes, not only those relating to God’s eschatological agent, but also those pertaining to God himself.

This book is an ideal choice for serious students of the Gospels or the life of Jesus. It is well organized, clearly written, and easily intelligible without being simplistic. Dr. Grindheim is abreast of the latest scholarship and interacts with it appreciatively, but takes his own carefully argued approach to the presentation in the Synoptic Gospels of Jesus’ relationship to God. The result is a book that introduces students to the basic issues in the field, and, at the same time, provides interesting and thought-provoking reading.

Frank Thielman, professor of divinity, Beeson Divinity School

In this exceptionally rich, informative, and rewarding study, Sigurd Grindheim explores the Christology of the Synoptic Gospels by first focusing on contemporary Jewish eschatological expectations. This sets the stage for the study of the individual Synoptics with a focus on their distinctive Christologies. The whole discussion is set fully in the first-century theological context by frequent reference to non-canonical literature. An ideal textbook for courses on the Synoptic Gospels.

Donald A. Hagner, George Eldon Ladd Professor Emeritus of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary

In this careful work, Dr. Grindheim has provided a refreshing study on the relationship between Christ and God the Father. Paying close attention to both the historical background of the various Christological titles as well as the narrative contexts in which they are situated, he has demonstrated how the Christological confessions articulated in the Nicene Creed find their roots in the earliest Gospel witnesses. This will serve as a clear, informed, and reliable guide for those entering the field of New Testament Christology.

—David W. Pao, chair of the New Testament department, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

Sigurd Grindheim teaches New Testament at Fjellhaug International University College, Norway.

Product Details

  • Title: T&T Clark Studies in the Gospels and Acts (18 vols.)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 18
  • Pages: 5,016