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Walter Brueggemann Collection (24 vols.)

by Brueggemann, Walter

Fortress Press 1984–2012

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Walter Brueggemann Collection (24 vols.)
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Overview

Known as one of America’s best theologians and one of the world’s foremost scholars on the Old Testament, Walter Brueggemann has inspired young scholars and students and driven the discourse on theology with some of the biggest players in contemporary Bible scholarship. This collection contains some of his most influential and inspiring works, his most personal thoughts on Scripture and faith, and his deepest musings on Old Testament culture.

With the Logos Bible Software edition, you can journey through this collection with today’s most advanced tools for reading and studying God’s Word. All Scripture passages are linked to your library’s original language texts and English translations. Enhance your study with Logos’ advanced features—search by topic to find out what Brueggemann teaches on the Exodus, or find every mention of “Psalm 91” throughout his works.

Looking for Walter Brueggemann’s Theology of the Old Testament? You’ll find it here!

Key Features

  • Provides essential Old Testament scholarship from one of the most prominent living scholars
  • Contains clear and deep insight on theology, history, hermeneutics, ancient sociology, and Scripture
  • Includes material perfect for pastors, professors, counselors, and Old Testament scholars

Individual Titles

The Practice of Prophetic Imagination

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Walter Brueggemann declares that the necessary character of truly prophetic preaching today is “a contestation between narratives.” If the dominant narrative of our time promotes national self-sufficiency (through militarism) and personal self-sufficiency (through consumerism), it must be opposed by a different narrative. Prophetic preaching takes its stand in a world claimed by a God who is gracious, uncompromising—and real. Brueggemann writes here for leaders in faith communities who bear the responsibility of preaching. He describes the discipline of a prophetic imagination, in an unflinchingly realistic, unwaveringly candid manner.

Walter Brueggemann’s early work on prophecy and imagination has become foundational for a whole generation of preachers and scholars, including me. Here he returns to perhaps the most characteristic of all his myriad ventures, with unaltered vigor and razor-sharp edge. Prophets are not just provocateurs: they are those who profoundly love their people, deeply know their tradition, and can’t but speak of what they both love and know. Brueggemann both loves and knows. That’s what makes him a prophet. Would that we were more like him. Reading this book is a healthy first step.

—Sam Wells, vicar, St. Martin-in-the-Fields, London

Inscribing the Text: Sermons and Prayers of Walter Brueggemann

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This volume contains Walter Brueggemann’s most recent public sermons and prayers. With captivating and convicting messages for this rebellious age, Brueggemann nourishes the Christian spirit and challenges the fickle heart. With the deep theological scholarship one would expect of Brueggemann, and the surprising passion and dynamism of a youthful spirit, Inscribing the Text is full of the insight and passion readers are desperate to hear.

In this wonderful collection of sermons and prayers, we are privileged to hear [Brueggemann] fight with, be surprised by, playfully delight in, and finally be subdued by Scripture. And when he gets down and dirty in prayer, what a conversation to overhear!

William H. Willimon, dean of the chapel and professor of Christian ministry, Duke University

Walter Brueggemann, exegete, hermeneutist, contemporary prophet, priest, and preacher, has for decades shared rich insights about the meaning of the biblical text. Now we can sample his challenging sermons, which show us how to speak truth to power and profound hope to all. Our preaching will be clearer, more honest, and more fruitful as we are tutored by his homiletic genius and prophetic zeal.

—James A. Forbes Jr., senior minister, Riverside Church, NY

Inscribing the Text unveils a surprising new model for preaching, that of the preacher-scribe, who discovers the power in the text, releases it, and then gets out of its way. Brueggemann’s sermons bristle with the man who preaches them. More importantly, they let the Scripture speak with authority. This is vintage Brueggemann.

—Richard Lischer, James T. and Alice Mead Cleland Professor of Preaching, Duke Divinity School

Like Fire in the Bones: Listening for the Prophetic Word in Jeremiah

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Preaching out of the book of Jeremiah presents natural problems and difficulties to pastors and ministers alike. Despite being one of the largest books in the Bible, Jeremiah is often overlooked in sermons and teaching. Taking on the task of making this challenging book more accessible to pastors and preachers, Walter Brueggemann discusses each aspect of Jeremiah as source material for prophetic teaching.

Like Fire in the Bones is a gift to the churches and to anyone interested in prophetic literature with its harsh rhetoric, blazing visions, and demanding yet merciful God. Jeremiah may have had fire in his bones, but Brueggemann sets fires with his pen. He shows how Jeremiah speaks into the abyss of historical catastrophe with speech that matches experience. He underlines the disputatious political character of theological speech. He reiterates Jeremiah’s call to covenant loyalty even in the face of religious and government forces that suppress and silence words of life. He illuminates Jeremiah’s bare-boned hope for a world in the thrall of empire and social amnesia. If ever there was need for imaginative rereading of Jeremiah and of the texts of common life, it is now. At this, Brueggemann is a master.

Kathleen M. O’Connor, William Marcellus McPheeters Professor of Old Testament, Columbia Theological Seminary

Jeremiah, the longest book in the Bible, is neglected much too often by preacher and teacher alike. That neglect is due, in significant part, to the prophet’s often-sharp words that strike too close to home, in his own generation and in ours. It is telling that the prophet Jeremiah, the focus of these essays that span much of Walter Brueggemann’s prophetic ministry, has been in his head and heart for such a long time. Again and again, Brueggemann’s own words have mirrored Jeremiah to us, and the times in which we presently live could profit from hearing them again.

Terence E. Fretheim, Elva B. Lovell Professor of Old Testament, Luther Seminary

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

The Word that Redescribes the World: The Bible and Discipleship

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

In the last several years, Walter Brueggemann’s writings have directly addressed the situation of Christian communities in today’s globalized context, with its consumerist lifestyles, vast inequalities, and near-imperial exercises of power. His insights, forged in rugged encounters with the texts of the Old Testament, are sharp, painful, and indispensable. In the people of Israel Brueggemann finds a model of an alternative community—anchored in YHWH, ever exploring new possibilities, and prophetically bent against empire.

Readers cannot come away from these essays unchallenged or unchanged. The ethic of resistance and engagement that Brueggemann puts forth demands a response equally vigorous and passionate. In that sense, he finds himself in the company of the prophets that the Old Testament scholar so highly esteems.

—Craig Stephans, author, Shakespeare on Spirituality: Life-Changing Wisdom from Shakespeare’s Plays

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

The Book that Breathes New Life: Scriptural Authority and Biblical Theology

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 252

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Walter Brueggemann, in this collection of essays, engages with the Old Testament in a profound and significant way: discussing its authority, its theology, and its challenges and charm. These essays are a cornerstone in Old Testament theological exegesis, bringing key theological concepts to terms with the Old Testament and the God behind it all.

Walter Brueggemann, one of the most brilliant speakers, writers, and thinkers in Old Testament theology, again has a collection of his articles edited, this time on his most favorite subject, the authority and theology of the Bible. . . . 13 essays engage in the details and developments of the field. They are mining trenches in a fertile territory, and the miner does come up with so many surprising discoveries: Walter Brueggemann at his best.

Erhard S. Gerstenberger, emeritus professor of Old Testament, Marburg University, Germany

For more than a generation readers have regularly benefited from Walter Brueggemann’s lively studies of biblical texts. These essays take a step behind that textual work to muse on issues of biblical authority and to survey the landscape of Old Testament scholarship regarding key critical questions and major theological developments. As always, readers can count on Brueggemann for clear, engaging, and insightful reflections on issues important for both church and academy.

Terence E. Fretheim, Elva B. Lovell Professor of Old Testament, Luther Seminary, St. Paul

The Prophetic Imagination

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Edition: Revised
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 178

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

In this challenging and enlightening treatment, Walter Brueggemann traces the lines from the radical vision of Moses to the solidification of royal power in Solomon to the prophetic critique of that power with a new vision of freedom in the prophets. Here he traces the broad sweep from Exodus to Kings to Jeremiah to Jesus. He highlights that the prophetic vision and not only embraces the pain of the people but creates an energy and amazement based on the new thing that God is doing. In this new edition, Brueggemann has completely revised the text, updated the notes, and added a new preface.

Disruptive Grace: Reflections on God, Scripture, and the Church

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Carolyn J. Sharp
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Walter Brueggemann has been one of the leading voices in Hebrew Bible interpretation for decades. His landmark works in Old Testament theology have inspired and informed a generation of students, scholars, and preachers. These chapters gather his recent never-before-published addresses and essays, drawing from all three parts of the Hebrew Bible—Torah, prophets, and writings—and addressing the role of the Hebrew canon in the life of the church.

Brueggemann turns his critical erudition to those practices—prophecy, lament, prayer, faithful imagination, and a holy economics—that alone may usher in a humane and peaceful future for our cities and our world, in defiance of the most ruthless aspects of capitalism, the arrogance of militarism, and the disciplines of the national security state.

Walter Brueggeman’s Disruptive Grace delivers a provocative and penetrating challenge to the powers and principalities of our contemporary world. This concentrate of ‘grace and truth’ not only exposes these forces of death but with master skill imagines a way out of the morass. One could only hope that the torrent from Brueggemann’s pen never ends . . . for the good of us all! And Carolyn J. Sharp’s exquisite comments and painstaking editorial work are a fitting tribute.

Louis Stulman, professor of religious studies, University of Findlay

Carolyn J. Sharp is associate professor of Hebrew Scriptures at Yale Divinity School.

Awed to Heaven, Rooted in Earth: Prayers of Walter Brueggemann

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Edwin Searcy
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

This thoughtful collection of prayers emerged from Walter Brueggemann’s 35 years of teaching in seminaries. Full of reflection, faith, and dialogue, they reveal another side of this gifted author from what his many readers are accustomed to. These deeply felt and exquisitely articulated prayers reflect a wide range of life experiences. As readers, we are taken from the depths of pain and loss to the heights of joy and praise. The author takes on life in its fullest as he utters his praise and lament, petition and thanksgiving. Brueggemann’s prayers lead us to deeper commitment, deeper faith, and deeper reflection.

The volume also includes an index of biblical allusions that will be useful for preachers as well as the general reader looking for the biblical roots of these fears, hopes, struggles, and aspirations.

Walter Brueggemann, whose thoughtful and reflective works on the Hebrew Bible have ensured that the term ‘Old Testament theologian’ is not an oxymoron, offers distilled wisdom from his 35 years of teaching in Awed to Heaven, Rooted to Earth. At the seminaries where he has taught, professors traditionally open their classes with prayer—a practice that for some might devolve into a quick nod to convention, but Brueggemann has always presented the opportunity to involve students more intimately in the assigned biblical texts. This marvelous little book of Brueggemann’s start-of-class prayers will have readers cheering, especially when he writes that ‘much public prayer in the church is careless and slovenly, and . . . what passes for spontaneity is in fact a lack of preparation.’

Publishers Weekly

Edwin Searcy is pastor of University Hill Congregation in Vancouver, British Columbia.

The Land: Place as Gift, Promise, and Challenge in Biblical Faith

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Series: Overtures to Biblical Theology Series
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

The land was one of the most vibrant symbols for the people of ancient Israel. In the land—gift, promise, and challenge—was found the physical source of Israel’s fertility and life, and a place for the gathering of the hopes of the covenant people. In this careful treatment, Walter Brueggemann follows the development of his theme through the major blocks of Israel’s traditions. The book provides a point of entrance both to the theology of the Old Testament and to aspects of the New Testament—even as it illuminates crucial issues of the contemporary scene. In this fully revised version, Brueggemann provides new insights, as well as updating the discussion, notes, and bibliography.

Here was the story of the Hebrew slaves escaping from the hierarchical dictatorship of Pharaoh’s Egypt to a land where they would not be slaves but landowners. What sort of land would they create? Would it be a society that was just like Egypt but with themselves in charge and some other poor beggars at the bottom? Or, would it be a different sort of society altogether? The thread that runs through it all is: ‘It shall not be for you as it was in Egypt.’ A radical new vision is spelled out for a new society. A vision which included: better ways of treating each other, better ways of using the resources of the land, better understanding of the law and better rules for those in power; all encapsulated in the covenant between God and the people. And yet, in the end, Pharaoh’s way did re-assert itself. The covenant was forgotten leaving the prophets to dream of a new covenant that was to come.

—Graham Cook, retired United Reformed Church minister

David’s Truth: In Israel’s Imagination and Memory

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this completely revised edition of a true classic, Walter Brueggemann thoughtfully examines four different sets of David narratives. Each narrative reflects a particular social context, a particular social hope, and a particular community. Thus these stories offer a distinctly different “mode of truth” concerning this pivotal biblical figure. The tribe, the family, the state, and the assembly each has a different agenda and thus draws a very different portrait of the one who helps define them and is defined by them.

Spirituality of the Psalms

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Series: Facets Series
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 76

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

The seasons of our lives change. Using a model of “orientation—disorientation—new orientation”, Walter Brueggemann explores how the genres of the Psalms can be viewed in terms of their function. This results in fresh readings of these ancient songs that illumine their spiritual depth. The voices of the Psalms come through in all their bold realism.

Deep Memory, Exuberant Hope: Contested Truth in a Post-Christian World

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 168

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

These studies on a variety of biblical texts focus deftly on reading, listening to, and proclaiming the gospel in a broken, fragmented, and “post-Christendom” world. Walter Brueggemann explores how these traditions have the potential to continually resonate in our contemporary communities and individual lives.

This volume received the Best General Interest Book of the Year (2000) award from the Association of Theological Booksellers. Both the publisher and author received the Theologos Award at a dinner held in Brueggemann’s honor.

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

Texts That Linger, Words That Explode: Listening to Prophetic Voices

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 152

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

These studies on the prophetic texts from the Hebrew Bible cover a wide range of topics, challenging the reader to confront the issues of faithfulness, responsibility, and justice in an ever-changing world. Walter Brueggemann explores how these prophetic traditions have the potential to continually resonate in our contemporary communities and individual lives. Rather than “dead words” to kingdoms no longer in existence, the Israelite and Judean prophets have an enduring impact on how God challenges our values, our perspectives—and our very lives. Brueggemann has become well known for providing fresh perspective on ancient texts, always in conversation with great thinkers and people of faith.

Widely published author Walter Brueggemann delves into ancient texts and contemporary consciousness, inviting the reader to rediscover these Scriptures and their radical implications. Perhaps not a comfortable read, but a challenging one nonetheless, from one of today’s leading Old Testament theologians.

The Other Side

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

The Covenanted Self: Exploration in Law and Covenant

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

These exciting studies on the first five books of the Bible cover a wide range of topics, challenging the reader to confront the issues of faithfulness, responsibility, and justice in an ever-changing world. Walter Brueggemann sets the issues of praise and lament, grace and duty, truth and power in new frames of reference that call for a response. He demonstrates that the Christian reader of the Bible can’t blithely pass over the Pentateuch as simply pre-Christian and without relevance. His creative use of metaphor and imagination invite the reader to encounter freshly in these biblical texts God’s call and the work of justice.

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

The Threat of Life: Sermons on Pain, Power, and Weakness

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Charles L. Campbell
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

These 22 sermons from a master interpreter demonstrate how ancient texts can speak to the whole gamut of human experience even now. Included in Walter Brueggemann’s preview are keen observations about the timeless issues of human life, both personal and social: the pain we face, often inflicted on each other; the use and abuse of power; the weakness and fragility of life; the redemptive power of faith; and much more.

Charles L. Campbell is professor of homiletics at Duke Divinity School. His publications include Preaching Fools: The Gospel as a Rhetoric of Folly, The Word Before the Powers: An Ethic of Preaching, and Preaching Jesus: New Directions for Homiletics in Hans Frei’s Postliberal Theory.

The Psalms and the Life of Faith

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 240

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Walter Brueggemann’s unique gift of joining historical-exegetical insights to penetrating observations about the traumas and joys of contemporary life—both personal and social—is here forcefully displayed. Everyone who is familiar with his work knows the power of his speech about “doxological, polemical, political, subversive, evangelical faith” and about the ways such faith is enacted in the praise of ancient Israel and in the church.

Readers of this book will find fresh insight into the categories of the Psalms, the social context in which psalms were prayed and sung, the theology of the Psalms, the dialogical character of the Psalms, and so much more.

The Psalms, for Walter Brueggemann, are not simply ancient texts or routinized elements of a liturgy. As they come to speech, as they are read, they make claims about reality, indeed shape reality in ways more potent and shocking than we usually realize. Brueggemann’s great contribution is to uncover the power of these psalms and to awaken us to what is said and done in singing and praying them.

—from the Introduction

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

A Social Reading of the Old Testament: Prophetic Approaches to Israel’s Communal Life

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1994
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

In this collection of essays, Walter Brueggemann raises a variety of intriguing, contemporary questions on the relation of society and text in the Old Testament, such as:

  • The hidden agendas that underlie the making and reading of Scripture
  • The conflict and tension in ancient Israel
  • The cry to God of the oppressed and God’s response
  • The political dimension of mercy
  • Theodicy, violence, horses, and chariots

Brueggemann opens to a myriad of readers a compelling picture of subversive paradigm and social possibility in the Hebrew Bible.

Raises a variety of intriguing questions related to the relation of society and text in the Old Testament. Brueggemann’s social reading is a constant awareness of the social dimensions of every text.

Patrick D. Miller, Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology, Princeton Theological Seminary

Texts under Negotiation: The Bible and Postmodern Imagination

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1993
  • Pages: 128

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Walter Brueggemann issues a passionate call for a bold restructuring of the imagination of faith in our “postmodern” context.

Old assumptions—rational, objectivist, absolutist—have for the most part given way to new outlooks, which can be grouped under the term “postmodern.” What does this new situation imply for the church and for Christian proclamation? Can one find in this new situation opportunity as well as dilemma? How can central biblical themes—self, world, and community—be interpreted and imagined creatively and concretely in this new context?

Our task, Brueggemann contends, is not to construct a full alternative world, but rather to fund—to provide the pieces, materials, and resources out of which a new world can be imagined. The place of liturgy and proclamation is “a place where people come to receive new materials, or old materials freshly voiced, which will fund, feed, nurture, nourish, legitimate, and authorize a conterimagination of the world.”

Six exegetical examples of such a new approach to the biblical text are included.

Old Testament Theology: Essays on Structure, Theme, and Text

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Editor: Patrick D. Miller
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1992
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

In these essays, Walter Brueggemann addresses the necessity for thinking about the shape and structure of Old Testament theology, and the impact such thinking can have on the larger issues of contemporary life.

Brueggemann draws on the work of persons from all disciplines and incorporates them in a seminal way in his theology. The work of persons in theology, psychology, the social sciences, politics, and the like often provides heuristic possibilities and even basic models for talking about the Old Testament. The Old Testament is seen to be something that has intelligible and significant worldly connections.

Patrick D. Miller is Charles T. Haley Professor Emeritus of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary in Princeton, New Jersey.

Interpretation and Obedience

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1991
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5

Drawing on specific texts that speak to cosmic hurt and personal possibility, Walter Brueggemann demonstrates the essential connection between faithful reading of the biblical text and faithful living in a world of banal, yet threatening values. He assesses the nature of obedience today in such areas as ministry, justice, the land, education, hospitality, and the contemporary imagination.

Using analysis of specific biblical texts as the basis for his analysis of biblical authority, Brueggemann shows how the Bible imaginatively constructs a counter-cultural worldview and how the eternal divine intentions are to be practiced in our contemporary world. Perceiving the biblical alternative to our values is an act of “obedient interpretation,” while “interpretative obedience” discerns how the eternal divine commands are to be expressed in temporal ethical action. In this context, Brueggemann addresses current democratic, ecological, and urbanized crises. Recommended especially for seminary and large academic libraries.

Library Journal

Finally Comes the Poet: Daring Speech for Proclamation

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 184

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

The Christian gospel, says Walter Brueggemann, is too easily preached and heard. Too often technical reason and excessive religious certitude reduce the gospel to coercive, debilitating pietisms that mask the text’s meaning and freeze the hearer’s heart.

With skill and imagination, Brueggemann demonstrates how the preacher can engage in daring speech—differently voiced and therefore differently heard. This speech, as suggested by the Bible itself, is “poetic” speech, enabling the preacher to forge communion in the midst of alienation, bring healing out of guilt, and empower the hearer for “missional imagination.”

As an alternative to theological/homiletical discourse that is moralistic, pietistic or scholastic, Brueggemann proposes preaching that is artistic, poetic, and dramatic. The basis for the 1989 Lyman Beecher Lectures at Yale Divinity School, Finally Comes the Poet is a unique and transforming guide for powerful preaching.

Here we have what we have come to expect from Walter Brueggemann—a fired imagination, harnessed and disciplined. He always respects the integrity both of the biblical text and of the listeners, but he will not allow them to stay apart. He listens to the Scripture and the human condition, and then develops a conversation between the two. This conversation is not only theologically solid but also lively and vigorous. Brueggemann here offers what the gospel itself offers, and that is an alternative world in which to relate to others and in which to function.

Fred B. Craddock, professor of preaching New Testament, Candler School of Theology

Israel’s Praise: Doxology against Idolatry and Ideology

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1988
  • Pages: 208

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

“Praise is the duty and delight, the ultimate vocation of the human community; indeed of all creation. Yet, all life is aimed toward God and finally exists for the sake of God. Praise articulates and embodies our capacity to yield, submit, and abandon ourselves in trust and gratitude to the One whose we are. Praise is not only a human requirement and a human need, it is also a human delight. We have a resilient hunger to move beyond self, to return our energy and worth to the One from whom it has been granted. In our return to that One, we find our deepest joy. That is what it means to glorify God and enjoy God forever.”—from the Introduction

Israel’s Praise contends that, rightly practiced, the Psalms of Israel make available an evangelical world of Yahweh’s sovereignty—a world marked by justice, righteousness, mercy, peace, and compassion.

Hopeful Imagination: Prophetic Voices in Exile

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1986
  • Pages: 160

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Professor Walter Brueggemann here examines the literature and experience of an era in which Israel’s prophets faced the pastoral responsibility of helping people to enter into exile, to be in exile, and to depart out of exile. He addresses three major prophetic traditions: Jeremiah (the pathos of God), Ezekiel (the holiness of God), and 2 Isaiah (the newness of God). This literature is seen to contain the theological resources for handling both brokenness and surprise—with freedom, courage, and imagination. Throughout, Brueggemann demonstrates how these resources offer vitality for ministry today.

The Message of the Psalms: A Theological Commentary

  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1985
  • Pages: 206

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Walter Brueggemann describes the human cries of anguish and the exultations of praise expressed in the Psalms. Particularly noteworthy is his approach to the Psalms from a counseling and pastoral perspective, providing commentary that walks with the reader in any season of life.

This important, lucid book informs readers about recent trends in technical scholarship and offers convincing insights into the Psalter’s sociological background and social-justice implications. The author, one of America’s most highly regarded biblical scholars, writes both about the original meaning of the Psalms and about their use or misuse in modern churches.

—David M. Hay, editor, The Christian Century

Product Details

  • Title: Walter Brueggemann Collection
  • Author: Walter Brueggemann
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Volumes: 24
  • Pages: 5,294

About Walter Brueggemann

Walter Brueggemann through his teaching, lecturing, and writing, has effectively demonstrated the significance of the Old Testament for our fractured world today. Recognized as the preeminent interpreter of the ancient texts in relation to questions posed by a variety of academic disciplines, he has shown the way toward a compelling understanding of the major components of the faith and life of ancient Israel, especially its Psalms, the prophets, and the narratives. His award-winning Theology of the Old Testament quickly became a foundational work in the field.

Brueggemann, who holds a ThD from Union Seminary, New York, and a PhD from St. Louis University, is William Marcellus McPheeters Professor of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia. He was previously professor of Old Testament at Eden Theological Seminary, St. Louis. His many Fortress Press books, including The Threat of Life: Sermons on Pain, Power, and Weakness, exhibit a fecund combination of imaginative power, sound scholarship, and a passion of justice and redemption.