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Apollos Old Testament Commentary (10 vols.)
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Overview

The Apollos Old Testament Commentary (AOTC) aims to take with equal seriousness the divine and human aspects of Scripture. It expounds the books of the Old Testament in a scholarly manner accessible to non-experts, and it shows the relevance of the Old Testament to modern readers. Written by an international team of scholars and edited by David W. Baker and Gordon J. Wenham, these commentaries are intended to serve the needs of those who preach from the Old Testament, as well as scholars and all serious students of the Bible.

The AOTC series introduces and examines the books of the Old Testament, bridging the gap between the age in which they were written and the age in which we now read them. Each commentary begins with an Introduction which gives an overview of the issues of date, authorship, sources, and outlines the theology of the book, providing pointers towards its interpretation and contemporary application. An annotated Translation of the Hebrew text by the author forms the basis for the subsequent commentary.

Within the commentary, form and structure sections examine the context, rhetorical devices, and source and form-critical issues of each passage. Comment sections offer thorough, detailed exegesis of the historical and theological meaning of each passage, and explanation sections offer a full exposition of the theological message within the framework of biblical theology and a commitment to the inspiration and authority of the Old Testament.

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Presents scholarly content in an accessible manner
  • Aims to reveal the relevance of the Old Testament to modern readers
  • Provides an introduction, an annotated tranlation of the Hebrew text, and in-depth commentary

Praise for the Print Edition

What every preacher and student needs is a commentary that makes positive use of the results of scholarly research while at the same time integrating them sympathetically into a contemporary Christian theological worldview. Many series have set out to achieve this, but few have succeeded. Now at last the Apollos series looks set to do so: the names of the editors and potential contributors, together with the evidence of these early volumes, all inspire confidence.

—H. G. M. Williamson, FBA, Regius Professor of Hebrew, University of Oxford

At last! A commentary series that combines the best of biblical scholarship with a passion for the message of the text. Besides, it actually answers the questions I ask when I read the Scriptures. This series by the finest evangelical scholars is designed for students and pastors who are serious about understanding the Old Testament in its context and translating its message for the church in the twenty-first century.

—Daniel Block, Professor of Old Testament, Wheaton College

Evangelical Old Testament study has made huge strides in the second half of the twentieth century. Tyndale House in the U.K. and IVP internationally were central to that renaissance. And now at the start of the twenty-first century the Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series will build on that foundation as it showcases some of the best contemporary Old Testament interpretation. This series rightly insists on rigorous scholarship but always in the service of the theology and message of the books of the Old Testament. Some outstanding scholars are signed up for this series, and I look forward very much to having these commentaries on my shelves as they appear.

—Craig Bartholomew, Senior Research Fellow, University of Gloucestershire, editor of the Scripture and Hermeneutics series

Product Details

Individual Titles

Exodus

  • Author: T. Desmond Alexander
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Pages: 708

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Recounting the greatest event of divine salvation in the Old Testament, the book of Exodus is not merely a story about the Lord God rescuing enslaved Israelites from the power of a despotic and xenophobic dictator. More importantly, it highlights how a compassionate and justice-seeking God transforms the lives of victimized people so that they may experience life in all its fullness in his holy presence. This transformation involves a unique process that includes redemption, ransoming, cleansing, and consecration. The story of Exodus illustrates an all-important paradigm for understanding the nature and goal of divine salvation, anticipating an even greater exodus that will come through Jesus Christ.

In this Apollos Old Testament Commentary volume, Desmond Alexander grapples with the many and varied complexities of the carefully constructed literary collage of Exodus. As an integral part of the longer narrative that runs from Genesis to 2 Kings, Exodus recounts a dramatic and unified story of how the Israelites come to a deep and close relationship with the Lord God. Narrating past events, Exodus speaks to contemporary society, revealing a God who passionately desires to draw people into an intimate and exclusive relationship with himself. This detailed commentary sheds fresh light on one of the most influential books ever written.

T. Desmond Alexander is senior lecturer in biblical studies and director of postgraduate studies at Union Theological College in Belfast, Northern Ireland. From 1980 to 1999, he was lecturer in Semitic studies at the Queen’s University of Belfast. His main field of research is the Pentateuch, about which he has written extensively in academic journals and books.

Alexander also has a special interest in the relationship between the Old and New Testaments. He is the author of From Paradise to the Promised Land: An Introduction to the Main Themes of the Pentateuch and Abraham in the Negev, and he is a coeditor (with Brian S. Rosner) of the New Dictionary of Biblical Theology (IVP, 2000).

Leviticus

  • Author: N. Kiuchi
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2007
  • Pages: 538

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Old Testament Book of Leviticus is the sequel to Exodus in that it deals with a deeper dimension of the Sinaitic covenant, giving various rules for the life of the Israelites and for the sacrifices and offerings to be performed in the sanctuary. It addresses the question of how the Israelites—human beings—can live in proximity to the holy God who has promised to dwell in their midst.

In this excellent commentary, Nobuyoshi Kiuchi offers in-depth discussion of the theology and symbolism of Leviticus. He argues that its laws present an exceedingly high standard, arising from divine holiness, and the giving of these laws to the Israelites is intended to make them aware of their sinfulness, to lead them to hopelessness, and ultimately to destroy their egocentric nature.

To be confronted by the laws in Leviticus is to recognize the vast distance that separates the holy from the unclean and sinful, and so to appreciate afresh the grace of God, ultimately expressed in the life and work of Christ.

N. Kiuchi is professor of Old Testament at Tokyo Christian University, Japan. He is the author of The Purification Offering in the Priestly Literature (JSOT Press) and A Study of Hata' and Hatta't in Leviticus 4-5 (Mohr Siebeck), and a contributor to the New Dictionary of Biblical Theology (IVP). He studied in England for his Ph.D. at the College of St. Paul & St. Mary, Cheltenham (now part of the University of Gloucestershire) and the Oxford Centre for Post-graduate Hebrew Studies.

Deuteronomy

  • Author: J. Gordon McConville
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 544

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In this outstanding commentary J. Gordon McConville offers a theological interpretation of the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy in the context of the biblical canon. He gives due attention to historical issues where these bear on what can be known about the settings in which the text emerged. His dominant method is one that approaches Deuteronomy as a finished work.

McConville argues that in the context of the ancient world Deuteronomy should be understood as the radical blueprint for the life of a people, at the same time both spiritual and political, and profoundly different from every other social, political and religious program. The book incorporates the tension between an open-minded vision of a perfectly ordered society under God and practical provisions for dealing with the frailty and imperfections of real people. Hence, it is capable of informing our thinking about the organization of societies while maintaining a vision of the kingdom of God.

J. Gordon McConville is professor of Old Testament theology at the University of Gloucestershire in Cheltenham, England. He is the author of several books and studies on Old Testament topics, including Law and Theology in Deuteronomy (JSOT Press), Time and Place in Deuteronomy (with J. G. Millar, JSOT Press), and Judgment and Promise: An Introduction to the Book of Jeremiah (Apollos).

Joshua

  • Author: Pekka Pitkänen
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 454

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Bible is both a divine and a human book. It is the inspired word of God for his people, whether in biblical times or for the church today. It is also a fully human book, written by different people in a variety of cultural settings. Knowledge of biblical language and society is essential if the meaning of the human writer is to be grasped fully.

The Apollos Old Testament Commentary aims to take with equal seriousness the divine and human aspects of Scripture. In this volume, Pekka Pitkänen shows the relevance of Joshua to modern readers. While he remains anchored in the world of the text throughout the commentary, Pitkänen brings contemporary geopolitical issues (like the Israeli-Palestinian conflict) to bear on Joshua and the genocidal “Israelite conquest tradition.”

Pekka Pitkänen is a senior lecturer for the Open Theological College course at the University of Gloucestershire. His first degree is in computer science and economics (BSc+MSc) from Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland. He also has an MDiv in theology from Chongshin University, Seoul, Korea, and a PhD in Old Testament studies from University of Gloucestershire. Dr. Pitkänen is currently working on Pentateuchal studies, with main research interests in Israelite history and historiography, ancient Near Eastern studies (including the main languages of the area), archaeology, biblical criticism and sociological and anthropological approaches to biblical studies.

Ruth

  • Author: L. Daniel Hawk
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 176

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

On the surface, the book of Ruth tells the tale of an unlikely marriage between a destitute Moabite widow and an upstanding citizen of a Judean village. The deeper import of the story, however, has to do with the internal boundaries that define the people of God. Is Israel a closed community, held together exclusively by bonds of kinship, or a nation that welcomes faithful outsiders into its sphere of belonging? Ruth appropriates marriage as the symbolic vehicle of a transformation in Israel’s self-understanding from a community articulated by Naomi’s declaration that her daughters-in-law marry within their own people, to the acclamations by the people of Bethlehem that endorse Boaz’s marriage to a Moabite.

L. Daniel Hawk undertakes a detailed narrative analysis of Ruth that goes beyond the description of its content and stylistic features to illumine its deep structure and use of metaphor. Informed by contemporary studies on ethnicity, he discovers a work of remarkable sophistication that employs a story of intermarriage to address opposing ideas of Israelite identity. Hawk’s meticulous attention to patterned structures, stylistic devices and characterization reveals the strategy by which the narrator constructs a vision of Israel that looks beyond rigid internal boundaries to the welcome of faithful foreigners as agents of blessing.

L. Daniel Hawk (PhD, Emory University) is professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio and an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church. His work on narrative and identity formation includes Evangelical Postcolonial Conversations (as co-editor and contributor), Joshua in Berit Olam and Joshua in 3-D.

1&2 Samuel

  • Author: David G. Firth
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 614

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Bible is both a divine and a human book. It is the inspired word of God for his people, whether in biblical times or for the church today. It is also a fully human book, written by different people in a variety of cultural settings. Knowledge of biblical language and society is essential if the meaning of the human writer is to be grasped fully.

The Apollos Old Testament Commentary aims to take with equal seriousness the divine and human aspects of Scripture. It expounds the books of the Old Testament in a scholarly manner accessible to non-experts and shows the relevance of the Old Testament to modern readers.

This commentary begins with an introduction, which gives an overview of the issues of date, authorship, sources and so on, but which also outlines more fully than usual the theology of 1 and 2 Samuel and provides pointers toward its interpretation and contemporary application.

The annotated translation of the Hebrew text by the author forms the basis for the subsequent commentary. The form and structure section examines the context of a passage, its use of rhetorical devices, and source and form-critical issues. The comment section is a thorough, detailed exegesis of the historical and theological meaning of the passage. The explanation—the goal of the commentary—offers a full exposition of the theological message within the framework of biblical theology, and a commitment to the inspiration and authority of the Old Testament.

David G. Firth is Old Testament tutor and head of research at St John’s College, Nottingham, England. He is the author of The Message of Esther and The Message of Joshua, and he is the coeditor of Interpreting the Psalms, Interpreting Isaiah, and Words & the Word.

1&2 Kings

  • Author: Lissa Wray Beal
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 615

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The books of 1 and 2 Kings cover the history of Israel from the last days of the united kingdom under David to the eventual fall of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah. Within these books, the deuteronomic code—‘doing what is right in the Lord’s sight’—provides a framework by which monarchic history is measured. In the kings’ cultic failures lies the apostasy of the nation and its eventual exile. This apostasy centers on Israel’s commitment to worship YHWH exclusively and to worship according to deuteronomistic norms within the Jerusalem temple as the locus of YHWH’s covenant presence. To safeguard the kings’ commitments, YHWH’s prophets loom large in 1 and 2 Kings: they herald YHWH’s purposes, warn of his judgment for apostasy, and woo his people back to the full experience of covenant life.

Lissa M. Wray Beal’s valuable commentary examines the successes and failures of monarchy in the divided kingdoms. It works with the final form of the biblical text and pursues historiographical, narrative and theological questions, including the relation of each chapter’s themes to biblical theology. While it focuses on theological and narrative concerns, the commentary gives due attention to complex historical issues. It seeks to provide a nuanced reading that is faithful to the text’s message.

Those familiar with technical commentaries will appreciate Beal’s volume. Those who are unfamiliar with Hebrew will find this resource a valuable starting point for studying 1-2 Kings.

—Abram Kielsmeier-Jones, Bible Study Magazine, November-December 2014

Lissa Wray Beal is professor of Old Testament at Providence Theological Seminary in Otterburne, Manitoba, Canada. She is coeditor of Prophets, Prophecy, and Ancient Israelite Historiography (Eisenbrauns) and author of The Deuteronomist’s Prophet (T&T Clark).

Ecclesiastes & the Song of Songs

  • Author: Daniel C. Fredericks and Daniel J. Estes
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 472

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Bible is both the inspired word of God for his people, whether in biblical times or for the church today, and a fully human book, written in a variety of cultural settings. The Apollos Old Testament Commentary aims to take with equal seriousness the divine and human aspects of Scripture.

This volume by Daniel J. Estes and Daniel J. Estes expounds the books of Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs in a scholarly manner, and it shows the relevance of these important books to today’s readers.

Edited by David W. Baker and Gordon J. Wenham, these commentaries are intended primarily to serve the needs of those who preach from the Old Testament, but is equally suitable for use by scholars and all serious students of the Bible.

The authors succeed in combining an eye for technical detail with an alertness to the message for today.

—Tim Meadowcroft, Catalyst, Vol. 40, No. 3, March 2014

The organization, sound scholarship, and engaging writing style of the authors makes the commentary a fantastic resource for pastors, scholars, and laypeople alike.

—Russell L. Meek, Midwestern Journal of Theology

Daniel C. Fredericks is senior vice president and provost at Belhaven College, Jackson. He is the author of Coping with Transience: Ecclesiastes on Brevity in Life and Qoheleth’s Language: Re-evaluating Its Nature and Date.

Daniel J. Estes (Ph.D., University of Cambridge) is professor of Bible and dean of the school of biblical and theological studies at Cedarville University in Ohio. His books include Hear, My Son and Handbook on the Wisdom Books and Psalms.

Daniel

  • Author: Ernest Lucas
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 359

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In many ways, the Old Testament book of Daniel is an enigma.

It consists of two different kinds of material: stories about Judean exiles working in the court of pagan kings (chapters 1-6) and accounts of visions experienced by one of these exiles (chapters 7-12). It is written in two languages, Hebrew and Aramaic, and the language division does not match the subject division. Whether the book’s affinities lie more with the Hebrew prophets or with later Jewish apocalypses is debated, as are its affinities with the wisdom traditions of both Israel and Babylon.

Refreshingly, Ernest Lucas postpones much of the discussion of such issues to an Epilogue, and invites the reader to an investigation of the meaning of the text in the form in which we now have it. He identifies the central theme of the book as the sovereignty of the God of Israel.

With even-handedness and clarity, Lucas demonstrates that, for preachers and teachers, there is much in Daniel that is fairly readily understandable and applicable, and that there are also theological depths that are rewarding for those willing to plumb them and wrestle with the issues they raise.

Ernest Lucas is vice-principal and tutor in biblical studies at Bristol Baptist College in England. He is the author of a number of scholarly articles on the book of Daniel and, at the popular level, Can We Believe Genesis Today?

Haggai, Zechariah, & Malachi

  • Author: Anthony R. Petterson
  • Series: Apollos Old Testament Commentary Series (AOTC)
  • Publisher: IVP, Apollos
  • Publication Date: 2015
  • Pages: 448

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The post-exilic prophetic books of Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi are set in times of great adversity. God’s people are minnows in the vast Persian Empire, and the promises of the earlier prophets for a glorious restoration of Jerusalem seem far from their experience. These books, from beginning to end, restate God’s intention to establish his glorious kingdom, and explain what this means for the lives of his people.

For Haggai and Zechariah, the immediate challenge was to rebuild the temple in view of God’s return. For Malachi, the challenge was covenant unfaithfulness which had infected the people’s attitudes towards God, and how this needed to change in view of future judgment. God used each of these prophets to remind the people of the true King and to re-order their lives and their community in the light of the reality of his coming kingdom.

In this Apollos Old Testament Commentary, Anthony R. Petterson offers detailed commentary on these prophetic books, setting them in their wider biblical-theological context. He shows the connections between the post-exilic world and our own, and explains how these books contain a vital message for the church today, living in the gap between promise and reality.

The Apollos Old Testament Commentary series aims to take with equal seriousness the divine and human aspects of Scripture. It expounds the books of the Old Testament in a scholarly manner accessible to non-experts, and shows the relevance of the Old Testament to modern readers. Intended primarily to serve the needs of those who preach from the Old Testament, they are equally suitable for use by scholars and all serious students of the Bible.

This commentary manages well to combine the concerns of the scholarly community and the church and also to respond to the concerns and needs of the latter. As such, I can recommend it warmly.

—Lena-Sofia Tiemeyer, Journal for the Evangelical Study of the Old Testament, 5.1 (2016)

I like the confessional-critical-approach argued for and demonstrated in Anthony Petterson’s Haggai, Zechariah and Malachi (Apollos OTC; IVP). Petterson combines the basic scholarly tools with the confessional conviction that the Bible is the Word of God. The result is a fairly technical commentary, which also shows how the message of these prophets fits with the rest of the canon and speaks to us today. Petterson treats difficult words and concepts and shows how scholars who denigrate the post-exilic prophets miss how their message fits with what came before and what comes after. This will be quite useful for preaching.

—Ray Van Neste, Preaching, November/December 2015

If you have never done any serious study of the last three books of the OT grab a copy of this book. If you want to study or preach the post-exilic prophets in a way which brings their message to life, this Apollos commentary will be a great aid to your endeavour. Its message is fresh, relevant and Christ focused. It is a pleasure to read. In a neglected area of the OT preaching and teaching, Dr. Petterson’s commentary is a great addition.

—Len Firth, Patheos, August 26, 2015

This is a fine addition to a very useful series of commentaries and is highly commended both to academics and to preachers.

—Iain Duguid, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 2016

Anthony R. Petterson is lecturer in Old Testament and Hebrew at Morling College, New South Wales, Australia. Previously he served as pastor of Hornsby Heights Baptist Church, Sydney, and associate pastor of Grosvenor Road Baptist Church, Dublin. He is the author of Behold Your King: The Hope for the House of David in the Book of Zechariah, and study notes on Haggai and Zechariah for a new edition of the NIV Study Bible.

About the Editors

David W. Baker (AB, MCS, MPhil, PhD) is professor of Old Testament and Semitic languages at Ashland Theological Seminary in Ashland, Ohio. He serves as editor for the Evangelical Theological Society Dissertation and Evangelical Theological Society Studies series as well as for Sources for Biblical and Theological Studies (Eisenbrauns, Winona Lake). He is coauthor (with Bill T. Arnold) of The Face of Old Testament Studies: A Survey of Contemporary Approaches. In addition, he has written many articles, essays and commentaries.

Gordon J. Wenham is lecturer in Old Testament at Trinity College, Bristol. He was formerly professor of Old Testament at the University of Gloucestershire. He is a recognized expert on the Pentateuch and has written commentaries on Genesis, Leviticus, and Numbers in addition to numerous studies in the Old Testament.