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Crossway Biblical Theology Collection (7 vols.)
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Overview

Biblical Theology is a critical genre that allows Christians to understand and communicate their faith with clarity, nuance, and persuasion. In recent years, Crossway has produced a number of single-volume biblical theologies that explore the entirety of Scripture or a key section of Scripture, pin-pointing important themes based on sound exegesis, sensitivity to literary conventions, and the core theological beliefs of classical Protestantism. The books in this collection, written by pastors and scholars who are known for their interpretive acumen and fidelity to the Bible, provide incisive expositions of Scripture that will challenge, inform, and edify Christians whether they are academics, pastors, or simply trying to understand the gospel more completely. The collection features some of evangelicalism’s most astute minds, including James Hamilton, Gerald Bray, and Scott Hafeman.

In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Key Features

  • Features comprehensive presentations of the Bible’s key themes
  • Juxtaposes in-depth exegetical analysis with core theological concepts
  • Provides clear, applicable expositions on the message of the gospel from each biblical book

Product Details

Individual Titles

God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology

  • Author: James M. Hamilton Jr.
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 640

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

In Exodus 34 Moses asks to see God’s glory, and God reveals himself as a God who is merciful and just. James Hamilton Jr. contends that from this passage comes a biblical theology that unites the meta-narrative of Scripture under one central theme: God’s glory in salvation through judgment.

Hamilton begins in the Old Testament by showing that Israel was saved through God’s judgment on the Egyptians and the Caananites. God was glorified through both his judgment and mercy, accorded in salvation to Israel. The New Testament unfolds the ultimate display of God’s glory in justice and mercy, as it was God’s righteous judgment shown on the cross that brought us salvation. God’s glory in salvation through judgment will be shown at the end of time, when Christ returns to judge his enemies and save all who have called on his name.

Hamilton moves through the Bible book by book, showing that there is one theological center to the whole Bible. The volume’s systematic method and scope make it a unique resource for pastors, professors, and students.

I was riveted. Never do I sit down and read sixty pages of ANY book that I get in the mail. But I could not stop—could not stop reading and could not stop rejoicing over God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment. It is the kind of overview of redemptive history Edwards wanted to write. It’s what I hoped would be written.

John Piper, chancellor, Bethlehem College and Seminary

As readers of Scripture we long to know the message of the Bible as a whole. We do not want to miss the forest for the trees. Unfortunately, there are few books that help us to be faithful to the whole counsel of God. What a delight, then, to read Jim Hamilton’s book where the story line of the Scriptures is unfolded. Hamilton rightly sees that the glory of God is at the center of the scriptural record, demonstrating with careful attention to the biblical text the supremacy of God in both the Old Testament and the New. Scholars, students, and laypeople will all profit from reading this work, which instructs the mind, enlivens the heart, and summons us to obedience.

Thomas R. Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

In an era when centers in general no longer hold, Hamilton makes a strong case for the centrality to biblical theology of what C. H. Dodd called the ‘two-beat rhythm’ of biblical history: salvation through judgment. Hamilton discovers this theme in every book of the Bible and argues that it is the heartbeat of God’s ultimate purpose: the publication of his glory. In seeking to do justice to scriptural unity and diversity alike, Hamilton’s work represents biblical theology at its best.

Kevin J. Vanhoozer, research professor of systematic theology, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

James M. Hamilton Jr. is professor of biblical theology at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and preaching pastor at Kenwood Baptist Church. He is the author of God’s Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old and New Testaments and Revelation: God Speaks to the Churches in the Preaching the Word Commentary Series.

God Is Love: A Biblical and Systematic Theology

  • Author: Gerald Bray
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 768

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

While there is no substitute for personal, faithful, and careful Bible reading and prayer, the Bible’s vast size and diversity can make distilling its truth a daunting task. Thus most Christians benefit from supplemental resources to help learn and apply what Scripture teaches. Renowned theologian, Gerald Bray has produced just such a resource in his new biblical theology. Though packed with robust content, he writes about this volume: “the aim . . . is to reach those who would not normally find systematic theology appealing or even comprehensible.”

This volume is unique from others in that Bray traces the common theme of God’s love through the Bible categorically—from God’s love for himself and his creation to the cross as the ultimate expression of God’s love, among other categories. The centrality of God’s love in Bray’s theology reflects a deep conviction that the Bible shows us God for who he really is. This volume is of interest to Christians seeking to grow in their faith.

Gerald Bray is one of our leading evangelical scholars and teachers and he has given us here a magisterial overview of Christian belief and doctrine. A great example of theology in the service of the church.

Timothy George, Founding Dean, Beeson Divinity School; General Editor, Reformation Commentary on Scripture

Soaked in the depth and breadth of the Christian tradition, Gerald Bray brings a rich wisdom to his exceedingly accessible systematic theology. Freshly organizing his approach around love, Bray does not fall into cheap sentimentality, but instead carefully teases out the drama and story of divine love and how it should inform our understanding of countless areas of theology and life. Students and laity in particular will find this volume immensely helpful, and I heartily recommend it to all!

Kelly M. Kapic, professor of theological studies, Covenant College

Gerald Bray is research professor at Beeson Divinity School and director of research for the Latimer Trust. He is a prolific writer and has authored or edited numerous books, including Reformation Commentary on Scripture, NT vol. 10: Galatians, Ephesians, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture: 1-2 Corinthians, 2nd ed., and Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture: Romans, 2nd ed..

Against the Gods: The Polemical Theology of the Old Testament

  • Author: John D. Currid
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 160

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Did the Old Testament writers borrow ideas from their pagan neighbors? And if they did, was it done uncritically? John Currid, a distinguished Old Testament scholar and archaeologist engages with this controversial question by carefully comparing the biblical text to other ancient Near Eastern documents. Well-researched and thoughtfully nuanced, Currid aims to outline the precise relationship between the biblical worldview and that of Israel’s neighbors.

A clearly written account of a centrally important issue—the influence (or not) of ancient Near Eastern thought upon Old Testament writers. John Currid’s books and commentaries have proven invaluable, and in this additional volume, his thorough research, theological acumen, and nuanced argumentation makes it an essential requirement for ministers, theological students, and serious students of Scripture. This is an invaluable aid in furthering our understanding of the Old Testament and a loud affirmation of the Bible’s utter trustworthiness and inerrancy. A marvelous book.

Derek Thomas, Robert Strong Professor of Systematic and Pastoral Theology, Reformed Theological Seminary

This is a splendid introduction to the use that the Old Testament makes of the religious ideas of Israel’s ancient neighbors. Currid compares the biblical accounts of creation and the flood with the versions from neighboring cultures and shows how the Bible puts down and rejects the theological ideas of Babylon, Egypt, the Hittites, and the Canaanites. This process, which Currid terms ‘polemical theology’, serves to demonstrate the unique sovereignty of the God of Israel. This is a very positive approach to the issues raised by the extrabiblical parallels and is greatly preferable to seeing the parallels as showing the Bible as simply borrowed pagan ideas and myths.

Gordon Wenham, adjunct professor of Old Testament, Trinity College, Bristol

In this vital work John Currid presents an enormously useful approach to understanding the relationship of the Old Testament to the literature and thought of Israel’s ancient Near Eastern neighbors. This book is certainly a must read for any Old Testament scholar, yet it also provides a relevant and readable introduction for every student of Scripture.

—David Chapman, professor of New Testament and archaeology, Covenant Theological Seminary

John D. Currid is the Carl McMurray Professor of Old Testament at Reformed Theological Seminary in Charlotte, North Carolina, and the author of several books and Old Testament commentaries. Having earned his doctorate from the University of Chicago in archaeology, he has extensive archaeological field experience from projects throughout Israel and Tunisia. He has authored many books, including Why Do I Suffer?: Suffering and the Sovereignty of God, Calvin and the Biblical Languages, and A Study Commentary on Genesis, and Ancient Egypt and the Old Testament.

Kingdom through Covenant: A Biblical-Theological Understanding of the Covenants

  • Authors: Peter J. Gentry, Stephen J. Wellum
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 848

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The disciplines of biblical and systematic theology join forces to investigate anew the biblical covenants and the implications of such a study for understanding how God relates to his people. By incorporating the latest available research from the ancient Near East and examining implications of their work for Christology, ecclesiology, eschatology, and hermeneutics—biblical scholar Peter Gentry and systematic theologian Stephen Wellum present a thoughtful, exegetically based viable alternative to both covenant theology and dispensationalism.

Kingdom through Covenant is hermeneutically sensitive, exegetically rigorous, and theologically rich—a first rate biblical theology that addresses both the message and structure of the whole Bible from the ground up. Gentry and Wellum have produced what will become one of the standard texts in the field. For anyone who wishes to tread the path of biblical revelation, this text is a faithful guide.

Miles V. Van Pelt, Alan Belcher Professor of Old Testament and Biblical Languages and Academic Dean, Reformed Theological Seminary, Jackson, Mississippi

What do you get when you cross a world class Bible scholar and a first rate systematic theologian? You get 800-plus pages of power-packed biblical goodness. You get the forest and quite a few of the trees. This is not the first volume that has attempted to mediate the dispensational/covenant theology divide, but it may be the culminating presentation of that discussion—just as Bach was not the first Baroque composer but its highest moment. Gentry and Wellum’s proposal of Kingdom through Covenant should be read by all parties, but I won’t be surprised to learn in 20 years that this volume provided the foundation for how a generation of anyone who advocates regenerate church membership puts their Bible together.

Jonathan Leeman, editorial director, 9Marks

Gentry and Wellum offer a third way, a via media, between covenant theology and dispensationalism, arguing that both of these theological systems are not informed sufficiently by biblical theology. Certainly we cannot understand the scriptures without comprehending ‘the whole counsel of God,’ and here we find incisive exegesis and biblical theology at its best. This book is a must read and will be part of the conversation for many years to come.

Thomas R. Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Peter J. Gentry is professor of Old Testament Interpretation at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and director of the Hexapla Institute.

Stephen J. Wellum is professor of Christian theology at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and editor of the Southern Baptist Journal of Theology.

The God of Promise and the Life of Faith: Understanding the Heart of the Bible

  • Author: Scott J. Hafemann
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 256

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This theological primer lets the Bible tell its own message, providing a basic framework for Scripture that will encourage readers to take up the Bible for themselves and grow in faith, hope, and love. Based on the seasoned scholarship and incisive exegesis of Scott Hafemann, The God of Promise and the Life of Faith helps Christians better understand the power of the Bible’s message and readily grasp the meaning of God’s love for his people.

Scott J. Hafemann is reader in new Testament at St. Andrews University. He is the author of multiple books, including Paul’s Message and Ministry in Covenant Perspective: Selected Essays and contributed to Galatians and Christian Theology: Justification, the Gospel, and Ethics in Paul’s Letter.

What Is Biblical Theology?: A Guide to the Bible's Story, Symbolism, and Patterns

  • Author: James M. Hamilton Jr.
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 128

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Bible recounts a single story—one that began at creation, encompasses our lives today, and will continue till Christ’s return and beyond. In What Is Biblical Theology?, Jim Hamilton introduces us to this narrative, helping us understand the worldview of the biblical writers so that we can read the Old and New Testaments as those authors intended. Tracing the key patterns, symbols, and themes that bind the Bible together, this book will help you understand Scripture’s unified message and find your place in the great story of redemption.

What Is Biblical Theology? confirms Jim Hamilton’s reputation as a top-shelf thinker and a wickedly good writer. This slim volume builds on the presupposition that the capacious biblical narrative—sixty-six books written by numerous authors and including stories, poems, proverbs, letters, and apocalypses—possesses a deep inner unity. Its unity arises from its divine inspiration, and it is in fact the true story of the whole world. Hamilton teaches his readers to engage in biblical theology, allowing the biblical story to shape us and conform us to God’s will.

Bruce Ashford, provost and associate professor of theology and culture, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary

Theology is a word that comes with baggage. Most people, like me, find their brains shutting down a little at its mention, mainly because it stirs up the same sort of feelings as words like calculus and dentist appointment. But from the outset of this book James Hamilton assures us he’s not performing mental acrobatics (though I'm sure he could if he wanted to). Rather, he’s showing us that if the Bible is a story, and God is a storyteller, then biblical theology is less like math and more like literature; it’s less like a cold study of the chemical properties of paint and more like gazing at a Van Gogh. This is a book I wish I could have read a long time ago.

—Andrew Peterson, author, The Wingfeather Saga series

This short, accessible book shows how we can move away from making the Bible all about us, reducing it to just another self-help book. Anyone who reads What Is Biblical Theology? will begin to discover what the Bible is really about and will have more ‘Now I get it!’ experiences as it equips readers to trace the thematic threads and story-line resolutions of the Bible from beginning to end.

—Nancy Guthrie, author, Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament Bible Study series

James M. Hamilton Jr. is professor of biblical theology at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and preaching pastor at Kenwood Baptist Church. He is the author of God’s Indwelling Presence: The Holy Spirit in the Old and New Testaments and Revelation: God Speaks to the Churches in the Preaching the Word Commentary Series.

Run to Win the Prize: Perseverance in the New Testament

  • Author: Thomas Schreiner
  • Publisher: Crossway
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 128

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Scripture’s commands to persevere, and warnings of the consequences if we fail, have been met with apathy by some, and led others to doubt the state of their salvation. The fearful and eternal nature of these issues warrants careful examination of what the Bible says about perseverance. Thomas Schreiner once again tackles this difficult topic in Run to Win the Prize. Clarifying misunderstandings stemming from his more detailed treatment in The Race Set Before Us (IVP 2001), Schreiner draws together an illuminating overview of biblical teaching on the doctrine of perseverance.

Schreiner details how God directs the collective warnings and exhortations of Scripture toward believers as a means of preservation. We are to think of the call to persevere in light of the initial call to faith, both agents by which God leads us to final salvation. Those looking for a general treatment of the doctrine of perseverance will profit from the challenges and assurances in Run to Win the Prize.

The twin doctrines of assurance and perseverance are defined by our understanding of the gospel of Christ. In Run to Win the Prize, Tom Schreiner presents a masterful and faithful case for the doctrine of perseverance as set forth in the New Testament. The book is a must read for these times. A master New Testament theologian, Tom Schreiner offers an education in biblical interpretation and sound words of pastoral counsel. This concise book will help all believers run the race together.

Albert Mohler, President and Joseph Emerson Brown Professor of Christian Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Mature insight. Control of the sources. Satisfying interpretations. Schreiner takes a difficult topic and makes it look easy. Like the work of a master craftsman, this book will enrich understanding and inspire interpreters to see what is there.

James M. Hamilton Jr., Professor of Biblical Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; author, God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment

Understanding New Testament teaching of believers’ persevering in the faith to be saved has proved not only difficult, but has often led to excesses and imbalances. One imbalance ends up arguing that true believers can forfeit their salvation and be lost if they don’t persevere; the opposite imbalance suggests that professing believers are saved regardless of whether or not they persevere in belief and good works. Tom Schreiner has done a masterful job of charting a course through rich biblical teaching that avoids both of these excesses. Here readers will encounter both the joy of knowing that God will not fail to save those whom he has elected and brought to true saving faith, while at the same time they will face squarely the necessity of persevering faith, love and good deeds that mark those truly saved through Christ and His Spirit. Here is biblical balance, and more important, biblical fidelity. All who long to understand better the nature of Christian faith and good works will benefit greatly from this lucid and biblical treatment.

Bruce A. Ware, T. Rupert and Lucille Coleman Professor of Christian Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Thomas Schreiner (MDiv and ThM, Western Conservative Baptist Seminary; PhD, Fuller Theological Seminary) is the James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation and associate dean of the school of theology at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.