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T&T Clark Old Testament in the New Testament Collection (15 vols.)
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Overview

Dig deep into how the New Testament uses the Old with these works from the Library of New Testament Studies (LNTS). This series offers cutting-edge work for a readership of scholars, teachers, and students. All the diverse aspects of New Testament study are represented—including innovative work from historical perspectives, studies using social-scientific and literary theory, and developing theological, cultural, and contextual approaches.

More than mere overview, these specific examinations help instill a deep understanding of larger themes. Get comprehensive scholarly coverage of exciting issues, as G.K. Beale and Steve Moyise present contrasting viewpoints of the Old Testament in Revelation, Brian Abasciano looks at how Paul draws on the Old Testament in Romans 9, and much more.

In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Examines specific issues in the New Testament’s use of the Old Testament
  • Explores historical, social-scientific, literary, theological, and contextual perspectives
  • Gathers important research from several influential New Testament scholars

Product Details

Individual Titles

Genesis in the New Testament

  • Editors: Maarten J.J. Menken, Steve Moyise
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 200

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Genesis in the New Testament brings together a set of specially commissioned studies by experts in the field. After an introductory chapter on the use of Genesis in the Dead Sea Scrolls and second temple literature, each of the New Testament books that contain quotations from Genesis are discussed: Matthew, Mark, Luke-Acts, John, Paul, Deutero-Paul, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter and Jude, Revelation.

The book provides an overview of the status, role and function of Genesis in the first century. It considers the Greek and Hebrew manuscript traditions and offers insights into the various hermeneutical stances of the New Testament authors and the development of New Testament theology. The book follows on from acclaimed volumes considering Isaiah, Deuteronomy and the Minor Prophets in a similar manner.

Maarten J. J. Menken is professor of New Testament exegesis on the faculty of Catholic theology at the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. He is also the coauthor of Psalms in the New Testament.

Steve Moyise is visiting professor at Newman University, UK, and author of Jesus and Scripture, The Old Testament in the New, and Paul and Scripture.

Reading Ecclesiastes Intertextually

  • Editors: Katharine Dell, Will Kynes
  • Series: The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 288

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume continues the study of intertextuality in Wisdom Literature initiated in Reading Job Intertextually. Like that book, Reading Ecclesiastes Intertextually provides the first comprehensive treatment of intertextuality in this wisdom text. Articles address intertextual resonances between Ecclesiastes and texts across the Hebrew canon, along with texts throughout history, from Greek classical literature to the New Testament, Jewish and Christian interpretation, and existential and Modern philosophy.

Gathering together scholars with expertise on this diverse array of texts, this volume provides exegetical insight that exceeds any similar attempt by a single author. The contributors have been encouraged to pursue the intertextual approach that best suits their topic, thereby offering readers a valuable collection of intertextual case studies addressing a single text.

Katharine Dell is senior lecturer at the faculty of divinity, Cambridge University, and fellow of St. Catharine's College, Oxford. She is the author of The Book of Job as Sceptical Literature and the coeditor of Reading Job Intertextually.

Will Kynes is departmental lecturer in Old Testament studies at St Peter’s College, University of Oxford, and Liddon Research Fellow and Tutor of Theology at Keble College, Oxford. He is the author of My Psalm Has Turned into Weeping: Job’s Dialogue with the Psalms and the coeditor of Reading Job Intertextually.

The Elijah-Elisha Narrative in the Composition of Luke

  • Editors: John S. Kloppenborg, Joseph Verheyden
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 184

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This collection examines the allusions to the Elijah-Elisha narrative in the gospel of Luke. The volume presents the case for a “maximalist” view, which holds that the Elijah-Elisha narrative had a dominant role in the composition of Luke 7 and 9. This volume provides fascinating insights into the composition of the gospel of Luke, and the editorial processes involved in creating it. Contributors cover different approaches to the text, including issues of intertextuality and rhetorical-critical examinations.

John S. Kloppenborg is professor and chair of the department for the study of religion at the University of Toronto. He is the author of Excavating Q: The History and Setting of the Sayings Gospel and Associations in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook, and coeditor of Apocalypticism, Anti-Semitism and the Historical Jesus: Subtexts in Criticism.

The Followers of Jesus as the ‘Servant’: Luke’s Model from Isaiah for the Disciples in Luke-Acts

  • Author: Holly Beers
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Name
  • Publication Date: T&T Clark
  • Pages: 232

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Luke models his portrayal of Jesus and his disciples in Luke-Acts after the human agent of the “New Exodus” in Isaiah 40–66, the servant. In the Isaianic New Exodus, the servant is integral to the restoration. The servant’s mission being embodied is, to a great extent, how the New Exodus comes to fruition.

This work argues that Luke sees Jesus fulfilling the servant role in an ultimate sense, but that his followers, modelled after him in Acts, also embody it. This can be seen in Luke’s use of Isaianic servant imagery, including suffering, lack of violent response (to unjust treatment), and language in the disciples’ characterization.

Holly Beers is instructor of religious studies at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, California.

Characterizing Jesus: A Rhetorical Analysis on the Fourth Gospel’s Use of Scripture in its Presentation of Jesus

  • Author: Alicia D. Myers
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 256

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Alicia Myers explores how the fourth Gospel’s use of Scripture contributes to its characterization of Jesus. Utilizing literary-rhetorical criticism, Myers approaches the Gospel in its final form, paying particular attention to how Greco-Roman rhetoric can assist in understanding the ways in which Scripture is employed to support the presentation of Jesus. It offers further evidence in favor of the Gospel’s use of rhetoric, and gives scholars a new way to use rhetoric to better understand the use of Scripture in the fourth Gospel and the New Testament as a whole. Myers contends that the pervasive presence of Scripture in quotations, allusions, and references acts as corroborating evidence supporting the evangelist’s presentation of Jesus.

Alicia D. Myers is assistant professor of New Testament at United Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio.

Paul, Scribe of Old and New Intertextual Insights for the Jesus-Paul Debate

  • Author: Yongbom Lee
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 224

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In this study, Yongbom Lee reexamines the Jesus-Paul debate with insights from current studies on intertextuality in Paul. Lee identifies Paul’s typical ways of handling authoritative traditions in a number of cases providing a set of expectations as to how his use of them elsewhere might look.

Lee begins by investigating the use of the Scriptures in the Rule of the Community and the Damascus Document. He then examines five cases of Paul’s use of the Scriptures and contemporary Jewish exegetical traditions and three cases of his use of the Jesus tradition. Despite the skepticism concerning Paul’s knowledge and appreciation of the Jesus tradition, the fact that his use of the Jesus tradition is similar to that of the Scriptures and contemporary Jewish exegetical traditions—with respect to its presumption of authority, various citation methods, and its creative application to the situation of his readers—provides the evidence for its importance to him.

Yongbom Lee is the English ministry pastor at Los Angeles Antioch Presbyterian Church and is an adjunct professor at Fuller Theological Seminary. He also teaches at Central Baptist Theological Seminary, Azusa Pacific University, and Bethesda University of California.

The Torah in the Ethics of Paul

  • Editor: Martin Meiser
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 168

The relationship between Paul and Torah is often discussed in terms of Paul’s theology of salvation. However it is also important in Pauline ethics. Whilst some scholars dismiss this because of a paucity of Old Testament quotations in Paul, others hint at the consensus between Paul and early Jewish tradition concerning the content of single commands. Each of these positions holds consequences for describing the relationship between Paul and Judaism in general.

In order to clarify the discussion the contributors to this volume distinguish strictly between various levels of Pauline theology: the correspondence of single demands within Pauline and early Jewish ethics concerning the content, the rationale of these single demands in comparison, and the general hermeneutic basis of ethics. This is done in the context of essays on the key Pauline passages pertaining to the debate. As such this volume presents an up-to-date window into the current European debate surrounding Paul, Torah, and Ethics—and into the state of discussion surrounding Paul’s place within Judaism.

Martin Meiser is professor of theology at the University of the Saarland, Germany.

Paul and Judaism: Crosscurrents in Pauline Exegesis and the Study of Jewish-Christian Relations

  • Editors: Reimund Bieringer, Didier Pollefeyt
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 272

The New Perspective on Paul acquitted first-century Judaism of the accusation that it was a religion based on works of righteousness. Reactions to the New Perspective, both positive and critical, reflect a more fundamental problem in the reception of this paradigm: the question of continuity and discontinuity between Judaism and Christianity and its assumed implications for Jewish-Christian dialogue. A second key problem revolves around Paul’s understanding of salvation as exclusive, inclusive, or pluralist.

The contributions in the present volume represent at various approaches that can be plotted along this axis, considering Paul’s theology in its Jewish context. William S. Campbell and Thomas R. Blanton consider Paul’s covenantal theology, Michael Bachman provides an exegetical study of Paul, Israel, and the Gentiles, and Mark D. Nanos considers Paul and Torah. After this chapters by Philip A. Cunningham, John T. Pawlikowski, Hans-Joachim Sander, and Hans-Herman Henrix give particular weight to questions of Jewish-Christian dialogue. The book finishes with an epilogue by pioneer of the New Perspective James D.G. Dunn.

Reimund Bieringer is professor of New Testament at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.

Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9:1–9: An Intertextual and Theological Exegesis

  • Author: Brian J. Abasciano
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark International
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Pages: 280

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This investigation builds upon recent developments in the study of Paul’s use of Scripture that center around the concept of intertextuality. Brian Abasciano incorporates a thorough traditional exegesis and comprehensive analysis of Paul’s use of Scripture. This is set against the background of interpretive traditions surrounding the texts alluded to, with great emphasis placed on analyzing the original contexts of Paul’s citations and allusions. Such an intertextual exegesis is conducted in Romans 9:1–9 with an awareness of the broader unit of chapters 9–11 especially, as well as the epistle as a whole.

Abasciano finds that many of the themes Paul deals with in Romans 9–11 are also present in ancient Jewish and Christian interpretive traditions surrounding the passages he invokes, and more importantly, that Paul’s scriptural quotations and allusions function as pointers to their broad original contexts, from which he developed much of the form, content, and direction of his argument, holding significance for a number of exegetical details as well as broader themes and rhetorical movements. The final chapter draws conclusions concerning the significance of Paul’s use of the Old Testament in Romans 9:1–9 for the exegesis and theology of Romans and for Pauline intertextuality. The identity of the true people of God is central to Romans 9–11 and the epistle. And Paul’s use of Scripture is contextual and referential, calling for attention to Pauline intertextuality in standard exegetical procedure.

Brian J. Abasciano earned his PhD in divinity from the University of Aberdeen, pastors at Faith Community Church in Hampton, New Hampshire, and serves as an adjunct professor of New Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9:10–18: An Intertextual and Theological Exegesis

  • Author: Brian J. Abasciano
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark International
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 272

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Brian Abasciano continues his project examining the use of the Old Testament in Romans 9. Abasciano builds upon his work in Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in Romans 9.1–9, continuing the project begun in that volume and its intertextual methodology. This method incorporates into a thorough traditional exegesis a comprehensive analysis of Paul’s use of Scripture against the background of interpretive traditions surrounding the texts alluded to, with great emphasis placed on analyzing the original contexts of Paul's citations and allusions. Such an intertextual exegesis is conducted in Romans 9:10–33 with an awareness of the broader unit of chapters 9–11 especially, and also the epistle as a whole. Conclusions for the meaning of these passages and their theological significance are drawn.

Brian J. Abasciano earned his PhD in divinity from the University of Aberdeen, pastors at Faith Community Church in Hampton, New Hampshire, and serves as an adjunct professor of New Testament at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary.

Swimming in the Sea of Scripture: Paul’s Use of the Old Testament in 2 Corinthians 4:7–13:13

  • Author: Paul Han
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 224

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Examining the appropriation of Scripture in 2 Corinthians 4–13, Paul Han argues that the apostle is not only aware of the original contexts of the passages he refers to, but also goes beyond the immediate contexts and brings in the larger context of the Old Testament.

In the course of adapting the Scripture, necessary changes of referent occur and Paul appears to use the method of identification in reading the Old Testament. Whether it is Paul himself, the Corinthians, or the opponents, various kinds of identification take place with the scriptural writers and the characters mentioned in it. This identification extends even to the point of identifying the Corinthians with the Servant of Isaiah, Jesus and God. From this it is suggested that there is a concept of ‘corporate identity’ present throughout the chapters, which is also seen in the Old Testament.

In many cases Paul’s basic thrust is sufficiently clear even without any understanding of scriptural references he makes. This is because Paul often makes a rhetorical use of the Scripture by citing a text at climactic points or near the closing of a section he is developing to strengthen his points, even as he brings in the ‘big picture’ of the Old Testament.

Paul Han earned his PhD from the London School of Theology.

Paul and Isaiah’s Servants: Paul’s Theological Reading of Isaiah 40–66 in 2 Corinthians 5:14–6:10

  • Author: Mark Gignilliat
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies)
  • Publisher: T&T Clark International
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 212

Paul’s reading of the Old Testament continues to witness to the significance of reading the Old Testament in a Christian way. This study argues that a theological approach to understanding Paul’s appeal to and reading of the Old Testament, especially Isaiah, offers important insights into the ways in which Christians should read the Old Testament and a two-testament canon today. By way of example, this study explores the ways in which Isaiah 40–66’s canonical form presents the gospel in miniature with its movement from Israel to Servant to servants. It is subsequently argued that Paul follows this literary movement in his own theological reflection in 2 Corinthians 5:14–6:10.

Jesus takes on the unique role and identity of the Servant of Isaiah 40–55, and Paul takes on the role of the servants of the Servant in Isaiah 53–66. From this exegetical exploration conclusions are drawn in the final chapter that seek to apply a term from the history of interpretation to Paul’s reading, that is, the plain sense of Scripture. What does an appeal to plain sense broker? And does Paul’s reading of the Old Testament look anything like a plain sense reading? Gignilliat concludes that Paul is reading the Old Testament in such a way that the literal sense and its figural potential and capacity are not divorced but are actually organically linked in what can be termed a plain sense reading.

Mark Gignilliat is assistant professor of divinity at Beeson Divinity School, Samford University. He is the author of Paul and Isaiah’s Servants: Paul’s Theological Reading of Isaiah 40–66 in 2 Corinthians 5:14–6:10 and A Brief History of Old Testament Criticism: From Benedict Spinoza to Brevard Childs.

Written To Serve: The Use of Scripture in 1 Peter

  • Author: Benjamin Sargent
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 240

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The use of Scripture in 1 Peter has been subject to much extensive analysis in the last 30 years. In Written to Serve, Benjamin Sargent offers an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of how 1 Pet 1:10–12 offers a hermeneutic, providing an insight into how Scripture is interpreted in the letter. Sargent also argues that the relation of 1:10–12 has been misunderstood. Rather than offering a Christological hermeneutic with a focus on the suffering and glories of Christ, Sargent asserts that the primary importance of 1:10–12 is its orientation of the prophetic witness towards the eschatological community as an act of service. Similarly, rather than offering a theological narrative of continuity between Israel and Christian communities, 1:10–12 may be seen to suggest a narrative of profound discontinuity in which the community in the present is elevated above God’s people of the past.

Benjamin Sargent is research fellow at Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, and the author of Day By Day:The Rhythm of the Bible in the Book of Common Prayer.

The Old Testament in the Book of Revelation

  • Author: Steve Moyise
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 173

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Steve Moyise explores the relationship between the new context that John provides for his allusions and their context in the Old Testament. For example, did John choose texts to meet the needs of the recipients or did his meditation on the scriptures give him a unique insight into their situation? Other scholars have held that local knowledge led to John’s choice of texts or that Revelation is a midrash on Daniel. Moyise argues these theories are one-sided, as a study of John’s use of Ezekiel shows.

John based a number of his incidents on Ezekiel, in much the same order. Nevertheless, there are also major discontinuities, such as his denial of the very thing—the temple—that Ezekiel 40–48 is all about. To do justice to John’s use of the Old Testament requires an interactive model, which involves the use of scripture at Qumran and the concept of intertextuality. Moyise shows John to be a master of combining and juxtaposing images.

Steve Moyise is professor of New Testament at the University of Chichester. An international authority on the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament, Moyise is the author of Jesus and Scripture, The Old Testament in the New, and Paul and Scripture.

John’s Use of the Old Testament in Revelation

  • Author: G.K. Beale
  • Series: The Library of New Testament Studies
  • Publisher: Sheffield Academic Press
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 443

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

G.K. Beale explores the variety of ways John contextually uses the Old Testament in the Apocalypse. The introduction surveys and evaluates recent studies, which have been divided over the issue of whether or not John uses the Old Testament with sensitivity to its original literary context. The remainder of the book looks at various ways in which John uses the Old Testament and argues that there is a reciprocal interpretative relationship between the Old Testament and the Apocalypse.

G.K. Beale is currently a professor of New Testament and biblical theology at Westminster Theological Seminary. He has made a number of contributions to conservative Biblical hermeneutics, particularly in the area of the use of the Old Testament in the New Testament. He is the author of A New Testament Biblical Theology: The Unfolding of the Old Testament in the New, Handbook on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament: Exegesis and Interpretation, and The Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts?: Essays on the Use of the Old Testament in the New. He served as the president of the Evangelical Theological Society in 2004.