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Products>Lexham Geographic Commentaries (6 vols.)

Lexham Geographic Commentaries (6 vols.)

  • Format:Digital

$239.99

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Lexham Geographic Commentaries

The Lexham Geographic Commentaries deliver fresh insight by drawing attention to an often overlooked component of biblical stories—their geographical setting. Geography is a central concern throughout Scripture, but the full significance of the geographical context is easily overlooked without a familiarity with the places, the relative distances, and the ancient setting. To create an innovative, award-winning commentary on the geographic and physical background of the biblical text, we partnered with noted Bible scholar and cartographer Dr. Barry J. Beitzel. This commentary will not only place you in the sandals of the ancient writers of Scripture, but it will explain the significance of the geographic details in the biblical text for your life today.

When you order this collection, all of the volumes listed below as Now Available are automatically downloaded. As forthcoming volumes are completed, they will download automatically as soon as they ship.

Praise for the Lexham Geographic Commentaries

A great number of the skills that contribute to solid biblical interpretation involve considering a text in one or another of its various contexts—linguistic, literary, historical, social, cultural, rhetorical, intertextual. But how often do we give adequate attention to the geographical and archaeological contexts of the events about which we read or the settings in which Jesus was raised, taught, acted, died, and rose again? This distinctive and clearly-focused commentary is replete with solid information about those geographical and archaeological contexts, and with connections to the Gospel texts (ranging from the secure to the suggestive, but always stimulating), that will admirably help us keep those physical contexts in view as we read, interpret, teach, and preach from the Gospels.

—David A. deSilva, Trustees’ Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek, Ashland Theological Seminary

What a resource! Whether you study the Bible, teach or preach it, or are planning to do a movie where you need to understand how people lived, the Lexham Geographic Commentary on Acts through Revelation is a treasure trove of information about first century life. This is up to date and full of detail that not only will inform you but fascinate you as well. Just very well done.

—Darrell Bock, Senior Research Professor of New Testament, Dallas Theological Seminary

Most New Testament professors are at best amateurs when it comes to geography and archaeology and for many of us the geographical information is inaccessible, but the Lexham Geographic Commentary on Acts through Revelation brings it all together. Just what Bible readers, pastors, and professors need! An abundance of images, excellent scholarly descriptions and narratives, and first-rate scholarship all bundled into an accessible format. I will not study any from Acts to Revelation without having this volume at my side.

—Rev. Canon Dr. Scot McKnight, Professor of New Testament, Northern Seminary

Product Overview

  • Title: Lexham Geographic Commentaries
  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Series: Lexham Geographic Commentaries
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Volumes: 6
Value if sold separately
||Partially included
Value if sold separately
Total value if sold separately:

Now Available

Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Gospels

  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Page Count: 600

2019 Christianity Today Book Award Winner for Biblical Studies

The Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Gospels delivers fresh insight by paying attention to an often overlooked component of the Gospel stories—their geographical setting. Many familiar Gospel narratives are filled with geographic details that we gloss over because of our distance from the Holy Land. In a world of dirt roads and dry riverbeds, where shepherds watch their flocks in the hills and fishermen mend their nets by the sea, Jesus taught from hill and plain, using the surrounding landscape as the backdrop for his teaching. Jesus’ parables and illustrations are often brimming with geographic clues, but the significance of these distinctive details is often lost on us today.

Lexham Geographic Commentary on Acts through Revelation

  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2019
  • Page Count: 512

The Lexham Geographic Commentary on Acts through Revelation delivers fresh insight by drawing attention to the geographical setting for the spread of Christianity in the first century AD. Geography is a central concern in Acts, but the full significance of its geographical context is easily overlooked without a familiarity with the places, the types of transportation, the relative distances, and the travel conditions around the Mediterranean in the first century AD. Luke’s account mentions places from all over the known world, and Paul’s missionary travels covered an estimated 15,000 miles by land and sea.

Forthcoming

Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Pentateuch

  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Estimated Publication Date: 2021

Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Historical Books, Volume 1

  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Estimated Publication Date: 2022

This volume covers the books of Joshua, Judges, and Ruth.

Lexham Geographic Commentary on the Historical Books, Volume 2

  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Estimated Publication Date: 2022

This volume covers the books of 1–2 Samuel, 1–2 Kings, 1–2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther.

Lexham Geographic Commentary on Poetry and Prophecy

  • Editor: Barry J. Beitzel
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Estimated Publication Date: 2023

About the Editor

Barry J. Beitzel is Professor Emeritus of Old Testament and Semitic Languages at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois, USA. He holds a Ph.D. in Ancient Near Eastern Studies from Dropsie University in Philadelphia. He obtained a postdoctorate in Ancient Near Eastern Geography from the Université de Liège, Belgium, and has engaged in postdoctoral archaeological work through UCLA in eastern Syria. Dr. Beitzel is the author of The New Moody Atlas of the Bible. His publications on Near Eastern geography have appeared in a variety of monographs and journals, from Biblical Archaeology Review and The Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research to Iraq: The British Institute for the Study of Iraq.

Reviews

6 ratings

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  1. bushberry

    bushberry

    3/31/2021

    22222
    The idea of focusing on geography in a Bible commentary is so unique that Lexham Geographic commentaries easily grab my attention. Before I buy, let’s just check the sample page before committing my hard earned dollars and clicking purchase. https://lexhampress.com/product/138314/lexham-geographic-commentary-on-the-gospels https://lexhampress.com/images/pagescans/138314/005.jpg https://lexhampress.com/images/pagescans/138314/006.jpg “VISIT OF THE SHEPHERDS” on pages 5 - 6 has a reference to Alfred Edersheim: The life and times of Jesus the Messiah, that should be easy to check since Edersheim’s work is public domain, freely available online. The reference is book 2 chapter 4, The nativity of Jesus the Messiah. Okay, just considering pages 5-6, this is what I observe regarding the shepherds at the Birth of Jesus Christ and the timing of Christ’s birth: • Lexham Geographic commentaries (LGC) assert that flocks are not in the open, in Bethlehem during the winter. Edersheim attributes this argument to Lightfoot. LGC does not attribute their source of this argument. • The reason given by LGC is that temperatures are in the low 50s F and can drop below freezing. This is not a sufficient answer because adult sheep are comfortable in these temperatures. More explanation is needed, such whether lambing was happening in winter? • Edersheim refers to source material which LGC does not mention: 1. Mishan, Baba K.80a Flocks were either in the wilderness or they were those for the Temple-services. The keeping of non-temple-service flocks was prohibited in Israel except in the wilderness. 2. Talmud Taan 6b: That the flocks not outside in winter are ‘the wilderness’flocks. These are distinct from the Bethlehem flocks. 3. Bezah 40a wilderness flocks do remain outside all year round. (Edersheim also lists Tosephta Beza iv6, and Jer. Bezah 63 b). • LGC mentioned Shekalim 7:4, but neglected to engage with Edersheim’s main point, that Shekalim 7:4 states that the flocks were in the field 30 days before the Passover (i.e. February). Edersheim points out that this is the time when rainfall was highest. LGC’s appeal to climate is starting to wane. • Edersheim mentions that 9th Tebheth is a Jewish fast day of unknown reason. 9th Tebheth has coincided with 25th December many times (Megillath Taanith ed. Warsh p.20a. and Zunz, Ritus d. Synag. Gottesd. P.126). • Edersheim makes his case. Note these points: Only flocks for Temple-services were in Bethlehem. Ordinary Shepherds were banned from Rabbinism. Edersheim’s Conclusion: These were not ordinary shepherds. On this point LGC says it is “often supposed” that the shepherds were more ritually clean. Who often supposes this? Edershiem’s ideas may imply this but he has not stated this, it is simply the corollary of the facts he has presented. To challenge this conclusion we need to question Edersheim’s claim that ordinary Shepherds were banned from Rabbinism, but LGC has not pursued this. LGC also says it is “theologically tempting to associate his birth with shepherds who were already connected to the ritual of the temple…” But we can also say that it is theologically tempting to hold the view which LGC has taken, which associates Christ’s birth with ordinary shepherds, i.e. that Christ humbles himself to be viewed by ordinary humble unclean folk. LGC has implied that their perspective rests on facts and the `ritually clean’ shepherd idea is only speculative theology. LGC’s position is speculative (i.e. that sheep don’t stay outside in winter) and LGC has disregarded Edersheim’s use of historical fact from source documents which address their position, all the while implying that the position Edersheim represents is just theological speculation. • What is the relevance of this? If LGC is right, then December 25 is unrelated to Christ’s birth and so the Christmas tradition is detached from historical reality, and Christians have been deceiving themselves about Dec 25. If Edersheim is right then the traditional Christmas date of December 25 closely represents the day of Christ’s birth, and so the tradition of Christmas is founded in historical truth, and has retained this truth through the millennia. Quite a lot just from a quick view of a couple of sample pages: • Lacks engagement with content of reference • Lack of engagement with an alternative perspective • Dismissive claims about the opposing perspective e.g. “this can in no way be proven,” This sentence is wrong. There is a way. An historical text stating that Levites raised the temple sacrifices would be proof. That we don’t have this degree of proof is different than saying it cannot be proven. • Disregard for source material • Does not examine weaknesses in own perspective (i.e. the real possibility of shepherding in winter). The geographical aspects of this work seem quite helpful but not so for the historical treatment, if this small section of just two pages is any indication of what lies in the volumes.
    Reply

  2. Dr. Anthony Mazak
  3. Stephanus Karnadhi
    Thank you for pointing that to us, Terry Thomson. With limited budget, we want to get resources that we can use now, not next year nor even further in the future. Hopefully they would release individual title, so we get the one we can use rightaway.
    Reply

  4. Terry Thompson
    Look out! This is one of those buy two now, get four later deals. As many of you know, this is produced by the same publisher as the Evangelical Exegetical Commentaries (EEC) which was originally offered for sale as early as 2010 and still has less than 1/3 of its titles published (13 of 44) eleven (11) years later despite promises to purchasers to produce earlier. Please note that the FOUR unpublished, forthcoming books are scheduled for release as follows: Pentateuch. 2021 Historical Books, vol 1. 2022 Historical Books, vol 2. 2022 Poetry & Prophecy. 2023 Please note these four titles do not even have a list price yet; they have not yet been written. They are in development. Just letting you know so there are no bad feelings if there are several years out before they are actually released. I have the two available copies and they are EXCELLENT. WHEN the new titles are released I'm sure they will also be EXCELLENT! Just want you to be able to temper your expectations.
    Reply

  5. Henry Braun

    Henry Braun

    9/22/2020

    55555
    I love the one on the gospels. Up to this point I have not consulted the one on Acts-Rev. Looking forward to the OT-volumes.
    Reply

  6. Joe Marshall

    Joe Marshall

    2/18/2020

    55555
  7. J-P O

    J-P O

    2/13/2020

    55555
  8. Ariel Berkowitz

    Ariel Berkowitz

    12/13/2019

    Great entries written by reliable scholars, some of whom I know personally. A must purchase for any serious Bible student. Thankful for this series and cannot wait to purchase the rest (I already have the first 2!) Ariel Berkowitz
    Reply

  9. René Dlouhý

    René Dlouhý

    12/12/2019

    55555
  10. Charles Savelle

    Charles Savelle

    12/12/2019

    I already have the first two and the rest are forthcoming. I purchased the EEC around 8 years ago and am still waiting for the majority of the volumes. Fool me once . . .
    Reply

  11. Brian Poad

    Brian Poad

    12/7/2019

    I already own the first two, so excited they are also doing the Old Testament. I wonder about the price also. still worth it!
    Reply

  12. Michel Pauw

    Michel Pauw

    11/19/2019

    The first two volumes are part of a larger bundle. You can also wait till the whole collection will become part of a larger bundle. Then the discount will be more.
    Reply

  13. Larry Craig

    Larry Craig

    11/18/2019

    I already own 2 of these. Assuming all volumes are the same price, the regular price would be $120, and my discount is a little over 20%. Not a big deal, but at first glance I might think I'm saving 50%. I wish I wouldn't have to double check everything.
    Reply

$239.99

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