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Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament (11 vols.)
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Overview

Paideia: Commentaries on the New Testament explores how New Testament texts inform Christian readers by:

  • Attending to the ancient narrative and rhetorical strategies the text employs
  • Showing how the text shapes theological convictions and moral habits
  • Commenting on the final, canonical form of each New Testament book
  • Focusing on the cultural, literary, and theological settings of the text
  • Making judicious use of maps, photos, and sidebars in a reader-friendly format

The Paideia series approaches each text in its final, canonical form, proceeding by sense units (pericopes) rather than word-by-word or verse-by-verse. Thus, each commentary follows the original train of thought as indicated by the author and not necessarily modern artificial distinctions. On account this approach, one is able to grasp not only the exegetical-historical information of the passage, but also will be able to see thought in its coherent and theological expression.

Finally, this series is enormously helpful and practical through its usage of small visual presentations of historical, exegetical, and theological information. Highly user friendly, this is a great resource for college students, pastors, or those who want to take their Bible study to another level.

Logos Bible Software dramatically improves the value of any resource by enabling you to find what you’re looking for with lightning speed and unbelievable precision. All Scripture passages are linked directly to the original language texts and English translations, and double-clicking any Greek word automatically opens a lexicon to help you decipher its meaning and understand its context. As you’re reading the Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament, you can easily search and access topics or Scripture references you come across, making sermon preparation or Bible study easier than ever. What’s more, you can also link the Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament to the other commentaries in your library for quick and accurate research for scholarly projects, sermon preparation, and personal study.

Key Features

  • Includes introductions and bibliographies for each book
  • Contains indexes of subjects, modern authors, and Scripture and ancient sources
  • Provides notes, outlines, images, and tables for further clarity

Individual Titles

Matthew

  • Author: Charles H. Talbert
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 400

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this fresh commentary, leading New Testament scholar Charles Talbert examines cultural context and theological meaning in Matthew. This commentary approaches each text in its final, canonical form, proceeding by sense units rather than word-by-word or verse-by-verse. Each sense unit is explored in three sections: introductory matters, tracing the train of thought, and key hermeneutical and theological questions. Graduate and seminary students, professors, and pastors will benefit from this readable commentary, as will theological libraries.

Most commentaries rewrite earlier commentaries. The better ones, to the contrary, often go their own way. Talbert’s work happily is of the latter type. It regularly offers fresh readings and new comparative materials, especially from Greco-Roman sources. This is not a tired rehashing but a welcome contribution.

Dale C. Allison Jr., Errett M. Grable Professor of New Testament Exegesis and Early Christianity, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

In this stimulating reading of Matthew’s Gospel, Charles Talbert draws on his extensive learning to attend insightfully to various cultural, literary, and theological dimensions of the Gospel. Students will find his clear prose, insightful discussion, and theological reflections especially valuable. I will be adding this commentary to course bibliographies

Warren Carter, professor of New Testament, Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University

Charles H. Talbert is distinguished professor of religion at Baylor University. He is the general editor for Reading the New Testament Commentary and the author of several other editions in the series. He received a B.D. from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and his PhD from Vanderbilt University. He has written many articles, reviews, commentaries and books, including Reading the Sermon on the Mount. He has the distinction of being the only person to serve as president of both the National Association of Baptist Professors of Religion and the Catholic Biblical Association.

Mark

  • Author: Mary Ann Beavis
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 336

In this volume, Mary Ann Beavis examines cultural context and theological meaning in Mark. Students, pastors, and other readers will appreciate the insights that Beavis derives from interrogating the text through multiple perspectives.

Beavis brings to this commentary ample familiarity with the text of Mark and with ancient literature more broadly. Balanced in judgment and offering numerous astute observations, this work should prove highly useful, especially to serious readers seeking a reliable introduction and companion for their study of Mark’s account of Jesus’ ministry.

Larry W. Hurtado, professor of New Testament language, literature, and theology, New College, University of Edinburgh

Mary Ann Beavis (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of religion and Culture at St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan, in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. She is the author of Jesus and Utopia: Looking for the Kingdom of God in the Roman World as well as numerous articles.

John

  • Author: Jo-Ann A. Brant
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 416

The Gospel of John, full of striking language and symbolism, is familiar to many as a sourcebook of favorite quotations. It’s far more difficult to read this complex and subtle Gospel as a coherent whole on its own terms. In this volume, Jo-Ann A. Bryant, an expert on John’s dramatic rhetoric, helps students and pastors do just that.

This marvelous commentary is packed with substantive information and fresh insights. Brant draws on current literary approaches and an array of useful sources from antiquity to illumine John’s Gospel. She likewise makes the complexities of the Greek text intelligible for English readers. . . . As with other volumes in the Paideia series, this one is masterfully designed to provide optimum access for readers.

Craig S. Keener, professor of New Testament, Palmer Seminary

Brant skillfully mines the Greco-Roman literary, rhetorical, and social world of the Fourth Gospel and writes with brevity that moves the reader briskly along from one fresh insight to the next. The result is paideia—a wonderfully formative experience!

—R. Alan Culpepper, dean, McAfee School of Theology, Mercer University

Jo-Ann A. Brant (PhD, McMaster University) is professor of Bible, religion, and philosophy at Goshen College in Goshen, Indiana. She is the author of Dialogue and Drama: Elements of Greek Tragedy in the Fourth Gospel and has contributed to several books.

Acts

  • Author: Mikeal C. Parsons
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 464

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Acts, leading biblical scholar Mikeal Parsons gleans fresh theological insight into Acts by attending carefully to the cultural and educational context from which it emerges. Parsons see Acts as a charter document explaining and legitimating Christian identity for a general audience of early Christians living in the ancient Mediterranean world. Graduate and seminary students, professors, and pastors will benefit from this readable commentary, as will theological libraries.

Parsons draws on his extensive studies of Greco-Roman literature and ancient concepts of physiognomy to provide a useful and illuminating commentary.

—Joseph B. Tyson, Catholic Biblical Quarterly

Parsons presents a masterful exposition both of the myriad strategies whereby the author of Acts attempted to persuade his original audience, and of the ways in which this ancient book continues to speak powerfully to Christian faith in our own day. Readers will find here a treasure trove of insights into Hellenistic rhetorical conventions and their usage in Acts.

—John A. Darr, associate professor Theology Department, Boston College

Mikeal C. Parsons (PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is the Kidd L. and Buna Hitchcock Macon Chair in Religion at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. He is the author of Body and Character in Luke and Acts and coauthor of Illuminating Luke, Acts: A Handbook on the Greek Text, and Rethinking the Unity of Luke and Acts.

Romans

  • Author: Frank J. Matera
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this volume, respected New Testament scholar Frank Matera examines cultural context and theological meaning in Romans. This commentary approaches each text in its final, canonical form, proceeding by sense units rather than word-by-word or verse-by-verse. Each sense unit is explored in three sections: introductory matters, tracing the train of thought, and key hermeneutical and theological questions. Graduate and seminary students, professors, and pastors will benefit from this readable commentary, as will theological libraries.

Matera’s commentary focusing on God’s saving righteousness revealed in the Gospel is a lucid exposition of Romans. A great gift not only to students but also to seasoned interpreters of Paul.

—Michael J. Gorman, professor of New Testament, St. Mary’s Seminary and University, Baltimore

Matera wisely distills and dispenses the massive scholarship on Romans. Students will find here an excellently organized, clear, and substantial description and discussion of this important and complex letter. Matera’s personal passion for Paul’s magnificent convictions in Romans energizes this fine introductory commentary.

L. Ann Jervis, professor of New Testament, Wycliffe College, University of Toronto

Frank J. Matera (PhD, Union Theological Seminary) is professor of New Testament and Andrews-Kelly-Ryan Professor of Biblical Studies at The Catholic University of America. His previous books include commentaries on Galatians and 2 Corinthians as well as New Testament Theology: Exploring Diversity and Unity.

First Corinthians

  • Author: Pheme Perkins
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In First Corinthians, respected scholar, Pheme Perkins, examines cultural context and theological meaning in First Corinthians.

Professor Perkins has produced a commentary on 1 Corinthians that has the merit of being both learned and concise. She provides readers with a wealth of information about the cultural and historical background of the text without neglecting its theological meaning and significance. This is an ideal commentary for students and pastors seeking a reliable guide to one of Paul’s most important letters.

Frank J. Matera, Andrews-Kelly-Ryan Professor of Biblical Studies, Catholic University of America

This relatively concise and accessible commentary helpfully situates Paul’s letter in its first-century context through its valuable discussions of key background issues and its generous use of sidebars with quotations of relevant material from ancient sources. Pastors and students will benefit from the contextual focus as well as from Perkins’ informed approach to theological interpretation, even if they reach some different conclusions along the way.

Roy Ciampa, professor of New Testament, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

Pheme Perkins is renowned for her independence of mind and the focus and precision of her thinking. Here she combines these rare qualities in an account of 1 Corinthians that is thoroughly up to date on the best scholarship and elegantly brings its intended readership into the central questions of the letter—cultural, literary, and theological.

Troels Engberg-Pedersen, professor of New Testament, Faculty of Theology, University of Copenhagen

This relatively new series is aimed squarely at students of the New Testament (e.g., seminarians, theology majors, graduate students). The goal is for the reader to understand the context and content of the particular New Testament book under consideration. Rather than present a verse-by-verse exposition, the commentators consider each cohesive segment of the biblical book. All these goals are well accomplished by Pheme Perkins. . . . In her introduction to the letter and in the body of the commentary she provides a thorough exposition of Paul’s theology and its relationship to the wider context of Judaism and the Greco-Roman world. . . . [Provides] the reader with ample quotations from ancient authors and observations about the social, political, and religious context of Paul’s world; these are accompanied by various outlines, maps, and apt black and white photos of pertinent sites. All of this makes this commentary on 1 Corinthians a valuable resource for the intended audience.

The Bible Today

Pheme Perkins is professor of theology at Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. She is the author of numerous books, including Introduction to the Synoptic Gospels, Reading the New Testament, Peter: Apostle for the Whole Church, Gnosticism and the New Testament, and several commentaries.

Second Corinthians

  • Author: Raymond F. Collins
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 320

In Second Corinthians, a respected senior New Testament scholar, Raymond F. Collins, examines cultural context and theological meaning in Second Corinthians.

Raymond F. Collins is a Roman Catholic priest of the Diocese of Providence and the author of numerous books and commentaries. Prior to his retirement, he was professor of New Testament at Catholic University of America. He lives in Saunderstown, Rhode Island.

Ephesians and Colossians

  • Author: Charles H. Talbert
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 320

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this volume, leading New Testament scholar Charles Talbert distills interpretive insights for students in theology, biblical studies, and religion. Ephesians and Colossians approaches each text in its final, canonical form, proceeding by sense units rather than word-by-word or verse-by-verse. Thus the commentary follows the original train of thought as indicated by the author and not necessarily modern artificial distinctions. On account of this approach, one is able to grasp not only the exegetical-historical information of the passage, but also will be able to see thought in its coherent and theological expression.

Talbert’s work reveals mastery of both ancient literature and previous scholarship. Careful explanation of difficult concepts and worldviews of the documents will assure a large audience among the students to whom this commentary series is primarily aimed.

—Margaret Y. MacDonald, Catholic Biblical Quarterly

Here is a commentary that has about everything you really want and almost nothing you don’t want! Talbert is clear, concise, informative, and interesting, providing solid exegesis and exhibiting judicious and balanced wisdom throughout. This is a most auspicious beginning to a new commentary series. I recommend it very enthusiastically.

Donald A. Hagner, George Eldon Ladd Professor of New Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary

Charles H. Talbert is distinguished professor of religion at Baylor University. He is the general editor for Reading the New Testament Commentary and the author of several other editions in the series. He received a BD from The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. He has written many articles, reviews, commentaries and books, including Reading the Sermon on the Mount. He has the distinction of being the only person to serve as president of both the National Association of Baptist Professors of Religion and the Catholic Biblical Association.

Hebrews

  • Author: James W. Thompson
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 336

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Hebrews, James Thompson brings the insight of a veteran teacher and writer to bear on a New Testament book whose rich imagery and memorable phrases have long shaped Christian discourse.

Thompson’s masterful commentary on Hebrews will be a boon to students, preachers, and experts alike. Its clear, readable style, accompanied by a wealth of sidebars and charts, makes one of the most obscure books of the New Testament easily accessible.

—Alan C. Mitchell, Review of Biblical Literature

With a firm grasp on the theological, ecclesial, historical, social, and literary issues, James W. Thompson has produced a commentary on Hebrews that is clear, compelling, and helpful. In Thompson’s hands, this often difficult biblical book breaks open with new power and meaning.

—Thomas G. Long, Bandy Professor of Preaching, Candler School of Theology, Emory University

This is a detailed and scholarly, though not overly technical commentary on Hebrews, drawing upon a wealth of recent scholarship, especially on studies of the epistle’s rhetorical structure and argumentation. Illustrations and inserted boxes with outlines or brief factual information make this an attractive tool for students. . . . A valuable commentary.

International Review of Biblical Studies

James W. Thompson (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is the Robert and Kay Onstead Distinguished Professor of Biblical Studies and associate dean of the Graduate School of Theology at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas. He is the editor of Restoration Quarterly and the author of several books, including Pastoral Ministry according to Paul, Preaching like Paul, and The Beginnings of Christian Philosophy.

James and Jude

  • Authors: John Painter and David A. deSilva
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Two respected New Testament scholars offer a practical commentary on James and Jude that’s conversant with contemporary scholarship, draws on ancient backgrounds, and attends to the theological nature of the texts.

I can think of no one more qualified than John Painter and David deSilva to write on James and Jude respectively. They have produced an admirable work, both in its scholarly integrity and in its literary clarity. They have adhered to the goal of the Paideia series in not writing a detailed exegetical commentary but rather ‘attending to the cultural, literary and theological settings of the final form of the text’ and bringing out the rhetorical strategies employed. This increases rather than limits the value of the work, allowing for a focus and clarity that might not otherwise be possible. I recommend this work; no future work on these two letters will be complete without using it.

Peter Davids, visiting professor in Christianity, Houston Baptist University

James and Jude makes an excellent contribution to the impressive Paideia commentary series. John Painter’s commentary on James exhibits all the traits of a master interpreter. The introductory material is rich without being dense or convoluted. The commentary itself is concise and loaded with insight. David deSilva’s commentary on Jude is a gem. Who knew that so much of interest could be extracted from such a brief epistle? Students will benefit greatly from this well-written volume. Veteran scholars are also encouraged to add it to their library.

Craig A. Evans, Payzant Distinguished Professor of New Testament, Acadia Divinity College

Painter and deSilva are to be congratulated for taking their readers and the biblical text seriously. They do not dumb down their discussions, but neither do they make brute historical, linguistic, and sociological facts the centerpiece of what they say. In these pages, thoughtful and practical reflection (‘Theological Issues’) always follows a close analysis of the Greek text (‘Tracing the Train of Thought’). The authors teach that understanding is not an end in itself; they insist that a robust faith is alien in any culture and that it is lived.

mdash;James Riley Strange, assistant professor of religion, Samford University

John Painter is biblical research scholar and professor of theology at the Charles Sturt University School of Theology in Canberra, Australia. He is the author of Just James: The Brother of Jesus in History and Tradition and several other books.

David A. deSilva is Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio. His numerous books include Introducing the Apocrypha and An Introduction to the New Testament: Contexts, Methods, and Ministry Formation.

First and Second Peter

  • Authors: Duane F. Watson and Terrance Callan
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 272

In this volume, New Testament scholars Duane Watson and Terrance Callan examine cultural context and theological meaning in First and Second Peter. This commentary, like each in the series, proceeds by sense units rather than word-by-word or verse-by-verse. Students, pastors, and other readers will appreciate the historical, literary, and theological insight Watson and Callan offer in interpreting First and Second Peter.

Duane Watson and Terrance Callan, each of whom has written significantly on Second Peter, team up here to provide a fresh and coherent exposition of both letters—a most welcome contribution to Petrine studies and a valuable tool for reassessing the difficult question of the relationship between the two canonical letters bearing Peter’s name.

J. Ramsey Michaels, professor of religious studies emeritus, Missouri State University

Duane Watson and Terrance Callan have written a solid, rhetorically informed commentary that fulfills the aspirations of the Paideia series—namely, a work that will be readable, informative, and serviceable for students of the New Testament. Their depth of scholarship on these works, gained from years of study and teaching, is now made accessible in one place. I look forward to recommending this work to my own students.

Peter H. Davids, visiting professor in Christianity, Houston Baptist University

Watson and Callan’s commentary on 1 and 2 Peter provides a helpful combination of attention to the biblical text, ancient sources and context, and theological issues. This clearly written work will be appreciated by both pastors and students who want to learn more about these biblical texts, the contexts in which they arose, and their theological implications for the church today.

Ruth Anne Reese, professor of New Testament, Asbury Theological Seminary

In an age of overly large volumes that easily swamp students with detail, Watson and Callan’s tome on the Petrine Epistles offers the best of contemporary scholarship with concise precision. A masterful and complete commentary full of sound and sober interpretive judgment combined with blocks of contextual and theological insights, this accessible text will also aid the busy pastor concerned for faithful biblical exposition.

Gene L. Green, professor of New Testament, Wheaton College

[Watson] demonstrate[s] a profound understanding of both the text of 1 Peter and the environment in which it came into being. . . . Watson’s entire contribution is engaging and intelligent. Callan’s too, for his exposition of 2 Peter is just as nicely and competently done as Watson’s of 1 Peter. . . . The bibliography which concludes the volume is extensive and up to date and the indices are very complete. . . . This is a quite impressive achievement both in terms of the contents of the book and the way in which that content is presented to the reader. This is a commendable, well written, enjoyable addition to any library.

Jim West, adjunct professor of biblical studies, Quartz Hill School of Theology

Duane F. Watson is professor of New Testament studies at Malone College in Canton, Ohio, and is the editor of several books, including Reading Second Peter with New Eyes.

Terrance Callan is the dean of special studies at the Athenaeum of Ohio in Cincinnati, Ohio, and has published several books, including The Origins of Christian Faith.

Product Details

  • Title: Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament
  • Series: Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament
  • Publisher: Baker Academic
  • Volumes: 11
  • Pages: 3,808