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The Church in History Series (4 vols.)
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$88.99

Overview

The Church in History Series from St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press balances the abundance of church histories written from a Western Christian point of view. The series authors—in the unique position of being Orthodox scholars conversant with Western scholarship—have taken on the task of analyzing complicated primary sources and critiquing modern scholarly literature to guide readers through the maze of centuries of church formation and life.

This collection presents the first four volumes of the series. Veselin Kesich’s volume kicks off the series, examining the formation of the church, beginning with the earliest Christian community in Jerusalem and ending with the expansion of Christianity into various regions of the Roman Empire. Next John Meyendorff describes the expansion of Christianity in the East and the West in the fifth, sixth, and seventh centuries. The third volume is Andrew Louth’s text, which gives an account of the church in the period from the end of the Sixth Ecumenical Synod in 681 to the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. And finally, Aristeides Papadakis looks at the developments in the churches of the East and West in the High Middle Ages, particularly the rise of the papacy.

In the Logos edition, this collection is enhanced by amazing functionality. Scripture citations link directly to English translations, and important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Looking for more works on Orthodox history? Check out Select Works on Orthodox History, Part 1 and Part 2.

Key Features

  • Presents the first four volumes in Church in History Series from St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press
  • Examines the development of the church from its earliest days through AD 1453
  • Attempts to achieve a balanced approach to church history
  • Blends Orthodox and Western scholarship

Product Details

Individual Titles

Formation and Struggles, Part 1: The Birth of the Church AD 33–200

  • Author: Veselin Kesich
  • Series: The Church in History
  • Publisher: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 204

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This study of the formation of the church begins with the earliest Christian community in Jerusalem, led by Jesus’ disciples, and ends with the expansion of Christianity into various regions of the Roman Empire. Tracing the growing pains of the church from its birth through its separation from Judaism, to its struggle against Gnostic and pagan influences, the author demonstrates how early Christians deepened their loyalty to the apostolic tradition by wrestling with internal and external challenges.

The author appeals to the general reader as well as the scholar by addressing perennially popular questions: Did Jesus marry? Who was responsible for the crucifixion? What is the relationship between philosophy and theology? And how were the Scriptures compiled?

The volume concludes with teachings of the church father Irenaeus of Lyons, who presents an image of a church shaped by ministry, canon, creed, and openness to the world—a church that, by method and model, offers a solid base for growth in the following centuries.

Veselin Kesich is professor of New Testament emeritus at St Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary. He has also written The First Day of the New Creation, The Gospel Image of Christ, and The Passion of Christ.

Imperial Unity and Christian Divisions: The Church AD 450–680

  • Author: John Meyendorff
  • Series: The Church in History
  • Publisher: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 434

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Almost without exception, the “histories of the church” available in print are histories of Western Christianity, with only brief mentions of the East. This volume—the second in a planned series of six—attempts to achieve a more balanced approach. Filling the needs of students, but also of a wider readership, it describes the expansion of Christianity in the East and the West in the fifth, sixth, and seventh centuries—from Ireland to the Indian Ocean and from Germany to Nubia. It exposes the tensions which arose between the inevitable cultural pluralism and the needs of church unity—an issue which stands at the center of modern ecclesiological concerns. It discusses the debates on the identity of Christ, formally solved by the decrees of the great ecumenical councils, but which left Christendom divided. It defines the problems raised by the arbitrariness of Eastern Roman emperors and by the gradual development of Roman primacy.

John Meyendorff (1926–1992) was a longtime professor and dean of St Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary. He studied at the St. Sergius Orthodox Theological Institute in Paris, as well as at the Sorbonne. Ordained to the priesthood of the Orthodox Church in 1959, he moved to the United States, where he taught church history and patristics at St. Vladimir’s. He also taught at Harvard University, Dumbarton Oaks, Fordham University, Columbia University, and Union Theological Seminary. He also wrote The Orthodox Church, A Study of Gregory Palamas, and numerous other scholarly works.

Greek East and Latin West: The Church AD 681–1071

  • Author: Andrew Louth
  • Series: The Church in History
  • Publisher: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 382

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume gives an account of the Church in the period from the end of the Sixth Ecumenical Synod in 681 to the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. Although “Greek East” and “Latin West” are becoming distinct entities during this expanse of time, the author treats them in parallel, observing the points at which their destinies coincide or conflict and noting developments within the whole of the Church rather than striving simply, or even primarily, to explain the eventual schism between Eastern and Western Christendom.

Covering events both unique to each part (the Iconoclastic controversy in the East and the rise of the Carolingian Empire in the West) and common to each part (monastic reform, renaissance, and mission) the author skillfully portrays two Christian civilizations that share much in common yet become increasingly incomprehensible to one another. Despite curious synchronisms between East and West, the author demonstrates how two paths diverged from a once common route, and how eventually Byzantine Orthodoxy defined the Greek East over against the Latin West in theological, religious, cultural, and political terms.

Andrew Louth is the general editor of the Church in History series. He is also emeritus professor of patristic and Byzantine studies at Durham University.

The Christian East and the Rise of the Papacy: The Church AD 1071–1453

  • Author: Aristeides Papadakis and John Meyendorff
  • Series: The Church in History
  • Publisher: St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 424

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume examines developments in the churches of the East and the West in the High Middle Ages, including major Western movements such as the reform papacy, the crusades, and scholasticism, and their impact on the Eastern Church. Concurrently, the author explores the theological and spiritual tides that spread from Byzantium to the northern regions of the Balkans and Rus’, and lastly recounts the stories of the native churches of Egypt, Ethiopia, Syria, Armenia, and Georgia.

Through careful analysis, this volume exposes many factors that contributed to Christian disunity in the Middle Ages and that made attempts at reunion between the two halves of Christendom fail. Therefore, this work challenges and stimulates not only church historians but also all Christians concerned with the root causes of disunity in the Body of Christ.

Aristeides Papadakis is professor of Byzantine history emeritus at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. He is also author of Crisis in Byzantium: The Filioque Controversy in the Patraiarchate of Gregory II of Cyprus (1283–1289).