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A History of Evangelicalism (5 vols.)
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Gathering Interest

Overview

This series seeks to integrate the social and intellectual history of a diverse yet cohesive Christian movement over the last three hundred years. The associations, books, practices, beliefs, networks of influence and prominent individuals which descended from the eighteenth-century British and North American revivals all come into view. Accessible to a wide range of readers, the volumes of the History of Evangelicalism Series provide not only factual details but also fascinating interpretations of a movement that is still influential today.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Recognized as the standard historical work on the history of Evangelicalism
  • Provides insights into the development of the evangelical movement
  • Integrates the intellectual and social history of this diverse movement into a structured historical account

Product Details

Individual Titles

The Rise of Evangelicalism: The Age of Edwards, Whitefield, and the Wesleys

  • Author: Mark A. Noll
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 316

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This inaugural book, in a series that charts the course of English-speaking evangelicalism over the last 300 years, offers a multinational narrative of the origin, development and rapid diffusion of evangelical movements in their first two generations. Theology, hymnody, gender, warfare, politics and science are all taken into consideration. But the focus is on the landmark individuals, events and organizations that shaped the story of the beginnings of this vibrant Christian movement.

The revivals in Britain and North America in the mid-eighteenth century proved to be foundational in the development of the movement, its ethos, beliefs and subsequent direction. In these revivals, the core commitments of evangelicals were formed that continue to this day. In this volume you will find the fascinating story of their formation, their strengths and their weaknesses, but always their dynamism.

This remarkable book provides an illuminating synthesis of the origins of evangelical culture. Noll travels easily across Great Britain, the European continent and North America, uncovering the intricate interplay of heroic theologians and their disciples, transformative ideas, and responsive congregants. He balances revealing examples against strikingly clear presentations of theologies within the social and political cultures of instability that included religious warfare, Atlantic exploration and settlement, and the rise of commercial capitalism. The result is a powerful narrative that envisions evangelicalism as the product of its era as well as an ascendant force that would change radically the nature of religious culture in Britain and North America.

—Marilyn J. Westerkamp, University of California, Santa Cruz

Mark A. Noll (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is Francis McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Noll's main academic interests concern the interaction of Christianity and culture in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Anglo-American societies. He has published articles and reviews on a wide variety of subjects involving Christianity in modern history. Some of his many books include The Civil War as a Theological Crisis, Is the Reformation Over?, The Rise of Evangelicalism: The Age of Edwards, Whitefield and the Wesleys, and The Old Religion in a New World.

The Expansion of Evangelicalism: The Age of Wilberforce, More, Chalmers, and Finney

  • Author: John Wolffe
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

At the beginning of the nineteenth century the village of Clapham in Surrey still enjoyed a sense of distance from the bustle of London. There the group of evangelicals who would come to be known as the Clapham Sect regularly gathered. William Wilberforce, leader of a long campaign against the slave trade, commiserated with the other inheritors of the fledgling British evangelical movement, now in its second, more politically and culturally savvy generation.

Meanwhile, evangelicalism had also taken root in much harsher social and geographical landscapes, where it was witness to much more rough-edged expressions of Christian conviction. In the bleak industrial valleys of northern England, in the mining and fishing villages of Cornwall, and on the expanding American frontier, a period of intense revivalism was leading to the rapid expansion of Methodism and other forms of popular evangelicalism. It shaped a spirituality that emphasized the transience of this world and the reality of the Christian's true security in heaven.

In The Expansion of Evangelicalism, John Wolffe provides an authoritative account of evangelicalism from the 1790s to the 1840s. Making extensive use of primary sources, Wolffe skillfully balances British and American developments, and also discusses Canada, Australia, the West Indies and other regions. He covers aspects of the movement such as spirituality and worship; the place of evangelicalism in the lives of women, men and the family; and its broader social and political effects—giving particular attention to the question of slavery.

Volume two in the acclaimed series, A History of Evangelicalism, this richly detailed, compelling book will excite history buffs, students and professors, and any reader interested in the development of evangelicalism.

This is a superb social history of the evangelical movement in the English-speaking world from 1790 to 1850. It offers a panoramic overview of the movement as a whole, as well as a series of focused snapshots of its leading personalities, institutions, spiritual qualities, corporate worship practices and social outreach efforts. Wolffe's sure hand and multiple lenses have produced an attractive album, which is both critical and compelling, of the Anglophone family of evangelicals.

—Douglas A. Sweeney, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

John Wolffe is professor of religious history at The Open University in England. He is the author and editor of a number of books.

The Dominance of Evangelicalism: The Age of Spurgeon and Moody

  • Author: David W. Bebbington
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 284

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This book continues a compelling series of books charting the course of English-speaking evangelicalism over the last three hundred years. Evangelical culture at the end of the nineteenth century is set against the backdrop of imperial maneuvering in Great Britain and populist uprisings in the United States. Meanwhile, the industrialized West begins to enjoy the fruits of the Industrial Revolution, as British and American commerce become unstoppable forces on economies worldwide.

The rising tide of respectability that accompanied the affluence of the late nineteenth century West exercised great influence over religion. The plight of those who shared little in the abundance of the period likewise stirred the Christian conscience of some, turning them ultimately toward a social gospel. Better communication, together with widespread education, meant that the latest news and novel ideas spread rapidly. Evangelicals knew what was happening among their fellow believers on the other side of the globe and were often swayed by their opinions or inspired by their schemes. Already during the later nineteenth century, evangelicalism was contributing in a major way to globalization.

Theology, hymnody, gender, warfare, politics and science are all taken into consideration in this sweeping discussion of a critical period in religious history, but the focus of The Dominance of Evangelicalism is on the landmark individuals, events and organizations that shaped the story of a high-water mark of this vibrant Christian movement.

In this new study, Bebbington reveals the extraordinary influence of 19th-century evangelicalism. His striking conclusion is . . . Evangelicals rule! The secret to evangelicalism's success lies in its distinctives.

—Timothy Larsen, Christianity Today, June 2006

David W. Bebbington (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of history at the University of Stirling in Scotland and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. His principal research interests are in the history of politics, religion, and society in Britain from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and in the history of the global evangelical movement.

The Disruption of Evangelicalism: The Age of Torrey, Mott, McPherson, and Hammond

  • Author: Geoffrey R. Treloar
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 334

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Disruption of Evangelicalism is the first comprehensive account of the evangelical tradition across the English-speaking world from the end of the nineteenth to the mid-twentieth century. It offers fresh perspectives on conversionism and the life of faith, biblical and theological perspectives, social engagement, and mission. Tracing these trajectories through a period of great turbulence in world history, we see the deepening of an evangelical diversity. And as events unfold, we notice the spectrum of evangelicalism fragments in varied and often competing strands.

Dividing the era into two phases—before 1914 and after 1918—draws out the impact of the Great War of 1914–18 as evangelicals renegotiated their identity in the modern world. By accenting his account with the careers of selected key figures, Geoffrey Treloar illustrates the very different responses of evangelicals to the demands of a critical and transitional period. The Disruption of Evangelicalism sets out a case that deserves the attention of both professional and arm-chair historians.

Geoffrey Treloar reconstructs evangelicalism's 'things fall apart' moment of the early twentieth century with learned grace. Most historians have treated the period as one of polarization within the movement, but Treloar deploys a spectrum framework that highlights the period's complexities and makes better sense of its tensions. His choice of Reuben Torrey, John R. Mott, Aimee Semple McPherson, and Thomas Chatterton Hammond as the period's emblematic figures is a particularly inspired move that will help both general readers and specialists to see evangelicalism with fresh eyes and deeper understanding.

—Michael S. Hamilton, professor and chair, department of history, Seattle Pacific University

Geoffrey R. Treloar (PhD, University of Sydney) is director of learning and teaching at the Australian College of Theology and visiting fellow in history in the School of Humanities and Languages at the University of New South Wales. He is the author or editor of numerous books, most notably Lightfoot the Historian.

The Global Diffusion of Evangelicalism: The Age of Billy Graham and John Stott

  • Author: Brian Stanley
  • Publisher: IVP
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 283

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Evangelical Christianity underwent extraordinary expansion—geographically, culturally and theologically—in the second half of the twentieth century. How and why did it spread and change so much? How did its strategic responses to a rapidly changing world affect its diffusion, for better or for worse?

This volume in the History of Evangelicalism series offers an authoritative survey of worldwide evangelicalism following the Second World War. It discusses the globalization of movements of mission, evangelism and revival, paying particular attention to the charismatic and neo-Pentecostal movements. The trends in evangelical biblical scholarship, preaching and apologetics were no less significant, including the discipline of hermeneutics in key issues. Extended treatment is given to the part played by southern-hemisphere Christianity in broadening evangelical understandings of mission.

While the role of familiar leaders such as Billy Graham, John Stott, Carl Henry, Martyn Lloyd-Jones and Festo Kivengere receives full coverage, space is also given to lesser-known figures, such as Edward Carnell, Agnes Sanford, Orlando Costas, John Gatu and John Laird. The final chapter considers whether evangelical expansion has been at the price of theological coherence and stability and discusses the phenomenon of “postevangelicalism.”

Painting a comprehensive picture of evangelicalism's development as well as narrating stories of influential individuals, events and organizations, The Global Diffusion of Evangelicalism is a stimulating and informative contribution to a valuable series.

This is an important and skillfully written book that deserves to reach a wide audience. . . . The book concludes with the question of whether global diffusion also means the global disintegration of Evangelicalism. Anyone interested in this question, which is vital to the future of the movement, should read this book.

—John Maiden, Journal of Ecclesiastical History, October 2014

Brian Stanley (PhD) is professor of world Christianity and director of the Centre for the Study of World Christianity at the University of Edinburgh School of Divinity. He is the author of The World Missionary Conference: Edinburgh 1910 and editor (with Sheridan Gilley) of volume 8 of The Cambridge History of Christianity, World Christianities, c. 1815–c. 1914.

About the Series Editors

Mark A. Noll (PhD, Vanderbilt University) is Francis McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Noll's main academic interests concern the interaction of Christianity and culture in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Anglo-American societies. He has published articles and reviews on a wide variety of subjects involving Christianity in modern history. Some of his many books include The Civil War as a Theological Crisis, Is the Reformation Over?, The Rise of Evangelicalism: The Age of Edwards, Whitefield and the Wesleys, and The Old Religion in a New World.

David W. Bebbington (PhD, University of Cambridge) is professor of history at the University of Stirling in Scotland and a fellow of the Royal Historical Society. His principal research interests are in the history of politics, religion, and society in Britain from the eighteenth to the twentieth century and in the history of the global evangelical movement.