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Does God Care For Our Great Cities?

by Bonar, Horatius

J. Nisbet & Co. 1880

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Overview

Based on his observations of the missionary work in France, Bonar dedicates this concise book to the hard working Protestant pastors whom he met on his travels, and who he feels are doing God’s work among the “wickedness of the city.”

In the Logos edition of Does God Care For Our Great Cities?, all Scripture references link to original language texts and English Bible translations in your digital library and display on mouseover. Logos’ advanced tools make this resource the most useful edition for sermon preparation, theological research, and historical study.

Key Features

  • Discusses missionary work that took place in Paris
  • Provides a message to the pastors of the Protestant Church in France

Product Details

  • Title: Does God Care For Our Great Cities?
  • Author: Horatius Bonar
  • Publisher: J. Nisbet & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1880
  • Pages: 127

About Horatius Bonar

Horatius Bonar was born and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, in a family with a long history of ministry in the Church of Scotland. After graduating from the University of Edinburgh in 1838 (where he studied under Dr. Thomas Chalmers), Bonar was ordained and became pastor of the North Parish, Kelso, where he remained for 28 years. He joined the Free Church of Scotland after “the Great Disruption” of 1843, and in 1853 he earned a doctor of divinity degree from the University of Aberdeen. In 1867, he took over ministry duties at Chalmers Memorial Church in Edinburgh, and in 1883 he was elected Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. A prolific author, he wrote and edited numerous books, biographies, articles, poems, tracts, and over 600 hymns. Horatius Bonar died on May 31, 1889.