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St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh
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St. Bernard of Clairvaux’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh

by

SPCK, Macmillan Co. 1920

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$14.99

Overview

Written before the Synod of Kells met in 1152, Bernard of Clairvaux’s biography of Malachy of Armagh covers Malachy’s entire spirit-filled life, from boyhood to his canonization. Before the English translation of St. Bernard’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh, translator H.J. Lawlor provides an in-depth, 60+ page introduction to the state of the Irish Church during the time of St. Malachy’s life, a time he calls “a Reformation, though it might perhaps be more accurately described as an ecclesiastical revolution.” Also included with this volume are various letters and two sermons from St. Bernard.

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Presents a biography of Saint Malachy of Armagh
  • Includes an extensive introduction to the state of the Irish Church in the early twelfth century
  • Provides insight into the Middle Ages

Praise for the Print Edition

Dr. Lawlor has given us a delightful translation of St. Bernard’s Life of St. Malachy of Armagh. His introduction and annotations admit us to an intimate view of the Church of Ireland in the most critical period of her history.

Church Quarterly Review

Product Details

About the Author

Bernard of Clairvaux O. Cist (1090–1153) was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian order. After his mother’s death, he sought admission into the Cistercian order. Three years later, he was sent to found a new abbey at an isolated clearing in a glen known as the Val d’Absinthe, about 15 kilometers southeast of Bar-sur-Aube. According to tradition, Bernard founded the monastery on June 25, 1115, naming it Claire Vallée, which evolved into Clairvaux.

About the Translator

Hugh Jackson Lawlor (1860–1938) was professor of ecclesiastical history at the University of Dublin and was also an Anglican dean. He was the author and translator of numerous books, including Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea, The Heresy of the Phrygians, and A Fresh Authority for the Synod of Kells, 1152.