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New Studies in Biblical Theology Upgrade (3 vols.)
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New Studies in Biblical Theology Upgrade (3 vols.)

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IVP, Apollos 2016

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Overview

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprising New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. The NSBT series is edited by D.A. Carson, aiming to simultaneously instruct and to edify, to interact with current scholarship and to point the way ahead.

In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Get all of the volumes in the New Studies in Biblical Theology series.

Key Features

  • Contains scholarly and accessible volumes intended for church and academy
  • Interacts with the best of recent research and significant literature
  • Offers new insights and challenges established positions
  • Encourages Christians to better understand their Bibles through biblical theology
  • Includes a new volume by esteemed scholar Peter T. O‘Brien

Product Details

Individual Titles

Calling on the Name of the Lord: A Biblical Theology of Prayer

  • Author: J. Gary Millar
  • Editor: D.A. Carson
  • Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology
  • Publisher: IVP UK
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 264

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

From this first mention of prayer in the Bible, right through to the end, when the church prays “Come, Lord Jesus!” (Revelation 22:20), prayer is intimately linked with the gospel—God’s promised and provided solution to the problem of human rebellion against him and its consequences.

After defining prayer simply as “calling on the name of the Lord,” Gary Millar follows the contours of the Bible’s teaching on prayer. His conviction is that even careful readers can often overlook significant material because it is deeply embedded in narrative or poetic passages where the main emphases lie elsewhere.

Millar’s initial focus is on how “calling on the name of the Lord” to deliver on his covenantal promises is the foundation for all that the Old Testament says about prayer. Moving to the New Testament, he shows how this is redefined by Jesus himself, and how, after his death and resurrection, the apostles understood “praying in the name of Jesus” to be the equivalent new covenant expression. Throughout the Bible, prayer is to be primarily understood as asking God to deliver on what he has already promised—as Calvin expressed it, “through the gospel our hearts are trained to call on God’s name” (Institutes 3.20.1).

This New Studies in Biblical Theology volume concludes his valuable study with an afterword offering pointers to application to the life of the church today.

J. Gary Millar is principal of Queensland Theological College, Australia. Previously he served as a minister in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. He is the author of Now Choose Life, coauthor of Saving Eutychus and a contributor to His Mission: Jesus in the Gospel of Luke.

God Has Spoken in His Son: A Biblical Theology of Hebrews

  • Author: Peter T. O’Brien
  • Editor: D.A. Carson
  • Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology
  • Publisher: IVP UK
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Hebrews is one of the most attractive and powerful yet challenging books of the New Testament. It begins with a magnificent presentation of Jesus as the divine Son through whom God has spoken his final word (Heb. 1:1-4). These opening lines set the trajectory for the whole discourse.

The polished literary character of Hebrews and its careful exposition of the superiority of Christ, the Son of God and great high priest led earlier generations to conclude that it was mainly or simply a theological treatise. However, particularly in the last three decades, its purpose has been understood as hortatory; this is made clear by the exhortatory passages that flow from, and are grounded in, the expositions that appear throughout the discourse.

Peter O’Brien’s excellent, cohesive exposition of Hebrews examines the major interlocking themes highlighted by the author as he addresses his “word of exhortation” (13:22) to the congregation. These themes include God speaking, Christology, salvation, the people of God, and warnings and encouragements.

In this New Studies in Biblical Theology volume, O’Brien shows how Hebrews employs profoundly rich theology to serve the didactic, hortatory and pastoral goals of urging the hearers to endure in their pursuit of the promised reward, in obedience to the word of God and especially on the basis of their new covenant relationship with the Son.

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprising New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. The NSBT series is edited by D. A. Carson, aiming to simultaneously instruct and to edify, to interact with current scholarship and to point the way ahead.

Peter T. O‘Brien is senior research fellow in New Testament at Moore Theological College in Sydney, Australia. He is well-known for his major biblical commentaries, including The Letter to the Ephesians (Pillar New Testament Commentary), The Letter to the Hebrews (Pillar New Testament Commentary), and several publications on the subject of mission.

The Book of Isaiah and God’s Kingdom: A Thematic-Theological Approach

  • Author: Andrew Abernethy
  • Editor: D.A. Carson
  • Series: New Studies in Biblical Theology
  • Publisher: IVP UK
  • Publication Date: 2016
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The book of Isaiah has nourished the church throughout the centuries. However, its massive size can be intimidating; its historical setting can seem distant, opaque, varied; its organization and composition can seem disjointed and fragmented; its abundance of terse, poetic language can make its message seem veiled—and where are those explicit prophecies about Christ? These are typical experiences for many who try to read, let alone teach or preach, through Isaiah.

Andrew Abernethy’s conviction is that thematic points of reference can be of great help in encountering Isaiah and its rich theological message. In view of what the structure of the book of Isaiah aims to emphasize, this New Studies in Biblical Theology volume employs the concept of “kingdom” as an entry point for organizing the book’s major themes. In many respects, Isaiah provides a people living amidst imperial contexts with a theological interpretation of them in the light of YHWH’s past, present and future sovereign reign.

Four features of “kingdom” frame Abernethy’s study: God, the King; the lead agents of the King; the realm of the kingdom and the people of the King. While his primary aim is to show how “kingdom” is fundamental to Isaiah when understood within its Old Testament context, interspersed canonical reflections assist those who are wrestling with how to read Isaiah as Christian Scripture in and for the church.

Andrew Abernethy is assistant professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College (IL). He is the author of Eating in Isaiah: Approaching Food and Drink in Isaiah’s Structure and Message and coeditor of Isaiah and Imperial Context: The Book of Isaiah in Times of Empire.

About D.A. Carson

D.A. Carson is one of the most renowned New Testament scholars in the world. A respected teacher, author, and speaker, he is currently research professor of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and the president of The Gospel Coalition.

Carson lectures in academic and church settings around the world, and is the author of more than 50 books, including Exegetical Fallacies, Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Gospel according to John, The Gagging of God, Showing the Spirit: A Theological Exposition of 1 Corinthians 12–14, and The Intolerance of Tolerance. He is the editor of the Pillar New Testament Commentary series, and coeditor of the Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament with G.K. Beale, and the Studies in New Testament Greek series with Stanley Porter.