Faithlife Corporation

Business Hours

Monday – Saturday
6 AM – 6 PM PST
Local: 3:58 PM
Fathers of the Church: Mediaeval Continuation (2 vols.)
This image is for illustration only. The product is a download.

Fathers of the Church: Mediaeval Continuation (2 vols.)

by ,

Catholic University of America 2016–2017

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$67.99

Overview

Neglected for years as a stagnant period in philosophy and theology, recent scholarship has revealed the Middle Ages to be as intellectually dynamic as any. Covering the most significant Christian writers from the eleventh to the fourteenth centuries, this collection provides insight into the development of Scholasticism, various heresies and ecclesiastical issues, and the complexities of emerging ethnocentrism. These volumes will help fill the gap in medieval scholarship that exists in many libraries, providing valuable insight into Christianity’s continued development and massive influence in European history.

With Logos Bible Software, these valuable volumes are enhanced by cutting-edge research tools. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Tablet and mobile apps let you take the discussion with you. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Provides contemporary scholarship on an often neglected period
  • Explores Christianity’s continued development and influence in the High Middle Ages

Product Details

Individual Titles

On the Body of the Lord

  • Author: Albert the Great
  • Translator: Sr. Albert Marie Surmanski, OP
  • Series: Fathers of the Church: Mediaeval Continuation
  • Publisher: Catholic University of America
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 472

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Albert the Great wrote On the Body of the Lord in the 1270s, making it his final work of sacramental theology. A companion volume to his commentary on the Mass, On the Body of the Lord is a comprehensive discussion of Eucharistic theology. The treatise is structured around six names for the Eucharist taken from the Mass: grace, gift, food, communion, sacrifice, and sacrament. It emerges from the liturgy and is intended to draw the reader back to worship.

The overall movement of the treatise follows the order of God’s wisdom. Albert begins by discussing the Eucharist as a gift flowing from the goodness of the Trinity. He touches on its relation to redemption and the Church, including a rigorous Aristotelian analysis of Eucharistic change and presence before ending with a discussion of Mass rubrics. The most significant theological emphasis is on the Eucharist as food given to feed the people of God.

The style varies to suit the content: certain sections are terse; others are devotional, allowing the reader to enter the saint's own prayer. Perhaps most characteristically Albertine is an extended meditation that compares the process of digestion to the incorporation of the Christian into the Body of Christ. The mixed style allows this work to integrate rigorous aspects of scholastic thought with a fervent love for God, making On the Body of the Lord one of Albert’s most human as well as one of his most beautiful works.

On the Body of the Lord was well received, particularly in areas that came to be influenced by the devotio moderna. By 1484, three separate Latin editions had been printed, two of which were the inaugural works on new presses. In the following century the Protestant Reformation brought an end to its popularity. On the Body of the Lord is here translated into English for the first time.

Albert the Great was a German Dominican friar and a Catholic bishop. He is often regarded as the greatest German philosopher and theologian of the Middle Ages and is honored by the Catholic Church as one of 35 Doctors of the Church.

Writings against the Saracens

  • Author: Peter the Venerable
  • Translator: Irven M. Resnick
  • Series: Fathers of the Church: Mediaeval Continuation
  • Publisher: Catholic University of America
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 192

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Robert of Arbrissel (d. 1117) once named Cluny among the chief holy places of Christendom—just after Bethlehem, Jerusalem, and Rome. When Peter the Venerable (d. 1156) became the ninth abbot of Cluny in 1122, Cluny had thousands of monks in the mother abbey and her daughter cells, along with hundreds of affiliated houses and dependencies in England, Germany, Spain, Italy and the Holy Land. As a fierce advocate for Cluny against its detractors (which included the redoubtable Bernard of Clairvaux), Peter defended his Order at the same time that he reformed its customs.

Peter the Venerable’s extensive literary legacy includes poems, a large epistolary collection, and polemical treatises. The first of his four major polemics targeted a Christian heresy, the Petrobrussians (Against the Petrobrusians); the rest took aim at Jews and Saracens. Catholic University of America Press has published his Against the Inveterate Obduracy of the Jews. This present volume will make available in their entirety Peter the Venerable’s twin polemics against Islam—A Summary of the Entire Heresy of the Saracens and Against the Sect of the Saracens—as well as related correspondence. These works resulted from a sustained engagement with Islam begun during Peter’s journey to Spain in 1142–43. There the abbot commissioned a translation of sources from the Arabic, the so-called Toledan Collection, that include the Letter of a Saracen with a Christian Response (from the Apology of [Ps.] Al-Kindi); Fables of the Saracens (a potpourri of Islamic hadith traditions); and Robert of Ketton’s first Latin translation of the whole of the Qur’an. Thanks to Peter’s efforts, from the second half of the twelfth century Christians could acquire a far better understanding of the teachings of Islam, and Peter may rightly be viewed as the initiator of Islamic studies in the West.

Peter the Venerable (1092–1156) was abbot of the Benedictine abbey of Cluny. He was born to Blessed Raingarde in Auvergne, France and has been honored as a saint, but was never fully canonized.

More details about these resources