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Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine Periods (from B.C. 146 to A.D. 1100)

Overview

The sheer range that the Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine Periods covers sets it apart from virtually all other lexicons. In English, there are only two lexicons that even attempt to cover this time period. LSJM does its best to cover post-Classical Greek, but it does at times fall short for reading certain Koine or Patristic texts. This is because, though the ninth edition works to cover a larger Greek corpus, its origins as a chiefly Classical Greek lexicon regularly show through. In contrast, Sophocles' Greek Lexicon was created from the start using a larger corpus of Greek texts from its inception and thus, these challenges are far less common.

With Logos Bible Software, Sophocles’ extensive knowledge can be accessed more quickly and more efficiently than ever. As a lexicon, this text will easily permit engagement with primary source materials, making it possible to quickly access post-classical definitions in a convenient way as you study Greek texts.

  • Title: Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine Periods (From B. C. 146 to A. D. 1100)
  • Author: E. A. Sophocles
  • Edition: Memorial Edition
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Print Publication Date: 1900
  • Logos Release Date: 2014
  • Era: era:modern
  • Language: English
  • Resources: 1
  • Format: Digital > Logos Edition
  • Subjects: Greek language > Dictionaries--English; English language > Dictionaries--Greek
  • Resource ID: LLS:GRKLEXROMBYZ
  • Resource Type: Lexicon
  • Metadata Last Updated: 2019-05-10T17:23:51Z

About Evangelinus Apostolides Sophocles

Evangelinus Apostolides Sophocles was born near Thessaly, Greece in March, 1807. During the Greek revolution he lived in Egypt, studying in St. Catherine's Monastery at Mount Sinai. Sophocles moved to the United States in 1829 through the patronage of the American board of commissioners for foreign missions. Between 1840 and 1849, he was a tutor at Harvard, after which he was appointed as assistant professor. In 1860 he was appointed as Professor of Ancient, Byzantine, and Modern Greek. Professor Sophocles published a number of introductory volumes on Modern Greek, but his magnus opus was his lexicon, Greek Lexicon of the Roman and Byzantine Periods, B.C. 146–A.D. 1100. He died on December 17th, 1883.