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The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: Historical Books (NICOT) (4 vols.)

by 4 authors Woudstra, Marten H., Hubbard, Robert L., Jr., Tsumura, David, Fensham, Frank

Eerdmans 1981–2007

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The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: Historical Books (NICOT) (4 vols.)
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Overview

This collection includes the volumes on the Historical Books from The New International Commentary on the Old Testament to provide an exposition of Scripture that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship, yet at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God. This conviction, shared by all contributors to The New International Commentary on the Old Testament, defines the goal of this ambitious series.

This decades-long project has become recognized by scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students as critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition. The New International Commentary on the Old Testament serves as authoritative scriptural guides, bridging the cultural gap between today’s world and the Bible’s. Each volume in the NICOT aims to help us hear God’s word as clearly as possible.

Scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students will welcome the fresh light that this commentary series casts on ancient yet familiar biblical texts. The contributors apply their proven scholarly expertise and wide experience as teachers to illumine our understanding of the Old Testament. Gifted writers, they present the results of the best recent research in an interesting, readable, and thought-provoking manner.

Each commentary opens with an introduction to the biblical book in question, looking especially at questions concerning its background, authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology. A select bibliography also points readers to resources for their own study. The author’s own translation from the original Hebrew and Greek texts forms the basis of the commentary proper. Verse-by-verse comments nicely balance the in-depth discussions of technical matters—such as textual criticism and critical problems—with exposition of the biblical writer’s theology and its implications for the life of faith today.

With Logos, The New International Commentary on the Old Testament will integrate into the Passage Guide. Whenever you enter your passage and click go, results from the NICOT will appear on the text you’re studying. This gives you instant access to exactly what you’re looking for—in far less time than it would take you to walk over to the bookshelf and begin flipping through a print volume, let alone find the information you need.

Key Features

  • Verse-by-verse commentary
  • In-depth discussion of textual and critical matters
  • Introductions to each book’s authorship, date, purpose, structure, and theology

Praise for the Print Edition

The NIC is an amazing scholarly, protestant, evangelical commentary series. It gives verse-by-verse commentary on almost every book of the Bible, including immensely helpful introductory information. The only thing better than the commentary series itself is being able to have the entire thing with you, on your laptop, wherever you go. The NIC for Logos is a great resource that every seminarian should consider.

—GoingtoSeminary.com review

Individual Titles

The Book of Joshua

  • Author: Marten H. Woudstra
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1981
  • Pages: 410

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Recognizing that Old Testament studies today are in a state of flux as never before and that the book of Joshua seems to be at the crossroads of this animated discussion, Marten Woudstra here takes into careful account the various views represented by recent scholarship as well as Hebrew usage and text-critical concerns.

Woudstra demonstrates that the central theme in Joshua, to which everything in the book has been made subordinate, is the fulfillment of God’s promise to the patriarchs regarding the promised land. To support his understanding of this central theme, Woudstra emphasizes the nature of the Hebrew narrative as both proleptic, offering provisional summaries of events to be taken up later in considerable detail, and programmatic, indicating that the book was written close to actual events. The excellent introduction and section-by-section commentary are supplemented by an extensive bibliography and seven instructive maps.

This volume must surely be regarded as the finest commentary on the Book of Joshua. . . . Should be a part of the library of any serious student of the Scriptures who anticipates teaching or preaching from this important and colorful Old Testament [book].

Bibliotheca Sacra

This commentary marks a significant advance in Joshua studies and outstrips its competitors by a wide margin.

Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society

Woudstra time and again demonstrates his sound exegetical judgment and theological insight in this book. In doing so, he has advanced our overall understanding of the book of Joshua in several positive directions.

Westminster Theological Journal

Well conceived, ably prepared. The translation, comments, and textual apparatus are excellent.

Journal of Biblical Literature

Marten H. Woudstra was a professor of Old Testament studies at Calvin Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, MI. A member of the Bible translation committees for The Berkeley Version in Modern English and the New International Version and a past president of the Evangelical Theological Society, he wrote several scholarly books and numerous articles on the Old Testament.

The Book of Ruth

  • Author: Robert L. Hubbard Jr.
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1989
  • Pages: 331

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Book of Ruth contains one of the Bible’s best-known and most-loved stories. This major commentary by Robert L. Hubbard shows how the author of Ruth used, with great literary artistry, the story of Ruth and Naomi to convey important theological themes.

In his introduction, Hubbard discusses issues of text, canonicity, literary criticism, authorship and date, purpose, setting, genre, legal background, and themes and theology and concludes with an outline of the book and a thorough bibliography. The commentary proper is based on Hubbard’s own fresh translation and is accented by copious footnotes on textual, philological, and literary matters.

Gleaning the best from recent research on Ruth, Hubbard gives the story’s rich literary, grammatical, and theological dimensions a careful, rigorous treatment. He allows for the possibility that the anonymous author was a woman and argues that the narrative itself aims to counter opposition to the Davidic monarchy in Israel and Judah during Solomon’s reign. Throughout, Hubbard’s sensitivity to the literary genius of Ruth’s author and his coherent explication of the outworking of the book’s theological themes make this volume an invaluable tool for anyone desiring to explore the beautiful story of Ruth in depth.

It is safe to say that this will remain, for some considerable time to come, one of the most useful and enlightening commentaries available on the lovely little book of Ruth.

Themelios

This commentary is a pleasure to work with. . . . Hubbard gives clarity to this beautiful portion of God’s word, and by so doing strengthens the faith of its user.

Vox Reformata

Robert L. Hubbard Jr. is a professor of Old Testament at North Park Theological Seminary in Chicago and replaced the late R. K. Harrison as general editor of the New International Commentary on the Old Testament series. His publications include several articles in leading scholarly journals and in the revised International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. He is also the author of the volume on 1 and 2 Kings in the Everyman’s Bible Commentary series.

The First Book of Samuel

  • Author: David Toshio Tsumura
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 720

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

David and Goliath, the call of Samuel, the witch of Endor, David and Bathsheba—such biblical stories are well known. But the books of 1 and 2 Samuel, where they are recorded, are among the most difficult books in the Bible. The Hebrew text is widely considered corrupt and sometimes even unintelligible. The social and religious customs are strange and seem to diverge from the tradition of Moses. In this first part of an ambitious two-volume commentary on the books of Samuel, David Toshio Tsumura sheds considerable light on the background of 1 Samuel, looking carefully at the Philistine and Canaanite cultures, as he untangles the difficult Hebrew text.

David Tsumura’s commentary on 1 Samuel is a major work in an already well-populated field. His specialty in Hebrew language and stylistics enables him to make a unique contribution to the textual study of this biblical book, and he challenges many settled explanations of the text. Tsumura’s engagement with the secondary literature is formidable, and his introduction is unusually informative on a wide range of features relating to the text and its interpretation. This is a notable commentary achievement.

Robert P. Gordon, Regius Professor of Hebrew, University of Cambridge

A recognized expert in Ugaritic and modern linguistics, David Tsumura brings the full resources of both to bear in this remarkable commentary based on a new interpretation of the Hebrew text of 1 Samuel. . . . An essential starting point for future study of this biblical book.

Richard S. Hess, Earl S. Kalland Professor of Old Testament and Semitic Languages, Denver Seminary

David Tsumura has made his reputation in precise, well-balanced studies of Hebrew poetry and in the language of Ugarit. He applies his wide knowledge of ancient Semitic languages and of modern discourse linguistics to illuminate the biblical text. He clarifies many obscure passages—for example, the ‘golden mice’ of chapter 6. Aware of current fashions in biblical exegesis, Tsumura presents his independent, carefully considered judgments to help readers appreciate the excitement and the value of 1 Samuel.

—Alan Millard, emeritus professor and honorary senior fellow, University of Liverpool

David Toshio Tsumura is a professor of Old Testament at Japan Bible Seminary in Tokyo, chairman of the Tokyo Museum of Biblical Archaeology, and editor of Exegetica: Studies in Biblical Exegesis.

The Books of Ezra and Nehemiah

  • Author: F. Charles Fensham
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1983
  • Pages: 301

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Providing clear exposition based on solid contemporary scholarship, this commentary by F. Charles Fensham examines the books of Ezra and Nehemiah—two books of Scripture that are especially important for understanding the last century of Old Testament Jewish history and for marking the beginnings of Judaism.

A biblical scholar well known for his expertise in ancient Near Eastern studies, especially Ugaritic, Fensham places Ezra and Nehemiah against the ancient Near Eastern environment. In his introduction, Fensham discusses the original unity of the books as well as the problems of authorship. He then treats the historical and religious background of the books, taking special note of the development of a Jewish religious society in postexilic times. Text and language are examined next, followed by a thorough bibliography.

The commentary proper, based on Fensham’s own fresh translation of the biblical texts, is richly documented and displays cautious good judgment, willingness to consider different options, a sensible approach, and keen insight into the religious meaning of these key Hebrew texts.

This is a very useful commentary. The author’s scholarship provides a sound base. His bibliography is inclusive and up to date. He interacts with all important positions on major questions. His view is conservative and clearly reasoned. A commendable work.

Bibliotheca Sacra

Provides Old Testament students with a most excellent tool for the analysis and exegesis of Ezra and Nehemiah. This volume has many strengths and practical suggestions for treating problem passages, and follows a good and logical outline of the combined texts. Ministers as well as scholars will find it useful.

Hebrew Studies

The strengths of this volume are clear. Fensham uses his expertise in Semitic languages to address the many linguistic difficulties which appear in these two biblical books. In addition, his use of ancient Near Eastern history and archaeology is helpful. These elements, plus generous documentation, make this a substantial commentary.

Biblical Theology Bulletin

F. Charles Fensham was a professor of Semitic languages at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. Author of several books, including a commentary on Exodus, he also served as the editor of the Journal of Northwest Semitic Languages.

Product Details

  • Title: The New International Commentary on the Old Testament: Historical Books (NICOT)
  • Series: The New International Commentary on the Old Testament
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Volumes: 4
  • Pages: 1,762