Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PDT
Local: 6:18 AM

Sign in

  1. Forgot your password?
What's Pre-Pub?
Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
Your Price
$219.95
15% OFF
Reg.: $259.95
Gathering Interest
T&T Clark Studies in Modern Theology (16 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.

Overview

The T&T Clark Biblical Studies collection is an invaluable resource for your study of classic Christian theology and its implications for the modern church. These volumes highlight and analyze important works by key authors and theologians—John Calvin, Eberhard Jüngel, Jonathan Edwards, and others. You’ll find thorough examinations of Christian theology from the original viewpoint of classic authors alongside critical analyses from postmodern perspectives. This collection has everything you need to study hermeneutics, amillenialism, postmodern theology, and their ramifications for the modern church.

With the Logos edition, the T&T Clark Biblical Studies collection integrates seamlessly into your digital library. Use powerful features to search your entire library by topic or Scripture reference. See Scripture references in your preferred Bible translation on mouseover. Save time in your research by using the Passage guide to quickly find additional commentaries and biographies. You’ll prepare sermons faster with the Sermon Starter Guide, which links English words to their original Greek or Hebrew, finds quotes and illustrations, and even accesses suggested preaching outlines.

Key Features

  • In-depth study of classic Christian theology and its implications for the modern church
  • Numerous analyses by key theological leaders from the last 500 years
  • Selected works from the Guides for the Perplexed series
  • Selected works from the T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology series

Individual Titles

Schleiermacher: A Guide for the Perplexed

  • Author: Theodore Vial
  • Series: Guides for the Perplexed
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 176

Friedrich Daniel Ernst Schleiermacher, also known as the “Father of Modern Theology," is among Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, and Karl Barth as one of the first Christian systematic theologians; however, his influence extends far beyond theology. He was a pioneer in education, the philosophy of language, and hermeneutics. This Guide for the Perplexed brings the results of the recent decades of research to bear on the most controversial and important aspects of Schleiermacher’s work for our own time. You will find that his way of exploring many theological issues are still quite relevant.

Theodore Vial is assistant professor of Theology at the Iliff School of Theology in Denver, Colorado.

Postliberal Theology: A Guide for the Perplexed

  • Author: Ronald T. Michener
  • Series: Guides for the Perplexed
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Postliberal theology is a movement in contemporary theology that rejects both the enlightenment appeal to a “universal rationality" and the liberal assumption of an immediate religious experience common to all humanity. The movement initially began in the 1980’s with its association to Yale Divinity School. Key theologians in the movement such as Hans Frei, Paul Holmer, David Kelsey, and George Lindbeck were significantly influenced the thinking of Karl Barth, Clifford Geertz, and Ludwig Wittgenstein. Postliberalism uses a narrative approach to theology and argues that all thought and experience is historically and socially mediated.

Michener provides the reader with an accessible introductory overview of the origins, current thought, potential problems, and future possibilities of postliberal theology. The basic philosophical and theological backgrounds are briefly discussed, and the seminal and predominant theologians identified within the movement. Michener shows how postliberalism emerges from the context of the postmodern critique of enlightenment rationalism and empiricism, and is extremely critical of classical liberal theology, rather than an advancement of its agenda.

Ronald T. Michener is associate professor of Systematic Theology and chair of the department of Systematic Theology Evangelische Theologische Faculteit in Leuven, Belgium.

Law and Gospel in Emil Brunner’s Earlier Dialectical Theology

  • Author: David A. Gilland
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 224

The Swiss Reformed Theologian, Emil Brunner, was one of the key figures in the early twentieth-century theological movement of Dialectical Theology. In this monograph, David Gilland offers an account of Bruner’s earlier theology in relation to one of the central themes of the Protestant Reformation: Law and Gospel. He examines Brunner’s early relationship with fellow Swiss Reformed theologian, Karl Barth, and provides a detailed reading of a variety of Brunner’s essays from the early the 1920s, centering on Brunner’s efforts to use the Law-Gospel relationship to establish a basis for Christian theology. After analyzing the influence this has on Brunner’s theological method, Gilland examines Brunner’s earliest text on Christology, The Mediator, and provides a careful reading of Brunner’s controversial polemic against Karl Barth’s, Nature and Grace. The book concludes with reflections on Brunner’s earlier theological work and his turbulent relationship with Karl Barth.

David A. Gilland earned his MTS from Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC and a PhD in Systematic Theology from the University of Aberdeen, UK. He currently teaches at Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany.

The Interruptive Word: Eberhard Jüngel on the Sacramental Structure of God’s Relation to the World

  • Author: R. David Nelson
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 272

While German Lutheran theologian Eberhard Jüngel has made a number of significant contributions to contemporaneous discussions of sacramental theology, this topic has largely been ignored by interpreters of his thought. This study summarizes and evaluates, through a close reading of primary and secondary source materials, Jüngel’s approach to the problem of sacrament. Nelson considers Jüngel’s claim that the Word of God functions sacramentally as it addresses its hearer, and analyzes his assertion that Jesus Christ is the unique and preeminent sacrament of God for the world. Progressing to an exploration of Jüngel’s ecclesiology, Nelson reveals Jüngel’s interesting approach to the question of the church’s sacramentality. The volume concludes with an investigation into Jüngel’s doctrines of baptism and the Lord’s Supper.

R. David Nelson is acquisitions editor at Baker Academic and Brazos Press, and teaches biblical studies and theology at Cornerstone University, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Hallowed Be Thy Name: The Sanctification of All in the Soteriology of P. T. Forsyth

  • Author: Jason Goroncy
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book fills a noticeable gap in the Peter Taylor Forsyth studies. It provides readers interested in the thought of Forsyth with a way of reading and critiquing his corpus, and the theological, philosophical, and historical locale of his thought. Goroncy explores whether the notion of “hallowing" provides a profitable lens through which to read and evaluate Forsyth’s soteriology. He suggests that the hallowing of God’s name is, for Forsyth, the way whereby God both justifies himself and claims creation for divine service. This book proposes that reading Forsyth’s corpus as essentially an exposition of the first petition of the Lord’s Prayer is an invitation to better comprehend not only his soteriology but also his broader theological vision and interests.

In this fine book, Jason Goroncy engages in a critical and appreciative assessment of the theological work of P. T. Forsyth by directing our attention to the ways in which Forsyth understands divine action in terms of the Lord’s prayer’s first petition. This focus serves well the task of exploring the richness of Forsyth’s work. Goroncy’s beautifully crafted prose and astute theological judgment combine in a compelling case that Forsyth deserves to be reckoned with still.

—Murray Rae, head of the department of theology, University of Otago, New Zealand

Jason Goroncy earned his PhD from St. Andrews in Scotland and is lecturer and dean of studies at the Knox Centre for Ministry and Leadership in Dunedin, New Zealand.

The Kenotic Trajectory of the Church in Donald MacKinnon’s Theology: From Galilee to Jerusalem to Galilee

  • Author: Timothy G. Connor
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This book explores those aspects of Donald MacKinnon’s theological writings which challenge the claim of the liberal Catholic tradition in the Church of England to have forged an ecclesiological consensus, namely that the church is the extension of the incarnation. MacKinnon destabilized this claim by exposing the wide gulf between theory and practice in that church, especially in his own Anglo-Catholic tradition within it. For him, the collapse of Christendom is the occasion for a dialectical reconstruction of the relation of the hurch to Jesus Christ, and to the world, on the basis of the Gospel. His basic claim is that authentic ecclesial existence must correspond with what was revealed and effected by Jesus along his way from Galilee to Jerusalem and back.

Donald Mackinnon’s theology defies easy stereotyping. He was an Anglo-Catholic who summoned the church to humility, a student of Barth and yet no "Barthian," a philosopher’s philosopher marked by penetrating insight into the Christian Gospel. In this remarkable study, Timothy Connor shows how all these lines converge in Mackinnon’s reflections on the self-emptying of the crucified. A beautiful and engaging work of scholarship.

Joseph Mangina, Professor of Theology, Wycliffe College, Toronto, Canada

Timothy G. Connor is an archdeacon in the Diocese of Huron and rector of St. George's Anglican Church, Canada. He is also adjunct lecturer of systematic theology at Wycliffe College, Ontario.

Faithful to Save: Pannenberg on God’s Reconciling Action

  • Author: Kent Eilers
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Faithful to Save is an exposition and analysis of Wolfhart Pannenberg’s doctrine of reconciliation as it appears in his three-volume Systematic Theology. It suggests that this doctrine is best approached by bearing in mind its three most salient characteristics, all of which are interdependent, and when kept in view make the essential tenets of Pannenberg’s account transparent. On the basis of a detailed examination of the central texts, it argues that Pannenberg’s doctrine of reconciliation at once marks out God’s action in the world as the true infinite and also issues an invitation to consider how such a God extends himself in reconciling love to his creatures.

In this careful exploration of the central place and comprehensive character of the doctrine of reconciliation in Pannenberg’s mature theology, Eilers displays the complexity, subtlety, and integrity of the work of one of Europe’s most significant living theologians. Students of contemporary Christian doctrine will learn much from Eilers’ generous study which insightfully places Pannenberg’s achievement into dialogue with current and pressing debates concerning soteriology, the doctrine of God and the relation between them.

Philip Ziegler, lecturer, University of Aberdeen

Kent Eilers earned his PhD from King’s College, Aberdeen and is assistant professor of theology at Huntington University.

Jonathan Edwards’s Theology: A Reinterpretation

  • Author: Kyle C. Strobel
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This volume provides an interpretative key to Jonathan Edwards’ theology. Strobel offers a dogmatic exposition of Edwards’ theology by unveiling the Trinitarian architecture of his thought. Building upon this analysis, Strobel applies his construct to reinterpret three key areas of redemption debated widely in the secondary literature—spiritual knowledge, regeneration, and religious affection. Strobel applies a theological approach rather than philosophical, employing Edwards’ self-confession as a Reformed theologian to guide his analysis. In advancing a theological reading of Edwards, Strobel focuses on the systematic nature of Edwards’ theology, ordering it according to his doctrinal affirmations. This necessitates, as many Edwards scholars now affirm, a primary focus on Edwards’ Trinitarian theology, where the Trinity serves as the key ontological principle which orders the whole of his doctrinal construction.

Kyle C. Strobel earned his PhD at King’s College, University of Aberdeen, Scotland.

Trinity, Freedom and Love: An Engagement with the Theology of Eberhard Jüngel

  • Author: Piotr Malysz
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

By critically engaging Eberhard Jüngel’s doctrine of the Trinity, this volume makes a broader, constructive contribution to contemporary Trinitarian thought. The argument centers on the question—posed by the inconsistencies uncovered in Jüngel’s doctrine of God—of how one can assert both divine freedom and the intersubjectivity of God’s Trinitarian self-determination. Malysz suggests that a resolution to this problem lies in a logic of divine freedom, which, next to the Trinitarian logic of love, constitutes a different and simultaneous mode of Trinitarian relationality. To develop this logic, Malysz draws on Jüngel’s understanding of human freedom as rooted in the “elemental interruption" of the self-securing subject. Thus Malysz not only brings Jüngel’s view of divine freedom into correspondence with the anthropological effects that Jüngel ascribes to it, but above all, offers an imaginative new way of closely integrating the doctrine of God and theological anthropology.

Piotr Malysz is assistant professor of divinity at Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama.

Trinity and Organism: Towards a New Reading of Herman Bavinck’s Organic Motif

  • Author: James Eglinton
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This book explores the organic motif found throughout the writings of the Dutch Calvinist theologian Herman Bavinck. By examining the sense in which Bavinck views all of reality as a beautiful balance of unity-in-diversity, James Eglinton draws the reader to Bavinck’s constant concern for the doctrine of God as Trinity. If God is the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, Bavinck argues the creation must be more akin to an organism than a machine. Trinity and organism are thus closely linked concepts. Eglinton critiques and rejects the “two Bavincks" (one orthodox and the other modern) hermeneutic so commonplace in discussions of Bavinck’s theology. Instead, this book argues for a reunited Herman Bavinck as a figure committed to the participation of historic orthodox theology in the modern world.

Herman Bavinck must rank as one of the most creative modern interpreters of the Calvinist tradition. James Eglinton matches this creative capacity with a bold and persuasive new reading of Bavinck’s doctrine of God, showing how a critical deployment of nineteenth-century organic thought enabled the theologian to produce a Trinitarian vision of the unity in particularity of all creation.

George Newlands, professor of theology, University of Glasgow

James Eglinton is a postdoctoral research fellow at Kampen Theological University in the Netherlands. His current postdoctoral research concerns the relationship between Scottish and Dutch Calvinism.

God Is a Communicative Being: Divine Communicativeness and Harmony in the Theology of Jonathan Edwards

  • Author: William M. Schweitzer
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Over the past half-century, there has been a proliferation of scholarship on the great American theologian Jonathan Edwards. However, the vast majority of this output confines itself to the details of his work. In this groundbreaking study, William Schweitzer presents a new reading of Edwards; he starts with the question, what is distinctive in Edwards' theology? The answer comes in Edwards' insight into Trinitarian life. God is eternally communicative of his knowledge, love, and joy among the three persons of the Trinity, and this divine communicativeness was for Edwards the explanation for why God created the universe. More specifically, however, Edwards believed that God's communication carries with it the Trinitarian hallmark of “harmony." Edwards' lifelong project—as demonstrated by the common purpose of all three unfinished “Great Works"—was to interpret the harmony found in and among the several media of revelation.

Rigorously researched and lucidly written, this work highlights the unique combination of orthodoxy and originality which characterized the mind of Jonathan Edwards. It is immensely stimulating, and I hope it will prove a seminal work, encouraging further development of the core idea that God by his very nature communicates himself; and in doing so shares not only his knowledge and ideas, but also the love and joy which lie at the heart of his own Trinitarian life.

Donald Macleod, Free Church of Scotland College, UK.

William M. Schweitzer earned his PhD from Edinburgh University and is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church of America. He serves as the church planting minister of Gateshead Presbyterian Church in Northern England.

Pneumatology and Theology of the Cross in the Preaching of Christoph Friedrich Blumhardt: The Holy Spirit between Wittenberg and Azusa Street

  • Author: Simeon Zahl
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 224

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

This book identifies the impasse between classical Protestant and contemporary charismatic and Pentecostal pneumatologies as a fundamental theological problem. Its goal is to contribute a constructive proposal for moving beyond this impasse, based on the theology of Christoph Friedrich Blumhardt. The disagreement is over the question of unmediated experience of the Holy Spirit. In relation to classical Protestantism, the primary theological distinction of charismatic theology is its strong affirmation of unmediated experience of the Spirit in Christian life and worship. Christoph Blumhardt’s theology, which integrates pessimistic anthropology and unmediated experience, is well-suited to exploring the impasse between the two theological traditions.

Can a bridge be found between classical Protestantism and charismatic Pentecostalism, the most significant Christian movement in recent decades? Simeon Zahl persuasively argues Christoph Blumhardt’s charismatic theology of the cross provides just such a bridge. An important book on a central and unresolved problem.

Misolav Volf, Henry B. Wright Professor of Theology, Yale University

Simeon Zahl studied at Harvard University and earned his PhD from the University of Cambridge. He is currently an affiliated lecturer in the faculty of divinity at the University of Cambridge, UK.

Isaak A. Dorner: The Triune God and the Gospel of Salvation

  • Author: Jonathan Norgate
  • Series: T&T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 244

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Norgate assesses the way in which the Christian doctrine of the Trinity is the foundation for all other Christian doctrines, especially the Christian understanding of salvation. He investigates in detail the approach of the German Lutheran theologian, Isaac A. Dorner to this question. Analysis of his arguments concerning the priority of the doctrine of God for Christian belief and dogmatics is given. Norgate examines the form of his doctrine of God’s trinity, and gives an extensive study of how Dorner’s particular account of God’s triune identity informs the Christian conception of God’s relation to the world, first as Creator and second as Savior. In this process, it seeks to refocus attention on Dorner as a major figure in the development of modern theology. The relationship between Dorner’s doctrines of the triune God and salvation is assessed. Dorner’s positive reconstruction of the Christian idea of God as Trinity provides helpful resources in delineating a non-competitive account of God’s relation to the world. This means that God is not confused with nor distant from the world. The eternal vitality of God’s immanent personality is the basis of his vital economic activity, which culminates in the incarnation of the Son. Norgate concludes by comparing Dorner’s achievements with those found in more recent theologies of atonement.

This is an impressive study—Norgate deftly explores what is very complex conceptual terrain to offer a greatly insightful analysis of the dogmatic architecture of I. A. Dorner’s System of Christian Doctrine. He lucidly demonstrates the central role that the ideas of divine aseity and the ‘absolute and ethical personality’ of the triune God play in shaping the doctrines of creation, Christology, salvation with the System, while scrutinizing with care the implications of Dorner’s apologetic aims and ’supralapsarian’ logic. There is much to learn here not only about Dorner’s own theological achievement, but also about the very task and shape of Christian theology itself.

Philip Ziegler, lecturer, University of Aberdeen

Jonathan Norgate studied English literature and theology at King’s College, Cambridge, and Systematic Theology at King’s College, London, and the University of Aberdeen. He is currently on staff at Christ Church, Fulwood in Sheffield, UK.

The Trinitarian Theology of Stanley J. Grenz

  • Author: Jason S. Sexton
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 256

Exploring one of the most important and controversial figures in recent evangelical theology, this book provides an exhaustive examination of the core elements of Stanley Grenz’s work. Amidst the critique that Grenz received during his lifetime, Jason Sexton locates the categorical aims for his re-imagining of evangelical theology as overtly Trinitarian. The book uncovers the impact of the theology of Wolfhart Pannenberg, his doctoral supervisor, upon his thought, and chronicles the development of a Trinitarian methodology. Consideration is also given to how Grenz’s depiction of the Trinity in the Imago Dei concept shaped his reading of Scripture. By examining how Grenz’s Trinitarian perspective informed his theology and theological ethics, Sexton ultimately concludes that Grenz was not only a deeply conservative and thoroughly Trinitarian evangelical theologian, but that he was also arguably the premier evangelical theologian of his generation.

Jason S. Sexton earned his PhD at the University of St. Andrews. He was a visiting scholar and teacher at Ridley Hall, Cambridge.

Bultmann Unlocked

  • Author: Tim Labron
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 144

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

The unique character of Rudolf Bultmann’s thought has been missed by many traditional studies that cast him in exegetical or hermeneutic frameworks. His methods of source criticism and his concept of “demythologizing" have led some to reject his thought in total, others to label him as a subjectivist. Tim Labron steps out of such traditional studies by reading Bultmann as a unique scholar and leading to the keys that unlock the distinct character of Bultmann’s thought—John 1:14 and the principle of justification by faith. Bultmann uses them in a parallel function to burn the traditional subject-object hierarchies and self-made foundations to the ground. Labron shows the implications this had for theology, religious studies, and philosophy.

Labron notes that the work of Bultmann has fallen into obscurity. If his work is mentioned these days, its fate is a dismissive nod consigning it to the dustbins of the past. Labron rightly argues that this situation is unjustifiable, a consequence of a failure to grasp the import of Bultmann’s work. That failure is rooted in misunderstanding, which Karl Barth noted, was common among Bultmann’s contemporary critics. Nothing has changed. The aim of his book is to unlock Bultmann’s thought from obscurity and the prison of dismissive misunderstanding. He does not seek to gain uncritical acceptance of Bultmann’s thought, but to reveal what Bultmann called the actual scandal of the Gospel. Using his own work on Wittgenstein and post-structuralism he sets out to show that Bultmann’s existentialism is actually opposed to Cartesian thought, thus requiring reassessment.

John Painter, Charles Sturt University, Australia.

Tim Labron is associate professor of religious studies at Concordia University College of Alberta, Canada.

The Theology of Colin Gunton

  • Author: Lincoln Harvey
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

A reissue of a brilliant and accessible introduction to Trinitarian thought. Colin Gunton argues that the theology of the Trinity has profound implications for all dimensions of human life. Central to his work is his argument that the doctrine should offer ways of articulating the being of God and of the world so that we may be better able to live before God and with each other.

Lincoln Harvey is tutor in theology at St. Mellitus College in London. He was previously tutor for Christian doctrine at The South East Institute for Theological Education (SEITE). He is ordained in the Church of England, serving his curacy at St. John-at-Hackney. He was one of Colin Gunton’s last research students.

Product Details

  • Title: T&T Clark Studies in Modern Theology
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Volumes: 16
  • Pages: 3,780