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No Other God: A Response to Open Theism
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No Other God: A Response to Open Theism

by

P&R 2001

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$12.99

Overview

Using ideas developed in The Doctrine of God as a theological basis, Frame provides a biblical analysis and critique of the “open theist” movement, which is shaking the church today by challenging the Reformed doctrines of God’s sovereignty, foreknowledge, and providence. In this timely work, Frame clearly describes open theism and evaluates it biblically. He addresses such questions as “How do open theists read the Bible?” “Is love God’s most important attribute?” “Is God’s will the ultimate explanation of everything?” “Do we have genuine freedom?” “Is God ever weak or changeable?” “Does God know everything in advance?” Frame not only answers the objections of open theists, he also sharpens our understanding of the relationship between God’s eternal plan and the decisions and events of our lives.

In the Logos edition of this volume, you get easy access to Scripture texts and to a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Hovering over Scripture references links you instantly to the verse you’re looking for, and with passage guides, word studies, and a wealth of other tools from Logos, you can delve into God’s Word like never before!

Key Features

  • Analyzes the open theism movement from a Reformed viewpoint
  • Provides an introduction to the concepts of open theism
  • Aims to answer questions raised by open theism on God and other topics

Contents

  • What Is Open Theism?
  • Where Does Open Theism Come From?
  • How Do Open Theists Read the Bible?
  • Is Love God’s Most Important Attribute
  • Is God’s Will the Ultimate Explanation of Everything?
  • How Do Open Theists Reply?
  • Is God’s Will Irresistible?
  • Do We Have Genuine Freedom?
  • Is God in Time?
  • Does God Change?
  • Does God Suffer?
  • Does God Know Everything in Advance?
  • Is Open Theism Consistent with Other Biblical Doctrines?

Praise for the Print Edition

Open theism is bad news. The appearance of this book is good news. Precisely because God is closed and not open to the nullification of his purposes (Job 42:2), he has opened a future for believers that is utterly secure no matter what we suffer. The key that would open the defeat of God is eternally closed within the praiseworthy vault of His precious sovereignty. John Frame delights to show when it is good to be closed and when it is good to be open. And the Bible is his criterion.

John Piper, pastor, Bethlehem Baptist Church

This book is something both to read and to give away . . . both needed and effective.

D.A. Carson, research professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

Here one will see vividly so much that is wrong with open theism while encountering afresh the beauty and glory of the true and living God of the Bible.

Bruce A. Ware, professor of Christian theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

A convincing . . . biblical case for a God whose sovereignty is something not to be avoided but cherished.

William Edgar, professor of apologetics, Westminster Theological Seminary

A devastating critique of the concept of human freedom as articulated in the “open theistic” view.

Roger R. Nicole, professor of theology, emeritus, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando

Product Details

  • Title: No Other God: A Response to Open Theism
  • Author: John M. Frame
  • Publisher: P & R
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 235
  • Christian Group: Reformed
  • Resource Type: Topical
  • Topic: Philosophical Theology

About John M. Frame

John M. Frame (MDiv, Westminster Theological Seminary, MPhil, Yale University, DD, Belhaven College) is professor of systematic theology and philosophy at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, Florida. He is an ordained minister of the Presbyterian Church in America. Previously, he taught at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia (1968–80) and Westminster Theological Seminary in California (1980–2000).

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