Faithlife Corporation
The Knowledge of God, Objectively and Subjectively Considered (2 vols.)
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The Knowledge of God, Objectively and Subjectively Considered (2 vols.)

by

Robert Carter & Brothers, A. Davidson 1859

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$23.99

Overview

Considered Robert J. Breckinridge’s masterwork, The Knowledge of God, Objectively Considered and The Knowledge of God, Subjectively Considered comprise his systematic theology of the nature of Man, God, the covenants, mediation and communion with God, and the church. Each book is divided into five parts that investigate the revelation of God in each aspect of theology. For Breckinridge, theology is a pure science, and he presents his arguments with both inductive and deductive methods of reasoning.

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Interested in more? Be sure to check out Works of Robert J. Breckinridge.

Product Details

Individual Titles

  • The Knowledge of God, Objectively Considered: Being the First Part of Theology Considered as a Science of Positive Truth, Both Inductive and Deductive
  • The Knowledge of God, Subjectively Considered: Being the Second Part of Theology Considered as a Science of Positive Truth, Both Inductive and Deductive

About Robert J. Breckinridge

Robert J. Breckinridge, (1800–1871) grandfather of Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield, was a politician, Presbyterian minister, author, abolitionist, and champion of education. Ordained in 1832, Breckinridge pastored the Second Presbyterian Church of Baltimore, Maryland before accepting the position of President of Jefferson College in 1845. Soon after, Breckinridge would return to his native Kentucky as a pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Lexington and as Superintendent of Public Education. Under his guidance, attendance increased ten-fold. As the civil war unfolded, Breckinridge was an outspoken abolitionist and supporter of the Union, a position not popular in his home state of Kentucky.