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The Last Things: An Eschatology for Laymen

Publisher:
, 1978
ISBN: 9780802817273

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Overview

In recent years scriptural prophecies about the end times have become the subject of an increasing number of books. Many of these, however, are popularized accounts containing little thoughtful biblical scholarship. Yet the series studies available are often too difficult for the average reader to understand. George Eldon Ladd has endeavored to rectify this situation with a serious discussion of eschatology written for the layperson.

Two radically different interpretations of the relationship between the prophecies of the Old and New Testaments have been offered. One view sees separate programs for Israel and the Christian church, while the other recognizes progressive revelation and a unity of the Testaments.

Professor Ladd holds the latter position, basing his doctrine of the last things on the conviction that “our final word. . . is to be found in New Testament reinterpretation of Old Testament prophecy.” Only as the prophecies are seen in the light of God’s revelation through Christ can we clearly comprehend what they mean in relation to the end times.

Save more when you purchase this book as part of the Eerdmans Bible Reference Collection (5 Vols.)!

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Top Highlights

“But precisely here is our basic hermeneutic. Jesus, and the apostles after him, reinterpreted the Old Testament prophecies in light of Jesus’ person and mission. The Son of Man must appear on earth before he comes in glory, and his earthly mission was to fill the role of the Suffering Servant.” (Page 17)

“However, two things are clear. Israel must be saved in the same way as the church—by turning in faith to Jesus as their Messiah (Rom. 11:23), and the blessings which Israel will experience are blessings in Christ—the same blessings which the church has experienced.” (Page 25)

“The present writer feels that he must adopt a spiritualizing hermeneutic because he finds the New Testament applying to the spiritual church promises which in the Old Testament refer to literal Israel. He does not do this because of any preconceived covenant theology but because he is bound by the Word of God.” (Page 24)

“Here, in two separate places, prophecies which in their Old Testament context refer to literal Israel are in the New Testament applied to the (Gentile) church. In other words, Paul sees the spiritual fulfillment of Hosea 1:10 and 2:23 in the church. It follows inescapably that the salvation of the Gentile church is the fulfillment of prophecies made to Israel. Such facts as this are what compel some Bible students, including the present writer, to speak of the church as the New Israel, the true Israel, the spiritual Israel.” (Page 23)

“The first is to conclude that God has two different programs: one for Israel and one for the church.” (Page 9)

  • Title: The Last Things: An Eschatology for Laymen
  • Author: George Eldon Ladd
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 1978
  • Pages: 119

Ladd, professor of New Testament exegesis and theology at Fuller Theological Seminary since 1950, was educated at Gordon College and Gordon Divinity School (B.D.) and received the Ph.D. from Harvard University. He also did postdoctoral study at Heidelberg and Basel Universities. Ordained as an American Baptist minister, Ladd served several churches in the denomination. He was professor of Greek at Gordon College (1942-45) and head of the department of New Testament at Gordon Divinity School (1946-50). His writings include Crucial Questions about the Kingdom of God (1952), The Blessed Hope (1956), The Gospel of the Kingdom (1959), Jesus Christ and History (1963), The New Testament and Criticism (1965), The Pattern of the New Testament (1968), Commentary on The Revelation (1972) and The Theology of the New Testament (1974).

Reviews

4 ratings

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  1. Maritza

    Maritza

    12/3/2020

  2. RichThay47

    RichThay47

    11/11/2014

  3. Scott Lamb

    Scott Lamb

    4/5/2014

    George Ladd writes from the Historic Premillennialist view point and is critical of Dispensationalist views. This book gives a quick overview and goes into depth on a few subjects.
  4. Tin

    Tin

    8/2/2013

Save 25% off during the Memorial Day Sale!

$7.49

Digital list price: $12.99
Regular price: $9.99
Save $2.50 (25%)