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A Confession of My Faith
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A Confession of My Faith

by

Faithlife 2006

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$2.99

Overview

Bunyan was imprisoned for nearly twelve years for, among other things, his views on communion and baptism. In this book, he offers a defense of his beliefs on the subject. The editor introduces Bunyan's thesis as follows, "His first inquiry is, Who are to be admitted to the Lord's table; and his reply is, Those whom God has received: they have become his children, and are entitled to sit at their Father's table: such only as have examined themselves, and by their conduct lead the church to hope that they have passed from death unto life. The practice of those who admit ungodly persons because they have submitted to some outward ceremonies, he severely condemns. The mixture of the church and the world he deems to be spiritual adultery, the prolific source of sin, and one of the causes of the deluge."

Praise for John Bunyan

Bunyan has always been one of the most popular of the Puritans—no doubt because, while possessing the Word-centeredness as well as the depth of doctrine and experience of other Puritans, he also possessed a warm simplicity of style.

—Reformation and Revival Ministries, Reformation and Revival Volume 5, 2003

Bunyan is best known for his ageless classic, The Pilgrim's Progress. His literary genius in this work [is such] that people are prone to forget that this tinker from Bedford was first and foremost a Pastor and preacher...

—Thomas K. Ascol, The Founders Journal

For over 150 years the accepted edition of The Works of John Bunyan has been that edited by George Offor... This scholarly labor has contributed much toward a better appreciation of Bunyan's gospel motivated writings...

—From Bunyan Ministries

Product Details

  • Title: A Confession of My Faith
  • Author: John Bunyan
  • Editor: George Offor
  • Publisher: John Knox Press
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 25

About John Bunyan

John Bunyan of Elstow and Bedford, is important to the Reformed tradition, since his famous allegory is one of the chief avenues by which the Puritan spirit entered the mainstream of the English Reformation. With Calvinism as foundational, Bunyan’s prolific writings and fervent preaching embodied a vibrant awareness of Reformed theological thought and its implication for Christian living. The author of more than sixty books, he gained a unique place in history through Grace Abounding (1666), The Pilgrim’s Progress (pt. 1, 1678; pt. 2, 1684), The Life and Death of Mr. Badman (1680), and The Holy War (1682). Other works were primarily expository, doctrinal, and practical.

Bunyan joined the Bedford Baptist Church (1654) and soon began preaching in nearby villages. Prosecuted under an Elizabethan act against nonconformity, he was imprisoned for three months, which was extended to twelve years, with a brief respite during the sixth year.Bunyan emphasized the centrality of the Bible as the foundation for belief and conduct, stressing the grace of God as the basis of predestination, the focal point of eternal salvation. Initiative in the salvation of sinners belonged to God, since God elected, within God’s purpose and framework of grace, certain individuals to eternal life. Subscribing to the doctrine of “effectual calling,” Bunyan believed it was impossible to resist the call because of the power with which the Holy Spirit accompanied and illuminated the sinner’s understanding. None of the elect could fall from grace.

Though Bunyan was primarily an adherent of the Calvinist tradition, his view of God as Savior, providing salvation from divine wrath rather than God as sovereign ruler, and his belief in the necessity of justification through grace alone showed influence of Luther. The separatist tradition shaped his view of the sacraments. He strongly opposed teachings of the Quakers and the Arminians.

—taken from The Encyclopedia of Reformed Faith

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