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Baker Academic Biblical Theology Collection (3 vols.)

  • Format:Digital

$95.99

Overview

The Baker Academic Biblical Theology Collection analyzes the relationship between Old and New Testament theology. Exploring what the Old Testament says about the Messiah, divine kingship, and the nature of God in Christian Scripture, this collection addresses key theological themes while also examining how New Testament documents fit together as a canonical whole that supplements the Old Testament to make up the Christian Scriptures.

  • Offers a comprehensive treatment of the Messiah theme throughout the entire Old Testament
  • Focuses on pivotal Old Testament passages that unpack the nature of God in Christian Scripture
  • Shows how the New Testament writings provide basic material for Christian doctrine, spirituality, and engagement with culture
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In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using Overview tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

God’s Messiah in the Old Testament: Expectations of a Coming King

  • Authors: Andrew T. Abernethy, Gregory Goswell
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Pages: 304

Christians who open the Old Testament expecting to find promises of a royal Messiah on every page often end up perplexed. Where is the Messiah and how does he fit within the wider vision of the Old Testament and its books?

Addressing a topic of perennial interest and foundational significance, this volume offers a fresh, comprehensive treatment of the Messiah theme throughout the entire Old Testament and examines its relevance for New Testament interpretation. Andrew Abernethy and Gregory Goswell explore what the Old Testament actually says about the Messiah, divine kingship, and the kingdom of God. They also offer a nuanced understanding of how New Testament authors make use of Old Testament messianic texts in explaining who Jesus is and what he came to do. The result is a multifaceted, panoramic view of God’s intention to involve a royal Messiah in the establishment of his kingdom.

Jesus is the Messiah, the Christ, the King. So what happens when you look back into the Old Testament for passages that might foreshadow him? If you wonder about the kind of passages that could have fed into an understanding of Jesus as King, then this book will examine them for you and with you.

—John Goldingay, professor of Old Testament, Fuller Theological Seminary

Andrew T. Abernethy (PhD, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is associate professor of Old Testament and degree coordinator of the MA in Biblical Exegesis at Wheaton College. He has written or edited several books, including The Book of Isaiah and God’s Kingdom.

Gregory Goswell (PhD, University of Sydney) is academic dean and lecturer in Old Testament at Christ College, Sydney, Australia. He is the author of Unceasing Kindness: A Biblical Theology of Ruth and a commentary on Ezra-Nehemiah.

Reading the New Testament as Christian Scripture: A Literary, Canonical, and Theological Survey

  • Authors: Constantine R. Campbell, Jonathan T. Pennington
  • Series: Reading Christian Scripture
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Pages: 432

Reading the New Testament as Christian Scripture is designed to meet the needs of contemporary evangelical undergraduates. This survey textbook effectively covers the New Testament books and major topics in the New Testament, assuming no prior academic study of the Bible.

Many introductions to the New Testament focus on critical issues such as authorship, background, and history. While this book addresses these important issues as well, its focus is on reading the text of the New Testament itself. The authors believe the New Testament should be read from multiple angles: historically, literarily, canonically, theologically, and ecclesially. They pay attention to how the New Testament documents fit together as a canonical whole that supplements the Old Testament to make up the Christian Scriptures. They also show how the New Testament writings provide basic material for Christian doctrine, spirituality, and engagement with culture.

This is the first volume in a new series of survey textbooks that will cover the Old and New Testaments. The book features full-color illustrations that hold interest and aid learning and offers a full array of pedagogical aids: photographs, sidebars, maps, time lines, charts, glossary, and discussion questions. Chapters can be assigned in any order, making this an ideal textbook for one-semester courses at evangelical schools.

The challenges facing anyone seeking to introduce the literature and message of the New Testament to this generation are many. Constantine Campbell and Jonathan Pennington have successfully responded to them with this remarkably useful and effective survey, rooted in their exhortation to read the biblical revelation as disciples expecting transformation. Color-coded sidebars punctuate each section, inviting students to consider intriguing insights, questions, and observations. Each chapter ends with ‘Christian Reading Questions’ that summon further reflection. The book is littered with full-color maps, diagrams, tables, and photographs and concludes with a glossary of key terms highlighted throughout. Precious few texts succeed where this one excels—winsomely equipping beginning students of the New Testament with enough resources to understand and respond to its message without burying them with information. It will quickly become a standard choice for both novice and veteran educators. I enthusiastically recommend it!

—Jonathan Lunde, professor of New Testament, Biola University

Constantine R. Campbell (PhD, Macquarie University) is senior vice president of global content and Bible teaching at Our Daily Bread. Prior to this he taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is the author or coauthor of numerous books, including Paul and Union with Christ, winner of a Christianity Today Book Award. Campbell lives in Lyneham, Australia.

Jonathan T. Pennington (PhD, University of St. Andrews), a popular speaker, teacher, and preacher, is associate professor of New Testament interpretation and director of research doctoral studies at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is also on staff as a preaching pastor at Sojourn East Church in Louisville, Kentucky. Pennington is the host and coproducer of the popular web series Cars, Coffee, Theology and has written numerous books, including The Sermon on the Mount and Human Flourishing, Reading the Gospels Wisely, and Heaven and Earth in the Gospel of Matthew.

The God of the Old Testament: Encountering the Divine in Christian Scripture

  • Author: Walter Moberly
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Pages: 304

Old Testament theologian Walter Moberly is known for his creative, accessible, and provocative writing. This book, written in a similar vein as his well-received Old Testament Theology, combines biblical criticism with constructive theology and engages both Jewish and Christian interpretations. It demonstrates how to read the Old Testament in ways that are academically rigorous and also contribute to its use in contemporary Christian thought and practice.

Moberly offers robust readings of eight pivotal Old Testament passages that unpack the nature of God in Christian Scripture. These passages form some of the basic “grammar” of the Bible’s portrayal of God and humanity. Suitable as a supplementary text for Old Testament theology and interpretation courses, this book presents a Christian approach to reading the Old Testament that holds together the priorities of both scholarship and faith.

These graceful and pellucid essays, informed by their distinguished author’s impressive learning and his gentle and generous Christian commitments, shed precious light on what is perhaps the most important subject in the study of the scriptures—the nature of the God to whom they testify. I recommend the book highly.

—Jon D. Levenson, Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies, Harvard University

R. W. L. Moberly (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of theology and biblical interpretation at Durham University, where he has taught for more than thirty years. He is the author of numerous books, including Old Testament Theology, The Bible in a Disenchanted Age, The Theology of the Book of Genesis, and Prophecy and Discernment. He is also an ordained priest in the Church of England.

$95.99