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Products>Mobile Ed: TH293 Israelology: The Doctrine of Israel (13 hour course)

Mobile Ed: TH293 Israelology: The Doctrine of Israel (13 hour course)

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$379.99

Collection value: $714.99
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Overview

The issue of Israel is one of the major points of division in evangelical theology today. This is true both among Arminians and Calvinists. An evangelical theologian’s view of Israel will determine whether he is a Covenant Theologian or a Dispensationalist. It will also determine what kind of Covenant Theologian he is: postmillennial, amillennial, or premillennial. The question of Israel is central for a proper systematic theology. Paul, in his epistle to the Romans, which contains the first systematic theology in Church history, expounds on Israel in the center of his epistle, devoting three full chapters (9–11) out of sixteen to this topic. Yet, while there are many Systematic Theologies today which have systematized areas of biblical truth, none thus far have developed an Israelology as part of their system.

The primary purpose of this course is to identify and systematize the doctrine of Israel through four Protestant conservative/evangelical systematic theologies. This purpose includes identifying and defining the four systems of theology and the systematic theology upon which they are based; showing where Israelology fits into the framework of a total systematic theology; and, determining how a theological system may lead to anti-Semitism, pro-Semitism, or indifference to the issue. The secondary purpose of this course is to develop and systematize a theology of Israel consistent within the framework of dispensationalism.

 

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion you should be able to:

  • Understand and summarize a doctrine of Israel through the systems of Systematic Theology
  • Understand how one’s view of Israel determines whether they are a Covenant Theologian or a Dispensationalist
  • Discuss how a theological system may lead to anti-Semitism, pro-Semitism, or indifference to the issue
  • Develop and systematize a theology of Israel consistent within the framework of Dispensationalism

Course Outline

Introduction

  • The Purpose
  • Definition of Terms
  • The Significance and Importance of this Study
  • The Place of Israelology in Systematic Theology
  • Procedure

Unit 1: The Israelology of Covenant Postmillennialism

  • Israel Past
    • Israel the Chosen People
    • The Church in the Old Testament
    • The Law of Moses
    • The Way of Salvation
    • The Kingdom of God
  • Israel Present
    • Israel and the Church
    • The Kingdom of God
    • The Law of Moses
    • The State of Israel Today
    • Romans 9:1-11:24 and the Olive Tree
  • Israel Future
    • Eschatology
    • The National Salvation of Israel and Romans 11:23-33
  • Summary and Conclusions of the Israelology of Covenant Postmillennialism

Unit 2: The Israelology of Covenant Amillennialism

  • Israel Past
    • The Covenant of Grace
    • The Abrahamic Covenant
    • The Mosaic Covenant and the Law of Moses
    • The Way of Salvation
    • The Church in the Old Testament
  • Israel Present
    • The New Covenant
    • The Abrahamic Covenant
    • The Mosaic Covenant and the Law of Moses
    • Israel and the Church
    • The Kingdom of God and the Church
    • Israel Today
    • The Olive Tree of Romans 11
  • Israel Future
    • No Future for Israel
    • Romans 11:25-32 and “All Israel Shall Be Saved”
  • Summary and Conclusions of the Israelology of Covenant Amillennialism

Unit 3: The Israelology of Covenant Premillennialism

  • Israel Past
    • Israel the Chosen People
    • The Abrahamic Covenant
    • The Church in the Old Testament
  • Israel Present
    • Israel and the Church
    • The Kingdom of God
    • The Law of Moses
    • Israel Today
    • Romans 9-11 and the Olive Tree
  • Israel Future
    • The Rapture of the Church
    • The 144,000 of Revelation 7 and 14
    • The Woman of Revelation 12
    • Romans 11:25-27 and Israel’s National Salvation
    • The Messianic Kingdom
  • Summary and Conclusions of the Israelology of Covenant Premillennialism

Unit 4: The Israelology of Dispensationalism

  • Israel Past
    • Israel the Chosen People
    • The Unconditional Covenants
    • The Mosaic Covenant and the Law of Moses
  • Israel Present
    • The Kingdom of God
    • The Unconditional Covenants and Israel’s Present Status
    • Israel and the Church
    • The Law of Moses and the Law of Christ
    • Israel Today
    • Romans 9:1-11:24 and the Olive Tree
  • Israel Future
    • The Unconditional Covenants
    • The Rapture and the Tribulation
    • Romans 11:25-27, the Second Coming and the National Salvation of Israel
    • The Messianic Kingdom and Israel’s Regathering, and Final Restoration
  • Summary and Conclusions of the Israelology of Dispensationalism

Unit 5: A Dispensational Israel

  • Israel Past
    • The Election of Israel
    • The Unconditional Covenants
    • The Mosaic Covenant and the Law of Moses
    • The Remnant of Israel
  • Israel Present
    • The Kingdom of God Program
    • The Rejection of the Messiahship of Jesus and its Results and Consequences
    • The Unconditional Covenants
    • The Mosaic Covenant and the Law of Moses
    • Israel and the Church
    • Israel Today
    • Romans 9:1-11:24
    • Hebrew Christianity/Messianic Jews
  • Israel Future
    • Israel and the Church Age
    • Israel and Tribulation
    • Israel and the Second Coming
    • Israel and the Messianic Kingdom
    • Israel and the Eternal Order
  • Other Relevant Topics
    • The Symbolic Illustrations of Israel
    • Anti-Semitism
    • Israelology and Systematic Theology

Product Details

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About the Instructor

Arnold G. Fruchtenbaum (1943– ) is one of the foremost authorities on the nation of Israel. He is a messianic believer and founder and director of Ariel Ministries, an organization dedicated to evangelism and discipleship of Jewish people.

Fruchtenbaum was born in Siberia and just four years later his family escaped to Germany after Fruchtenbaum’s father was released from a communist prison in Siberia. While living in Germany, Arnold received Orthodox training from his father. The Fruchtenbaums immigrated to New York, and five years later, at age 13, Arnold came to believe that Jesus was the Messiah.

Before earning his doctorate from New York University, Fruchtenbaum also studied at Dallas Theological Seminary, Jewish Theological Seminary, and Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Fruchtenbaum worked as a missionary with American Board of Missions to Jews (known today as Chosen People Ministries) where he also served as editor of their monthly publication, The Chosen People.

Titles from Fruchtenbaum include How Jewish Is Christianity?: 2 Views on the Messianic Movement, Ariel’s Bible Commentary: The Book of Genesis, and titles in the Ariel Ministries Messianic Collection (11 vols.).

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Logos Mobile Education is a highly effective cross-platform learning environment that integrates world class teaching with the powerful study tools and theological libraries available in Logos Bible Software. Every course provides links to additional resources and suggested readings that supplement the lecture material at the end of every transcript segment.

This course was produced with screencast videos. These videos provide tutorials showing you how to use Logos Bible Software in ways that are tied directly into the content of the course. We are now producing Activities resources as a replacement for screencast videos. We plan on updating this course to include this additional Activities resource in the future for no extra charge.

 

Reviews

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  1. Dean Poulos

    Dean Poulos

    8/16/2019

    It took me almost two semesters and only then could I say I was comfortable with answering any questions posted on by Lewis Sperry Chafer’s ST. Truly one of the greats Then what happens? Years later Dr Fruchtenbaum comes along with topic that is truly missing in ST. When I say this, I do not mean it must be dispensational. However, it must be addressed. Although Dr. Fruchtenbaum cites Chafer a great deal, and only mildly points out ‘he got it best, but it needs more,” is an understatement," IMHO. The Olivet discourse and ‘[T]his generation as referring to destruction of Israel in before 70AD, (and the many other theories of our Lord is just trying to answer a simple question, the disciples understood easily. The end will not come until all these things pass, and unless someone can show me just the bowl judgements heaped against Israel before the Neuronic dating, the blood moon, or the other signs, etc. etc. and ONE single mention of the church after Rev. 3. The generation is the final one who will be here physically and regenerated and saved by grace. (Let's us remember, the One who restrains will be removed during the latter 3.5 years. There is so much that needs happen, it boggles the mind to claim it happened before 68 AD and while the dating the Revelation of Jesus Christ also must be changed to about 55-58 AD, none of this seems to matter and I’ll be the 1st to say, it would not matter if there were 50 witnesses who confirmed the later date. It is what becomes of the individual (what they must accept) with an early date. Although I was Born and Raised Reformed (Baptist) I could not remove the literal text from my and heart and logic won over allegory. John McArthur quotes Calvin, who I will never dare to disrespect. Calvin was exceptional. He home to be with the Lord, but Sproul Sr. at times reminded me of Calvin. Here is the snip it Jfrom institutes: "The text ought to be taken at face-value, not in a woodenly-literalistic way, but according to the normal use of language." To quote ywt another gem from Calvin, “Let us know that the true meaning of Scripture is the genuine and simple one.” f he had applied that principle to every biblical passage, the history of Reformed eschatology would have been radically different. Those who follow in the Reformed tradition, with a heavy view of Sovereignty also hold to a literal approach to Bible interpretation, and such people ought to be the foremost advocates of premillennialism. From the standpoint of hermeneutics, it is inconsistent for them not to be. Any time I post something like this, I like to end with this has not one iota to do with a Reformed Amllennial Salvific status and never will. ”Of course, I give this course and Dr. Fruchtenbaum's books 5 stars. In my Lord’s service, Dean Poulos
    Reply

  2. Deepak Kumar Singh
    The course examines the four major interpretations of the millennium mentioned in Rev 20 and how they impact Israelology. I found the course very informative and engaging. Dr. Arnold G. Fruchtenbaum discusses and compares dispensational premillennialism, historic premillennialism, postmillennialism, & amillennialism and explains how the nation of Israel fits into the events of the end times. It helps you to understand how both Jews and Gentiles fit into God’s plan of salvation. Would recommend it highly!
    Reply

  3. Dr. Walter E. Dimmitt
    I certainly understand the cost concerns of many; however, there are not many available resources such as this with such rich and current content. A subscription option is also appealing where for a monthly fee you have available to you the entire mobile ed library.
    Reply

  4. Richard Labelle
    Mobile Ed is a fantastic product but ... yes, expensive (I can understand that). However, a good solution to cut the cost for many of us would be to purchase the "Audio" only part of the course but the drawback to this is that is exactly what it is, the "Audio" only, no transcript. Unfortunately that is also unacceptable for me (and probably many others) for often, in playing the audio, I don't get what the speaker is saying (I speak French and English as a second language) as if a transcript would be made available, I could find out what it is and use other Logos resources to find meaning).
    Reply

  5. Oldnewbie

    Oldnewbie

    11/6/2017

    Bob and Andrew, Maybe I could suggest the subscription to Mobile Ed. It is a fixed price ($49.99/month I believe) so your expenses would be predictable. The only downside would be that you don't control what courses are available on a monthly basis. Also, you might want to contact Faithlife and find out if the Mobile Ed courses are shown on Faithlife TV, which is only 4.99/month. Hope this is helpful in some way.
    Reply

  6. Bob B

    Bob B

    7/19/2017

    This is mot a review of this course. Rather it is a review on the pricing of Logos products. Many are so expensive that as a retired man on a fixed income, I can not afford them. I am, in general, reluctant too purchase them on a credit basis or pay with a credit card.
    Reply

$379.99

Collection value: $714.99
Save $335.00 (46%)
Payment plans available in cart