Products>BDAG Bibliography Expansion: Ancient Texts (8 vols.)

BDAG Bibliography Expansion: Ancient Texts (8 vols.)

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Collection value: $69.92
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Overview

BDAG Bibliography Expansion: Ancient Texts (8 vols.) includes tools for studying ancient Greek texts that are important and relevant to biblical studies and new Testament Lexicography. Additionally, these are the editors of the standard Greek-English lexicon for the New Testament considered important for studying New testament vocabulary. The third edition of A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, when it was published nearly 20 years ago, represented a watershed moment for New Testament studies. When these new books ship, we plan on also updating BDAG with links to these new volumes. Users who already have BDAG in their digital library will then be able to open them directly from the citations in their lexicon.

The most well-known change was Danker’s inclusion of extended definitions. But sometimes what does not change in a new edition is as important as those that did. BDAG is also famous (and some would say “infamous”!) for the vast quantity of its citation of secondary literature. Frederick Danker, himself, believed that these citations of the secondary literature were essential for students and scholars alike. Heeding Danker’s position, all of the BDAG Bibliography Expansions aim to make it easier for contemporary students and scholars to benefit from the knowledge of the past that is so often cited in pages of BDAG.

This collection does not include BDAG. Enhance your study of Biblical Greek with A Greek–English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature, 3rd ed. (BDAG)

  • Includes several important editions of ancient texts, both literary and documentary
  • Provides introductory textbooks for helping scholars and students best study Greek documentary materials
  • Expands the usefulness of BDAG for research and study
It is scarcely a mark of scholarly responsibility to excise what one has not first examined in detail for the light that Bauer must have determined a certain scholar had shed on matters discussed in a given entry. Besides, it is poor manners to misapply Matt 20:1-16 and profit from the gains of those who toiled in an earlier time, only unceremoniously to cut them off from memory. “Mortui etiam sentiunt” Swathe-cutters are honor-bound first to examine carefully all such bibliographical entries and excise primarily that which merely repeats previous discussions or has been totally superseded. If, indeed, much of the secondary literature cited by Bauer and deemed otiose was noted in commentaries, that would be an achievement warmly to be greeted, but such is not the case. At one point I was about to chop out a clump of twenty or more titles, but could not find one depository that took account of more than a third. So much for commentary backup!

—Frederick W. Danker in Biblical Greek Language and Lexicography: Essays in Honor of Frederick W. Danker

A further consideration relating to the generous citation of secondary literature is the fact that a given user of the lexicon may be able to locate at least something for further study, given varying personal or institutional bibliographic resources. On the whole, the abundant secondary literature provides the reader with a buffer against “private interpretations” and offers protective ointment against the disease of thinking that knowledge begins with the current generation.

—Frederick W. Danker in Biblical Greek Language and Lexicography: Essays in Honor of Frederick W. Danker

One of the most valuable incidental features of BAGD is the bibliographical data found at the end of many of the articles. Enterprising use of the entries cited will open the door to a vast treasure trove of critical monographs, dissertations, and journal articles, as well as pages and chapters in significant books. If the subject is soteriology, a look at ἀπολύτρωσις, σῴζω, and σταυρός will yield more than twenty-five titles.

—Frederick W. Danker in Multi-Purpose Tools for Bible Study

Few people ever use BDAG to its fullest potential. Just looking for translation glosses barely scratches the surface of the information in BDAG.

—Rodney Decker in An Introduction to the Bauer/Danker Greek-English Lexicon of the New testament

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In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by a world-class set of research and study tools. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

The Story of Aḥikar

  • Editors: F. C. Conybeare and J. Rendel Harris
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1913
  • Pages: 416

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This piece of wisdom literature was originally associated with the Arabian Nights, but papyri discoveries in the late 19th century at Elephantine lead scholars to begin associating this story with the Biblical Apocrypha instead. Its contents show many similarities both the biblical Book of Proverbs and also the deuterocanonical Wisdom of Sirach. The main character, Aḥikar, was chancellor to King Sennacherib and Esarhaddon of Assyria, whose adopted son plots against his life.

J. Rendel Harris (1852–1941) was educated at Clare College, Cambridge, before becoming professor of New Testament Greek at Johns Hopkins University and at Haverford College. Harris then taught theology at Leiden University. He spent much of his career in the Near East, collecting and translating rare manuscripts.

A Manual of Greek Historical Inscriptions

  • Editors: E. L. Hicks and G. F. Hill
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication Date: 1901
  • Pages: 392

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

A seminal introduction to the study of Greek inscriptions, Hicks and Hill’s textbook covers a wide historical period from 8th century B.C. through the 4th century B.C. Challenging traditional assumptions about which texts make the literary traditional of the Greek world, this volume provides a fascinating insight into the fuller history of Greece and the Greek language. Filled with detailed notes and explanations for helping students with difficult usage.

Edward Lee Hicks (1843–1919) was a scholar and priest. Raised by evangelical parents, Hicks was educated at Oxford , where then them served as a Fellow and a Tutor at Corpus Christi College at Oxford. He was Bishop of Lincoln From 1910 until his death in 1919.

George Francis Hill (1867–1948) was born to missionaries in India. He attended University College, London and the Merton College Oxford, becoming an expert in numismatics, the study of ancient coins. He served as the director and principal librarian of the British Museum from 1931–1936.

Greek papyri from the Cairo museum together with papyri of Roman Egypt from American Collections

  • Editor: Edgar Johnson Goodspeed
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 92

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This volume presents fascinating collection of literary documentary papyri brought together by Edgar Goodspeed of the University of Chicago. With transcriptions, translations, and introductory notes explaining the context and important information about each text: their providence, grammar, and vocabulary.

Edgar Johnson Goodspeed (1871–1962) was educated at Denison University and the University of Chicago. Goodspeed went on to become professor of biblical literature and patristics at the University of Chicago in 1894. Goodspeed’s works include The Twelve: The Story of Christ’s Apostles, Problems of New Testament Translation, and The Apostolic Fathers: An American Translation.

Introduction to Greek Epigraphy, Part 1: The Archaic Inscriptions and the Greek Alphabet

  • Editors: Ernest S. Roberts and Ernest Arthur Gardner
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1887
  • Pages: 451

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

These two volumes are designed to provide a complete introduction to Greek inscriptions and epigraphic material. Part I lays out a thorough account of the history of the Greek alphabet, particularly as represented by inscriptions across the Greek world. Written before the decipherment of Linear B, the focus is on the development and modification of the Phoenician alphabet based on the inscriptional evidence, as well as regional variations found among the Greek dialects.

Ernest S. Roberts (1847–1912) was a classicist and academic administrator. He studied at Cambridge and later served as the vice-chancellor of the university. Roberts lectured in classics, comparative philology, and was a leading scholar of Greek epigraphy.

Ernest Arthur Gardner (1862–1939) was a British archaeologist. He served as the director of the British School in Athens, Greece between 1887 and 1895.

Introduction to Greek Epigraphy: Part 2: The Inscriptions of Attica

  • Editors: Ernest S. Roberts and Ernest Arthur Gardner
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication Date: 1905
  • Pages: 638

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Part II of this two-volume set introducing the art and science of Greek epigraphic research introduces students to a collection of Attic inscriptions. Each one also provides discussion and commentary. Formulaic phrases are noted, as well as structural patterns common in types of texts, such as political decrees.

Ernest S. Roberts (1847–1912) was a classicist and academic administrator. He studied at Cambridge and later served as the vice-chancellor of the university. Roberts lectured in classics, comparative philology, and was a leading scholar of Greek epigraphy.

Ernest Arthur Gardner (1862–1939) was a British archaeologist. He served as the director of the British School in Athens, Greece between 1887 and 1895.

The Odes and Psalms of Solomon Volume I: Text

  • Editors: J. Rendel Harris and Alphonse Mingana
  • Publisher: University of Manchester Press
  • Publication Date: 1916
  • Pages: 242

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This first volume of two presents an effort to provide scholars with the requisite materials for text-critical work on the Odes of Solomon. This volume’s primarily contribution is the textual apparatus, facsimiles of the text, which is complete for one of the manuscripts included. The apparatus provides context for comparing the Greek text and the Syriac text against each other.

J. Rendel Harris (1852–1941) was educated at Clare College, Cambridge, before becoming professor of New Testament Greek at Johns Hopkins University and at Haverford College. Harris then taught theology at Leiden University. He spent much of his career in the Near East, collecting and translating rare manuscripts.

Alphonse Mingana (1878–1937) was born in the region of Mosul in about 1878. He was educated at the Syro-Chaldean seminary in Mosul, and ordained priest in the Chaldean Church. From 1902-1910 he was Professor of Syriac at Mosul. His wide scholarly output included many editions of hitherto unknown Syriac and Arabic texts. In 1913, on the invitation of J. Rendel Harris, Mingana came to England. In 1915, he was appointed to the John Rylands Library, Manchester as curator of oriental manuscripts, where he stayed until 1932, after which he moved to Birmingham as curator of the manuscript collection named after him.

The Odes and Psalms of Solomon Volume II: Translation

  • Editors: J. Rendel Harris and Alphonse Mingana
  • Publisher: University of Manchester Press
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 484

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The second volume of Harris and Mingana’s work on The Odes of Psalms of Solomon contains their complete translation of the text of volume one, along with a critical introduction, answering question about the time and place these song’s composition and important issues of interpretation. The translation is provided alongside critical notes that provide a running commentary on the text of The Odes and Psalms of Solomon.

J. Rendel Harris (1852–1941) was educated at Clare College, Cambridge, before becoming professor of New Testament Greek at Johns Hopkins University and at Haverford College. Harris then taught theology at Leiden University. He spent much of his career in the Near East, collecting and translating rare manuscripts.

Alphonse Mingana (1878–1937) was born in the region of Mosul in about 1878. He was educated at the Syro-Chaldean seminary in Mosul, and ordained priest in the Chaldean Church. From 1902-1910 he was Professor of Syriac at Mosul. His wide scholarly output included many editions of hitherto unknown Syriac and Arabic texts. In 1913, on the invitation of J. Rendel Harris, Mingana came to England. In 1915, he was appointed to the John Rylands Library, Manchester as curator of oriental manuscripts, where he stayed until 1932, after which he moved to Birmingham as curator of the manuscript collection named after him.

Greek Papyri from Gurob

  • Editor: Josiah Gilbert Smyly
  • Publisher: Hodges, Figgis, & Co.
  • Publication Date: 1921
  • Pages: 76

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The papyri in this monograph were extracted from several mummy cartonnages given to the editor, Josiah Smyly, by Bernard Grenfell. While the majority were in the Demotic language, a number of them were Greek. Smyly edited them for publication, providing each with an introduction about providence and date, as well as notes, commentary, and translation.

Josiah Gilbert Smyly (1867–1948) was professor of Latin at Trinity College, Dublin.

$39.99

Collection value: $69.92
Save $29.93 (42%)

In production