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Overview

Celebrate the 498th anniversary of the Reformation with the essential Lutheran Reformation Day Bundle and personalize your library with the study of five centuries of Lutheran history and theology. This bundle rounds your library out with systematic theologies, historical studies, theological studies, studies in biblical interpretation, ecclesiastical studies, historical sermons, and essential biographies. With a birds-eye view you’ll see the evolution and development of Luther’s thought through the centuries by the people that carry on his legacy and namesake. With classic works of Lutheran theology, history, and doctrine, this bundle equips you with some of the best Lutheran resources available.

The Logos Bible Software edition of the Lutheran Reformation Day Bundle streamlines and enhances your study. Bible passages link directly to your English translations and original-language texts, and important theological concepts link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches by topic to find what other authors, scholars, and theologians have to say about faith, Bible interpretation, justification, and more.

Interested in more works of Martin Luther? See The Precious and Sacred Writings of Martin Luther.

Product Details

  • Title: Lutheran Reformation Day Bundle
  • Volumes: 45
  • Pages: 14,282
  • Christian Group: Lutheran
  • Topics: Theology, Biblical Studies, History, Systematic Theology, Catechisms, Sermons, and more

Martin Luther’s Theology: Its Historical and Systematic Development

  • Author: Bernhard Lohse
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 296

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This definitive analysis of the theology of Martin Luther surveys its development during the crises of Luther's life, then offers a systematic survey by topics. Containing a wealth of quotations from less-known writings by Luther and written in a way that will interest both scholar and novice, Lohse's magisterial volume is the first to evaluate Luther's theology in both ways. Lohse's historical analysis takes up Luther's early exegetical works and then his debates with traditions important to him in the context of the various controversies leading up to his dispute with the Antinomians. The systematic treatment shows how the meaning of ancient Christian doctrines took their place within the central teaching of justification by faith.

Bernhard Lohse was one of the top Luther scholars in the twentieth century, and this book is the rich harvest of a lifetime of Luther study. It is the best survey of Luther's theology in any language and supersedes all previous studies...

—Scott H. Hendrix, Princeton Theological Seminary

Bernhard Lohse (1928–1997) was a preeminent church historian and Professor of Church History and Historical Theology at the University of Hamburg.

A History of Lutheranism, 2nd ed.

  • Author: Eric W. Gritsch
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 352

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In a clear, non-technical way, this noted Reformation historian tells the story of how the nascent reforming and confessional movement sparked and led by Martin Luther survived its first battles with religious and political authorities to become institutionalized in its religious practices and teachings. Gritsch then traces the emergence of genuine consensus at the end of the sixteenth century, followed by the age of Lutheran Orthodoxy, the great Pietist reaction, Lutheranism's growing diversification during the Industrial Revolution, its North American expansion, and its increasingly global and ecumenical ventures in the last century.

From Wittenberg to Tanzania, from Spalatin to Spener to Schmucker, Gritsch tells the story with clarity and verve. This new edition updates all the chapters with fresh research, adds a chapter on new global developments and issues, and adds a rich array of graphics and other teaching tools.

Eric Gritsch knows the core convictions of Lutheranism like few other scholars. This volume does a wonderful job of summarizing a complex story, reflecting the wisdom and learning of its author...

—Mark D. Tranvik, Professor of Religion, Augsburg College

Eric W. Gritsch is Emeritus Professor of Church History at Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary, Pennsylvania.

The Theology of Martin Luther

  • Author: Paul Althaus
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 1966
  • Pages: 464

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This is a comprehensive and systematic survey of Martin Luther's entire thought by an internationally recognized authority in the field of Reformation research. The main theological questions which engaged the Reformer's attention are set forth in clear and simple fashion, along with a host of quotations from this own writings to illumine the presentation. Scholars and laypersons alike will appreciate the more than a thousand instances in which the author allows Luther to speak forcefully and directly for himself.

It is likely to remain a standard source book for American theologians for some time to come.

Dialog

Paul Althaus was author of numerous books and articles, including Fact and Faith in the Kergma of Today and The Divine Command. He was Professor of Theology at the University of Erlangen, Germany.

Martin Luther’s Catechisms: Forming the Faith

  • Author: Timothy J. Wengert
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2009
  • Pages: 176

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Reformation scholar Timothy Wengert has studied Luther's catechisms for the light they shed on the maturing Reformation faith but also for the fascinating lens they afford into the social world of Wittenberg in those years: children, clergy, education and publishing, marriage customs, devotion and prayer, and celebration of the Lord's Supper in this period, along with Luther's own hearty faith, are all illumined by these Western classics.

In this volume, which also includes the texts of the catechisms, Wengert follows the traditional catechism order to demonstrate the dynamic faith exhibited in the catechisms in their original context and ours. An ideal resource for college and seminary classes, as well as individual and group reading, this volume will be a valued vehicle for understanding Reformation faith for many years to come.

In the risky sea of spiritual self-help books, Wengert's retrieval and exposition of Luther's basic educational tools is a pedagogical lifeboat. It will steer readers to a reform of intergenerational Christian education.

—Eric W. Gritsch, Professor of Church History, Lutheran Theological Seminary

Timothy J. Wengert is Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor of Reformation History at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia.

The Lutheran Confessions: History and Theology of The Book of Concord

  • Editors: Charles P. Arand, Robert Kolb, and James A. Nestingen
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 352

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From their formulation in the sixteenth century through the present day, every generation of Lutheran leadership has grappled with the centrality and importance of the Lutheran confessional writings. In this important new volume, Arand, Kolb, and Nestingen bring the fruit of an entire generation of scholarship to bear on these documents, making it an essential and up-to-date class text. The Lutheran Confessions places the documents solidly within their political, social, ecclesiastical, and theological contexts, relating them to the world in which they took place, and assists readers in understanding the issues at stake in the narratives, both in their own time and in ours.

Confessional commitment, ecclesiastical identity, and scholarly expertise characterize this concise, yet incisive, analysis of the historical setting and theological content of the Lutheran Confessions in light of contemporary scholarship. The volume serves as a valuable companion to The Book of Concord, and it will be a welcome resource for all students of the Lutheran confessional documents, both in the parish and in an academic setting.

—Kurt K. Hendel, Bernard, Fischer, Westberg Distinguished Ministry Professor of Reformation History, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago

In this volume, Arand, Nestingen, and Kolb, as internationally recognized premier scholars of the Lutheran Confessions, bring the harvest of the past quarter century research into the hands of readers. As they give a detailed historical account of the fascinating stories behind The Book of Concord with their own theological insight, readers will be drawn not only into the content but even more importantly into the mind of the Confessions and the way in which they taught and confessed Jesus Christ. The Lutheran Confessions: History and Theology of the Book of Concord will make a remarkable and lasting contribution to a new generation of students, scholars, and pastors, and assist them in confessing Christ in the twenty-first century America and the world.

—Naomichi Masaki, associate professor of systematic theology, Concordia Theological Seminary

Charles P. Arand is a professor of systematic theology at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. His recent publications include The Genius of Luther’s Theology.

Robert Kolb is Emeritus Mission Professor of Systematic Theology and director of the Institute for Mission Studies at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. Among his many publications are The Book of Concord and Martin Luther: Confessor of the Faith.

James A. Nestingen is emeritus professor of church history at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is a nationally recognized Luther scholar as well as a popular speaker and lecturer. Nestingen is the author of numerous books, including Martin Luther: A Life and Sources and Contexts of The Book of Concord.

The Book of Concord

  • Editors: Robert Kolb and Timothy J. Wengert
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2000

Commissioned in 1993, the print edition of this translation of The Book of Concord (which is the basis for the electronic version) brings a new generation of scholarship and sensitivities to bear on the foundational texts of Lutheran identity. The fifth English translation since 1851, the print edition succeeds that edited by Theodore Tappert published in 1959 by Muhlenburg Press.

A review of the text in light of a mountain of new scholarship and other factors dictated the new translation and apparatus, including changes in the English language over the past forty years, differences in the training and preparation of seminarians and pastors, limitations in the introductions and annotations to the various parts of the book, new knowledge of the history and theology of these very documents, and the occasional error in Tappert’s translation.

Kolb and Wengert’s team of leading Reformation historians was augmented by consultation with one hundred other scholars and teachers who use The Book of Concord continually, and two other teams of scholars who have reviewed the translations.

Robert Kolb is Missions Professor of Systematic Theology at Concordia Seminary, St. Louis.

Timothy J. Wengert is Professor of Church History at Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia and editor with Robert Kolb of The Book of Concord (Fortress Press, 2000).

The Substance of Faith: Luther’s Doctrinal Theology for Today

  • Authors: Dennis Bielfeldt, Paul R. Hinlicky, and Mickey L. Mattox
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 222

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p>This useful and insightful volume aims to illustrate, espouse, and renew the discipline of doctrinal theology, particularly as exemplified historically by Martin Luther and his theological reflection on the Trinity.

 

The authors, steeped both in Luther's works and in the doctrinal tradition, show how dogmatics in the Lutheran tradition entails a delicate juxtaposition of credal commitment, scriptural interpretation, and doctrinal elaboration. Their respective chapters retrieve surprising historical insights about Luther's own practice of doctrinal theology, the interaction of the credal and doctrinal dimensions with a nuanced hermeneutic of scripture, and the future shape of a doctrinal theology genuinely responsive to the gospel and the present age.

The Substance of the Faith addresses a topic that has become increasingly important in recent years within Luther research: Luther's essential reflections on Trinity and Christology. The authors' way of dealing with the core distinctions of these matters opens up their meaning to any interested reader and reveals their importance at the heart of Lutheranism and of Christianity itself.

—Anna Vind, Faculty of Theology, University of Copenhagen

Dennis Bielfeldt is Professor of Philosophy and Religion at South Dakota State University in Brookings.

Paul R. Hinlicky is Tice Professor of Lutheran Studies at Roanoke College in Virginia.

Mickey L. Mattox is Assistant Professor of Theology at Marquette University and a specialist in the theology of Martin Luther.

A Reformation Reader: Primary Texts with Introductions

  • Author: Denis R. Janz
  • Edition: 2nd
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Pages: 472

Although deeply political, economic, and social, the European Reformations of the sixteenth century were at heart religious disputes over core Christian theological issues. Denis Janz’s A Reformation Reader is unabashed in its generous selection of key theological and related texts from five distinct Reformation sites. Along with plenty on the late-medieval background, the Lutheran, Calvinist, Radical, English, and Catholic Reformations are all well-represented here.

Janz’s selection of more than 100 carefully edited primary documents captures the energy and moment of that tumultuous time. The new edition incorporates a dozen readings by and about women in the Reformation, adds a new chapter on Thomas Müntzer and the Peasants' War, and adds illuminating graphics.

Denis R. Janz is Provost Distinguished Professor of the History of Christianity at Loyola University, New Orleans. He is the general editor of A People’s History of Christianity series and author of Luther and Late Medieval Thomism, Luther on Thomas Aquinas, and World Christianity and Marxism.

Preaching at the Crossroads: How the World—and Our Preaching—Is Changing

  • Author: David J. Lose
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 124

Postmodernism. Secularism. Pluralism. These are the words often used to describe the tumultuous changes that have affected our culture and our churches. In this volume, David J. Lose examines what these words really mean—and what challenges and opportunities they provide today’s preachers. Taking preachers on a tour of the major cultural influences of the last century, Lose explains how these movements have contributed to the diminishment of the church. He also explores how they offer opportunities to cultivate a more vibrant and relevant faith in the twenty-first century. Filled with lucid analysis and practical suggestions, Preaching at the Crossroads invites preachers to reclaim the art of preaching the timeless gospel in a timely and compelling manner.

David Lose provides a brilliant cultural GPS for preachers who need help navigating the often bewildering claims of a post-Christian world. This essential book maps the subtle contours of the ground and charts clear and helpful paths for preaching.

—Paul Scott Wilson, professor of homiletics, Emmanuel College, University of Toronto

David Lose is a wise and experienced guide for the church as it walks the line between Christian tradition and the emerging postmodern world. He looks the most serious questions in the eye and does not flinch.

—Ronald J. Allen, professor of preaching and gospels and letters, Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis

No one thinks more clearly or writes more effectively about the place of preaching in a postmodern, secular, pluralistic world than does David Lose. This book shows a firm grasp of contemporary philosophy, biblical hermeneutics, and the challenges of digital culture. What is perhaps most impressive about this volume, however, is that, in a crowded marketplace of sermonic gimmicks and quick-fixes, Lose holds instead to a vision of preaching that is profoundly theological and centered on the gospel.

Thomas G. Long, Bandy Professor of Preaching, Candler School of Theology, Emory University

David J. Lose is president of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia. He is the author of Making Sense of the Cross, Making Sense of the Christian Faith, Making Sense of Scripture, and Confessing Jesus Christ: Preaching in a Postmodern World. He speaks widely in the United States and abroad on preaching, Christian faith in a postmodern world, and biblical interpretation.

Holy Conversation: Spirituality for Worship

  • Author: Jonathan Linman
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 224

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Despite widespread interest in spirituality, its most common corporate form, congregational worship, is rarely discussed in those terms. This book explores liturgical spirituality as a holy conversation between God and us.

Linking the themes of spirituality and worship and giving each needed focus in ways that are biblically and theologically rich and consistent with ecumenical traditions, this book specifically explores the relationship of sacred reading (lectio divina) to worship. Linman sees this practice as one element in the larger liturgical action of Gathering, Word, Meal, and Sending. Our “spiritual worship” (cf. Rom. 12:1), he argues, is the holy conversation between worshipers and the triune God who leads us to greater participation in Christ and to transformation through Christ’s presence.

Raising important issues for worship renewal and interspersed with practical insights and suggestions, this book serves as a primer for those who want to more fully learn how to worship, and, through the power of the Spirit, to deepen their awareness of the encounter with Christ made known in Word and Sacrament.

This is a book to be savored. By interpreting liturgy in light of the movements of lectio divina, Jonathan Linman offers a fresh approach to the dynamics of liturgy. Holy Conversation invites both those responsible for preparing for or leading worship and those yearning for a deeper spiritual experience in worship to listen and respond to the work of the Spirit and so to engage liturgy deeply and richly.

—Ruth Meyers, Hodges-Haynes Professor of Liturgics, Church Divinity School of the Pacific

This book beautifully embodies what it describes: attentive and reflective conversation with the reader about the ‘holy conversation’ that is liturgy. Liturgical theologians have focused on the meaning of liturgy’s deep structure or ordo; Linman presents a model for engaging the ordo and, in the process, richly redescribes the ordo itself. Holy Conversation is the next step in the study of liturgy.

James W. Farwell, professor of religious studies and philosophy, Bethany College, West Virginia

The heart of any authentic Christian spirituality is the church’s liturgical life, the feast of Word and Sacrament. Linman opens the contemplative experience of liturgical worship in new and deeply faithful ways, inviting an encompassing, personal ‘holy conversation’ with the One who is life for the world. A great gift.

—Lisa E. Dahill, associate professor of worship and Christian spirituality, Trinity Lutheran Seminary

Jonathan Linman is Bishop’s Assistant for Formation in the Metro New York Synod of the ELCA and adjunct faculty at General Theological Seminary in New York City. He holds his doctorate from Duquesne University.

Introduction to Christian Liturgy

  • Author: Frank C. Senn
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 256

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Designed as a general introduction to Christian liturgy, this book explores the meaning, history, and practice of worship in Eastern and Western, Catholic and Protestant traditions. Its chapters cover the theology of worship, the historical development of Eucharist and the Prayer Offices, the lectionary and customs of the church year, other sacramental rites, and the use of music and the arts. As such, it is a perfect textbook for students seeking to understand the basics of liturgical worship, as well as a reliable guide for worship leaders.

Written in the form of a handbook and designed with questions and answers for easy reference, Introduction to Christian Liturgy will help both novice and experienced worship leaders make informed decisions in their liturgical choices and practices.

In an appealing question and answer format, Senn has given us a catechism of worship that is simple, clear, and practical throughout, with his deep learning and his long experience as a parish pastor abundantly evident. The book is a treasure for all who care about Christian worship.

—Philip Pfatteicher, professor of English, East Stroudsburg University

Combining the skills of ecumenical scholar and experienced Lutheran pastor, Frank Senn has produced a wonderfully useful handbook for Christian liturgy. Pastors and students alike will benefit greatly from his careful and accessible survey of the tradition of Christian worship. The question and answer format should help readers to find needed information quickly.

—John Baldovin, professor of historical and liturgical theology, Boston College

Drawing upon his years of experience as a pastor of congregations and a teacher in graduate academic programs, Frank Senn has produced a liturgical primer—a ‘pastoral manual’—organized by theoretical and practical questions that shape the content of the book. The ecumenical range of the text, the consideration given to practices in local contexts, and the provision of learning aids, all make this a rich, accessible and helpful study book for classroom or personal use.

—Karen B. Westerfield Tucker, professor of worship, Boston University

Frank C. Senn is pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church, Evanston, Illinois, and has served as president of both the Liturgical Conference and the North American Academy of Liturgy. He is author of many books, including Christian Liturgy: Catholic and Evangelical, New Creation: Elements of a Liturgical Worldview, and The People’s Work: A Social History of the Liturgy.

The Theology of the Apostles: The Development of New Testament Theology

  • Author: Adolf Schlatter
  • Translator: Andreas Köstenberger
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 464

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The Theology of the Apostles is the second volume of Adolf Schlatter’s two-volume New Testament Theology. Here Schlatter explores how the New Testament writers used Christ’s teachings to formulate practical doctrines, and how they drew upon his life and work to establish core theological confessions.

There are certain writers of the past—Augustine, Calvin, Bengel, Westcott, Schlatter—to whom we shall always turn with gratitude for the timeless insights that are to be found in their writings.

—Stephen Neil, senior scholar, Wycliffe Hall, Oxford

Adolf Schlatter was theologically the most important figure in the faculty of Protestant theology at Tübingen in the first third of the [twentieth] century.

Peter Stuhlmacher, professor, Unversity of Tübingen

Schlatter’s writings hold rich potential for summoning serious biblical scholarship back to its classic sources, methods, and aims.

Robert Yarbrough, professor, Covenant Theological Seminary

The History of the Christ: The Foundation of New Testament Theology

  • Author: Adolf Schlatter
  • Translator: Andreas Köstenberger
  • Publisher: Baker
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 448

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Appearing for the first time in English, The History of the Christ is a translation of Adolf Shclatter’s first volume of his New Testament Theology series. This volume allows readers to access the foundational components of Schlatter’s understanding of how the New Testament writers thought about Christ, his teachings, and his work on the cross.

Because of his immense, unbelievable learning and his theological insights into the heart of the New Testament message, Schlatter’s Theology of the Apostles has been a standard work of New Testament research.

Martin Hengel, professor, Unversity of Tübingen

We should have listened to Adolf Schlatter’s profound and prescient voice more than we did in the twentieth century. This welcome new translation will help us do so in the twenty-first.

John G. Stackhouse, professor, Regent College

The excellent new translation will gain many new readers for one of the truly classic New Testament theologies. Careful readers will learn again and again from the genius, piety, and passion of this great theologian, especially in the area of Christian ethics.

—Robert Morgan, professor, Oxford University

Even those who disagree with Schlatter here and there will find their understanding of New Testament [t]heology mightily stimulated and enriched.

D. A. Carson,  professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

Martin Luther as Prophet, Teacher, and Hero: Images of the Reformer, 1520–1620

  • Author: Robert Kolb
  • Publisher: Baker Academic
  • Publication Date: 1999
  • Pages: 288

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Despite the vast number of studies concerning the life and teaching of Martin Luther, scholars have not previously considered the ways in which his contemporaries and successors used his influence in the German Reformation. Robert Kolb treats that subject in this well-researched volume on the continuing role of Luther’s legacy. The following generations of Reformers, he argues, used Luther in different ways as they sought to deal with the changed circumstances of the church in their own age.

Kolb suggests three categories to describe the ways in which Luther’s disciples used his influence and adapted it to the needs of the church in their respective ages: prophet, teacher, and hero.

  • Prophet—During his own lifetime and immediately thereafter, Luther was often identified with the biblical prophets as having a unique authority from God to challenge the place of the papacy.
  • Teacher—As internal conflicts and doctrines increasingly came to the fore, Luther was seen as the authoritative interpreter of Scripture whose writings could be cited as the definitive proofs on any disputed points.
  • Hero—By the end of the sixteenth century, much less emphasis was placed on Luther as a distinctive and authoritative prophet/teacher, and he was more often revered as the hero of the national church whose courage was celebrated in art and on stage.

The second section of the work focuses more particularly on the use and collection of Luther’s writings. Kolb recounts the stages of publication as Luther’s many treatises, pamphlets, and sermons were gathered for varying purposes. Collected editions were issued, and then topical and systematized selections were gathered for teaching and edification on specific topics. These stages of publication reinforce the author’s thesis concerning the changing use of Luther’s legacy. Over the course of the century, his writings were no longer cited as uniquely authoritative, rather they were used for edification—the prophet/teacher had become the national hero.

Students of Luther in particular and of the Reformation era in general will find this volume to be of great value. The author’s unique approach to Luther’s lasting legacy in the German church provides an entirely new perspective that moves scholarly discussion ahead significantly.

Robert Kolb’s study of changing interpretations of Luther’s life and work is a valuable contribution to Luther studies. In particular, it demonstrates the impact of Luther on German theological thinking since the sixteenth century.

—John Johnson, president, Concordia Seminary

Professor Kolb has woven a fascinating tale about the effect of Luther on his theological heirs. Here, in an easy-to-read, yet scholarly account, the reader is expertly led through a labyrinth of sixteenth-century Luther reception. Kolb’s grasp of the pertinent secondary literature and his command of a vast array of primary sources combine to reveal the variety of ways early Lutherans and others sought to comprehend how the Reformer had changed the religious and social landscape of the early modern German lands. This is a landmark study with which everyone interested in Luther studies will need to grapple.

Timothy J. Wengert, Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor of the Reformation History, The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia

Kolb’s study, written in his typically clear style and based on thorough research, is a valuable contribution to our understanding of the development of Lutheranism.

Sixteenth Century Journal

For anyone interested in ‘how Luther after his death continued to function as an authority, as a teacher, and as a hero for those who claimed his name’ and how Luther’s heirs conceived ‘the nature of authority within the church . . . in the midst of a changing society,’ Kolb’s study is both unique and indispensable.

Lutheran Quarterly

Kolb is a seasoned Reformation scholar and a leading expert on Lutheran developments in the century after Luther. His wide readings and careful research are reflected in this book, which does a real service in elucidating a complex but important period.

Religious Studies Review

Robert Kolb is emeritus mission professor of systematic theology and director of the Institute for Mission Studies at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri. Among his many publications are The Book of Concord and Martin Luther: Confessor of the Faith.

Reading the Bible with Martin Luther: An Introductory Guide

  • Author: Timothy J. Wengert
  • Publisher: Baker Academic
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 144

Prominent Reformation historian Timothy Wengert introduces the basic components of Martin Luther’s theology of the Bible and examines Luther’s contributions to present-day biblical interpretation. Wengert addresses key points of debate regarding Luther’s approach to the Bible that have often been misunderstood, including biblical authority, the distinction between law and Gospel, the theology of the cross, and biblical ethics. He argues that Luther, when rightly understood, offers much wisdom to Christians searching for fresh approaches to the interpretation of Scripture.

Timothy J. Wengert is a Ministerium of Pennsylvania Professor of Reformation History at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia.

The Self-Giving God and Salvation History: The Trinitarian Theology of Johannes von Hofmann

  • Author: Matthew L. Becker
  • Publisher: T & T Clark International
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 320

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Hofmann (1810–1877) was one of the most significant theologians of the 19th century and perhaps the century’s most influential Lutheran theologian. Matthew L. Becker introduces us to Hofmann’s Trinitarian view of God.

According to Hofmann, God freely chose to give himself out of divine love. Becker’s book centers on Hofmann’s understanding of history. In Hofmann’s Trinitarian kenosis, the eternal God has become historical by self-emptying God’s self into Jesus. For Hofmann, world history can only be understood within the historical self-giving of the triune God who is love. Thus, for Hofmann all of history is salvation-history, a kind of history that embraces and fulfills God’s purposes in the world.

Heilsgeschichte is the one German word every student of theology learns. Here Matthew Becker introduces us to the father of the ‘history of salvation’ way of thinking that Oscar Cullmann popularized in Christ in Time. An added bonus is Becker’s surprising thesis that, contrary to common opinion, Trinitarian theology was alive and well in the nineteenth century, prior to its alleged rebirth in the dogmatics of Karl Barth.

—The Rev. Dr. Carl E. Braaten, Executive Director, Center for Catholic and Evangelical Theology

Using the whole range of Hoffmann’s work, including the lectures on dogmatics that Hofmann left unpublished, Becker has written a book that makes a significant addition… to the extensive literature in German [on Hofmann]. The Self-Giving God and Salvation History ranges widely over Hofmann’s theology and his intellectual world – and digs deeply, with meticulous attention to detail. Professor Becker’s concern is not only to set the record straight on this often misunderstood theologian, but also to continue the critical engagement with his thoughts that began in his own day and to set them alongside the present-day theological discussion, which in some respects Hofmann anticipated.

—From the Forward by Brian A. Gerrish, John Nuveen Professor Emeritus, The University of Chicago Divinity School

Matthew L. Becker is Visiting Associate Professor of Theology at Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, Indiana. An ordained Lutheran minister, Dr. Becker has served congregations in Chicago and Oregon. He is a co-editor of God Opens Doors, a history of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod in the Pacific Northwest.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer 1906–1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance

  • Author: Ferdinand Schlingensiepen
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 472

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This volume offers a new comprehensive biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. Bonhoeffer has gained a position as one of the most prominent Christian martyrs of the last century. His influence is so widespread that over half a century after his execution by the Nazis, Bonhoeffer’s life and work are still the subject of fresh and lively discussion. As a pastor and theologian, Bonhoeffer decided to resist the Nazis in Germany, but his resistance was not solely theological. He played a key leadership role in the Confessing Church, a major source of Christian opposition to Hitler and his anti-Semitism and was principal of the secret seminary at Finkenwalde in Pomerania.

It was here that he developed his theological visions of radical discipleship and communal life. In 1938, he joined the Wehrmacht's “Abwehr,” the German Military Intelligence Office, in order to seek international support for the plot against Hitler. Following his inner calling and conscience meant that Bonhoeffer was continually forced to make decisions that separated him from his family, friends, and colleagues, and which ultimately led to his martyrdom in Flossenbürg concentration camp, less than a month before the Second World War came to an end. His letters and papers from prison movingly express the development of some of the most provocative and fascinating ideas of twentieth-century theology.

Sixty years after Bonhoeffer’s death and 40 years after the publication of Eberhard Bethge’s ground breaking biography, Ferdinand Schlingensiepen offers a definitive new book on Bonhoeffer, for a new generation of readers. Schlingensiepen takes into account documents that have only been made accessible during the last few years—such as the letters between Bonhoeffer and his fiancée Maria von Wedemeyer. Schlingensiepen’s careful narrative brings to life the historical events, as well as displaying the theological development of one of the most creative thinkers of the twentieth century, who was to become one of its most tragic martyrs.

When the last paragraph is finished, the reader is left with the sadness that such a grand Christian should have had his life so brutally ended, but also with a feeling of strange warmth in the fact of the great strength, the hope, faith, and love of the Lord Jesus whom Bonhoeffer served so loyally . . . Read this book and walk with him.

Methodist Recorder

One measure of a good biography is the degree to which it keeps this anachronistic tendency in check. When judged by this criterion, Ferdinand Schlingensiepen’s new book is without peer. The author’s knowledge of Bonhoeffer and his familiarity with the massive amount of research that has been done over the past 50 years are readily apparent, and they result in a clear and compelling picture of Bonhoeffer’s life, work, and witness . . . Schlingensiepen excels at navigating through the many settings, characters, and plots that converge to form the contours of this life . . . Schlingensiepen is equally masterful at relating the intimate relationships of Bonhoeffer’s life . . . We are in his debt for the good work that he has done, opening a new window into the remarkable life, witness, and scholarship of Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

The Christian Century

This new biography is one of the most important resources for taking us forward in dialogue with Bonhoeffer during the coming years.

—John W. de Gruchy, emeritus professor, University of Cape Town

Dietrich Bonhoeffer 1906-1945: Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance should be recommended to a wide readership. As a streamlined and updated account of Bonhoeffer, it is ideal for new readers of Bonhoeffer. For such readers, it offers comprehensive and nuanced accounts of Bonhoeffer’s cultural and political challenges. This biography also instantly becomes the starting point for those interested in Bonhoeffer, the man of resistance.

Political Theology

In fact, there are a number of excellent biographies that offer an account of Bonhoeffer’s life that is both thorough and engagingly readable . . . that capture the full sweep of his remarkable story. The best is Ferdinand Schlingensiepen’s Dietrich Bonhoeffer, 1906–1945, Martyr, Thinker, Man of Resistance . . . Ferdinand Schlingensiepen worked closely with Bethge and served on the editorial board of the sixteen-volume Bonhoeffer work. A nice bonus: He got permission from the Bonhoeffer family to print previously unpublished photographs.

—Charles Marsh, commonwealth professor of religious studies, University of Virginia

The time is long overdue for a good, shorter biography of Dietrich Bonhoeffer that has the depth and scope of the Bethge biography. Schlingensiepen has written it. His is accurate, thoughtful, and shows a solid grasp of the history of the churches under National Socialism—not surprising, since the author’s father was himself active in the Confessing Church. That’s important for understanding Dietrich Bonhoeffer as a person, for he was very much a product of his religious tradition and training as well as its most provocative critic and visionary. The portrayal of Bonhoeffer’s role in the Confessing Church (and his conflicts with it) is fascinating. The newer documents that have come to light since the Bethge biography, particularly the correspondence between Bonhoeffer and his fiancée, are referenced, giving more glimpses of Bonhoeffer’s personal development. This is a fine biography and important background reading for anyone who is reading Bonhoeffer’s theological classics, for it shows the life from which these classics emerged.

—Victoria Barnett, general editor, Dietrich Bonhoeffer Works

Ferdinand Schlingensiepen is one of the founders of the International Bonhoeffer Society. His father was principal of one of the seminaries of the Confessing Church. As a theologian and pastor, Schlingensiepen was a close friend of Eberhard Bethge. He has published widely on Bonhoeffer, Heinrich Heine, and the German novelist, Theodor Fontane.

Internal History of German Protestantism

  • Author: Karl Friedrich August Kahnis
  • Translator: Theodore Meyer
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 1856
  • Pages: 331

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In the early twentieth century, German theology was highly sought after for its impact on the Christian world, highly misunderstood because it was often so difficult to translate, and feared because of the massive ideological divisions arising in World War I. As access and exposure to German theology increased due to more translations being produced and more people learning German, it became apparent that this country’s theological writings had much to offer the whole body of the Christian church. As the British translator Theodore Meyer phrased it, “Germany [was], with an envious eye, looked to as the El Dorado where a youthful and free theology [was] thriving and prospering.”

Internal History of German Protestantism offers some of the finest historical records of Germany’s theological development, covering illuminism, “the renovation,” mediation theology, the church’s self-renovation, and the theologians who shaped Germany’s development and growth.

This book, which is not only written with a fresh vitality, energetic power, and deep interest and sympathy, but is also founded on the most thorough preliminary studies, honors its author as much as it does the cause of the church of which he is a minister, and from the bosom and heart of which this testimony has sprung forth. Two things, especially, distinguish this work—first, the decision, which does not in the least derogate from and compromise the cause of the Lord and His Church; and, secondly, the true impartiality, and the willingness, undisguised and confirmed by deed, joyfully, and without envy, to acknowledge all that is in any way commendable. And closely connected with this is his charity in judging of human weaknesses, errors, and mistakes, so that the saying of the old Roman poet: ‘Homo sum, et nihil humani a me alienum puto,’ is, in a Christian manner, confirmed and purified.

Zeitschrift für Lutherische Theologie u. Kirche

Karl Friedrich August Kahnis (1814–1888) was a German Neo-Lutheran theologian. He came from a poor background and was educated in Greiz. He then became a private tutor for a few years before studying theology at Halle. In 1860, he became canon of Meissen Cathedral and from 1864 to 1865 he was rector of Leipzig University.

Lutheran Theology

  • Author: Stephen D. Paulson
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 304

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This title offers an introduction for students and lay readers to doing theology in the Lutheran tradition. Lutheran theology found its source, and so its name, in Martin Luther in the sixteenth century. The theology that emerged identified two essential matters for the relationship between humans and God, the law and the gospel. It made a simple but extremely unusual and controversial claim—that it was not the law that made a person right before God’s final judgment, but the gospel of Christ’s death on the cross for sinners. This book will lay out the implications of having all theology confessed and delivered in two parts: the sinner and God (the justifier).

“Unwilling to neutralize the core Lutheran teaching that God is in the business of killing off sinners just so that new beings might rise in faith, Paulson holds the wider Lutheran tradition accountable to Luther’s own unique distinction of the law as accusation and the gospel as promise. Here we learn much of the Lutheran tradition—Paulson himself writes in the grand style of theological loci, approaching doctrine as outlined from Paul’s argument in Romans. Paulson’s approach to faith has an inerasable edge—if theology is to avoid being pointless, it must be for proclamation. Here is a theology beholden to God’s word that does what it says and says what it does—finally remaking humanity out of the nothingness of sin and death.

—Mark Mattes, professor of religion and philosophy, Grand View University

Martin Luther did not so much set out to reform the church as he did to reform preaching. Steven Paulson gets to the heart of Lutheranism—not as a denomination nor as a movement—but as the preaching of Christ crucified for the justification of sinners. Tracing the trajectory of Luther’s preaching in subsequent centuries, noting how it bumps up against attempts to domesticate its assertiveness or ground its doctrine according to one worldview or another, Paulson is persistent in following Luther’s own evangelical logic in making the necessary distinction between law and gospel, God hidden and God revealed, to provide contemporary readers with a vigorous introduction to the loci of Lutheran theology. With the epistle to the Romans as his framework, Paulson deftly gives an account of Luther’s confession of Jesus Christ and with precision and literary craftsmanship identifies the use (and misuse) of this theology in the church which bears his name.

—John T. Pless, assistant professor of pastoral ministry and mission, Concordia Theological Seminary

Looking over Martin Luther’s shoulder as he studies the Scriptures and into his heart as it hosts the battle between Satan’s deception and doubt and the Holy Spirit’s truth and trust, Paulson plunges into the depths of Luther’s way of thinking. He penetrates the Wittenberg reformer’s intricate yet simple address of the realities of human experience with the gospel of Jesus Christ. Throughout, he engages other representatives of Lutheran culture and tradition, critically and perceptively, as they repeated or departed from Luther’s insights. This volume aids twenty-first century readers in reaping a rich harvest from his insight for the proclamation of repentance and the forgiveness of sins in our day.

Robert Kolb, professor emeritus of systematic theology, Concordia Seminary

Stephen D. Paulson is associate professor of systematic theology at Luther Seminary

Luther: A Guide for the Perplexed

  • Author: David M. Whitford
  • Series: Guides for the Perplexed
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2011
  • Pages: 192

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This is an upper-level introduction to the German Reformer Martin Luther, who by his thought and action was a key pioneer in the Reformation movement. Martin Luther was one of the most influential and important figures of the second millennium. His break with Rome and the development of separate Evangelical churches affected not just the religious life of Europe, but also social and political landscapes as well. More books have been written about Luther than nearly any other historical figure. Despite all these books, Luther remains an enigmatic figure. This book proposes to examine a number of key moments in Luther's life and fundamental theological positions that remain perplexing to most students. This book will also present an introduction to the primary sources available to a student and important secondary works that ought to be consulted.

Martin Luther is for the most part fascinating, sometimes annoying, and for many people perplexing. David Whitford provides an insight to the reformer's biographical context, his theological foundations, and primarily his political theory. The basic nature of the content leads to an elementary understanding of Luther. At no point does Whitford evade discussing problems in Luther’s theology, instead inviting discussion with him concerning his interpretation. The book should be read by beginners in Luther studies, taking their first steps, as well by scholars who seek a fresh look on Luther.

—Volker Leppin, professor of church history, University of Tübingen

David Whitford’s graceful new study does exactly what its title promises: guide readers who have only a vague notion of Martin Luther through his life, ideas, and key writings. The book explains complex theological issues in clear, but not overly simplistic, language, and does not avoid the controversies in which Luther was involved, many of which remain matters of debate today: Do humans have free will? Does religion allow one to oppose the government? How should Christians regard the Jews? How should Christians regard—and treat—each other?

—Merry E. Wiesner-Hanks, department of history, University of Wisconsin

Venturing across centuries and continents to encounter great thinkers of the past always involves a cross-cultural experience, for which a guide is mandatory as we make the first trip. David Whitford takes twenty-first century readers without much background in the Europe of the sixteenth century in hand and offers views of Martin’s life and thought that provide a path into his world and way of proclaiming the biblical message to his contemporaries. Readers in conversation with the author gain facts and flavor as they move across the bridges he builds from now back to then.

Robert Kolb, professor emeritus of systematic theology, Concordia Seminary

David M. Whitford is professor of religion in Reformation studies at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. He is the author of Tyranny and Resistance: The Lutheran Tradition and the Magdeburg Confession and Reformation and Early Modern Europe: A Guide to Research as well as numerous articles on Reformation Europe. He is the associate editor of The Sixteenth Century Journal.

T&T Clark Companion to Reformation Theology

  • Editor: David M. Whitford
  • Series: Bloomsbury Companions
  • Publisher: T&T Clark
  • Publication Date: 2012
  • Pages: 520

This volume is a major reference work on all aspects of theology in the reformation period. Editor David M. Whitford assembles an able group of scholars to present a detailed outline of the Reformed tradition. The contributors guide the reader through the historical background and theological development of this rich heritage. Major topics of theology within the Reformed tradition are discussed, including human nature and the fall, election and justification, the sacraments, eschatology and the Antichrist, and much more. The essays provide a helpful guide to the major aspects of the historic Reformed faith and offer new insights that will generate further dialogue and refinement of the tradition.

David Whitford has succeeded in bringing those specialists together that have given in this book a full oversight of the theology of the Reformation in all of its variety. Latest results of research, a fine combination of theology and history, and an accessible style make this book into one of the leading handbooks on our way to 2017 and beyond.

Herman Selderhuis, professor of church history and church polity, Theological University Apledoorn, Netherlands

Whitford opens this overture to Reformation theology with a wise essay on how neophytes might take their first steps in the discipline. In what follows, eighteen seasoned pros weigh in with substantial contributions on the classical loci, salient themes, and neuralgic issues. A fine starting point for graduate students and seminarians.

Denis R. Janz, provost distinguished professor of the history of Christianity, Loyola University, New Orleans

David Whitford is professor of the history of Christianity at United Theological Seminary in Ohio. He is the author of Luther: A Guide for the Perplexed, Tyranny and Resistance: The Lutheran Tradition and the Magdeburg Confession, Reformation and Early Modern Europe: A Guide to Research, as well as numerous articles on Reformation Europe. He is the associate editor of The Sixteenth Century Journal.

Luther Discovers the Gospel: New Light upon Luther’s Way from Medieval Catholicism to Evangelical Faith

  • Author: Uuras Saarnivaara
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2003
  • Pages: 160

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In this text, Uuras Saarnivaara examines the question: when did Luther discover the gospel of free justification and salvation, and what did this discovery mean?

Uuras Saarnivaara (1908-1998) was born in Finland, and worked in parish ministry there. He received a ThD from the University of Helsinki, as well as a PhD at the University of Chicago, where he wrote his dissertation on Luther, the text included here. Saarnivaara was a prolific author, writing books including: Scriptural Baptism, Hath God Said: Who is Right—God or the Liberals?, Armageddon—Before and After, andThe Lutheran Confession and Martin Luther: Can the Bible be Trusted?

A Brief History of the Lutheran Church in America

  • Author: Juergen Ludwig Neve
  • Edition: 2nd, Revised and Enlarged
  • Publisher: The German Literary Board
  • Publication Date: 1916
  • Pages: 469

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After its first publication in 1903, A Brief History of the Lutheran Church in America quickly became a part of the curriculum in nearly all Lutheran theological seminaries in America. This second edition doubled the size of the original text as Juergen Neve gained access to a greater knowledge base and the demand became more apparent. Neve wished to provide an objective history of each synod in the American Lutheran church—one that wouldn’t magnify or minimize the merits of any in particular, including his own. To this end, he accepted a number of contributions from scholars and theologians more knowledgeable on the histories of particular synods Neve himself didn’t have access to, especially those that did not have previous historical literature.

Contributors

  • Professor Geo. J. Frischel
  • Professor E. Hove
  • Reverend J. A. Bergh
  • Professor G. M. Bruce
  • Professor Geo. Scerdrup
  • Professor P. S. Vig
  • Reverend O. Engel
  • Professor O. Lincke
  • Dr. A. G. Voigt
  • Professor L. Fuerbringer
  • Dr. G. A. Schodde
  • Dr. J. K. Nikander
  • Dr. B. E. Jonsson
  • Reverend G. Bessler

Juergen Ludqig Neve (1865–1943) was ordained as a Lutheran minister in 1888, and served as a professor of church history at the German Theological Seminary of the General Synod from 1887 to 1892. For the next seven years he was the pastor of Bremen, near Chester, Illinois, before returning to academia as professor of church history and symbolics at Western Theological Seminary in Achison, Kansas. In 1909, he became professor of symbolics and history of doctrine at Hamma Divinity School in Springfield, Ohio, where he served until his death in 1943. He is the author of Churches and Sects of Christendom, The Lutherans in the Movements for Church Union, Story and Significance of the Augsburg Confession on Its Four Hundredth Anniversary, and coauthor of A History of Christian Thought.

The American Lutheran Church: Historically, Doctrinally, and Practically Delineated

  • Author: Samuel Simon Schmucker
  • Publisher: Harbaugh & Butler
  • Publication Date: 1851
  • Pages: 280

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At the time Samuel Schmucker wrote The American Lutheran Church, over 30 million people identified themselves as Lutherans, and it was the third largest denomination in America. In spite of that, there were a number of reasons why the Lutheran denomination was widely misunderstood and misrepresented in America—namely a lack of understanding of German and denominational disagreements. The American Lutheran Church: Historically, Doctrinally, and Practically Delineated contains a series of discourses presenting the history of the Lutheran Church in America, the distinguishing features of the Lutheran Church, a biography of the Lutheran Church’s founders, Jesus’ presence in the Lord’ supper, the doctrinal basis and ecclesiastical position of Lutheranism, and the Lutheran Church’s obligations, error, and dangers.

In the Lutheran Church [Schmucker] is extensively and favorably known; and no man in this country has done more than he to elevate her character, and to advance her welfare. As a writer, he is able and clear. His style is chaste and easy, and his arguments strong and convincing. His ‘Fraternal Appeal’ to the American churches on Christian union, is a masterpiece, which, with his other theological and philosophical works, has made him extensively known, beyond the bounds of his own church, both in America and England.

—Harbaugh and Butler Publishing

Samuel Simon Schmucker (1799–1873) was a German-American pastor, theologian, professor, and president of Gettysburg Seminary. He taught for more than 40 years at Gettysburg Seminary and published more than 100 works, including translations. He was well known as a controversial theologian in the Lutheran church for his theological position on communion, denying consubstantiation in the Lord’s Supper and steering the Evangelical Lutheran Church closer to a Reformed understanding of communion. He wrote a number of books, including Evangelical Lutheran Catechism, Elements of Popular Theology, American Lutheranism Vindicated, and The Unity of Christ’s Church.

Formulators of the Formula of Concord: Four Architects of Lutheran Unity

  • Author: Ted Jungkuntz
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2001
  • Pages: 158

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For 400 years, the Formula of Concord has served as a major cornerstone of Lutheran doctrine. In this text, Ted Jungkuntz tells the story of the four chief architects of the Formula of Concord, providing fascinating insights into the personal lives of the men who shaped an important part of our Christian heritage. Of special interest is the never-before-translated diary of Nikolaus Selecker, one of the original formulators.

Studies in the Lutheran Confessions

  • Author: Willard Dow Allbeck
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 318

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This text is designed as a companion to the Book of Concord. It provides historical context for the formulation of the Book of Concord, an overview of the ecumenical creeds, studies regarding the origins of the Augsburg Confession and the Smalcald Articles, and information about the catechisms.

Willard Dow Allbeck served as Wittenberg Synod Professor of Historical Theology at Hamma School of Theology for over 30 years.

Lutheran DNA: Testing the Augsburg Confession in the Parish

  • Author: James G. Cobb
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Pages: 116

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Lutheran DNA takes the Reformation’s Augsburg Confession of 1530 and asks whether parish issues today continue to find expression through the lens of this historic writing. The Augsburg Confession is named in Lutheran churches as a clear expression of Christian belief and practice. How is it so today? Stories, illustrations, and reflections flow out of this parish pastor’s experiences as he reflects on meanings from Augsburg to Baltimore.

This book exhibits the heartbeat of Lutheranism in The Augsburg Confession of 1530. Its 28 “articles” disclose how Lutheran congregations around the world (with a steady membership of about 60 million) are to function in order to preserve their identity as healthy and effective disciples of Jesus Christ in the interim between his first and second coming. The author describes the theological pulsation in the form of personal stories and experiences, tested in various parish settings, and geared to make readers partners in catechetical and spiritual formation. The book lends itself well to parishioners concerned about their theological identity and rationale for mission.

Eric W. Gritsch, professor emeritus of church history, Gettysburg Lutheran Seminary

James G. Cobb serves with his wife Judy as co-pastor of Ascension Lutheran Church, Towson, Maryland. He has published sermon volumes, chancel dramas, journal articles, and a parish manual on entry issues for new pastors.

The Distinctive Characteristics of the Lutheran Church

  • Author: George Luecke
  • Publisher: Concordia Publishing House
  • Publication Date: 1920
  • Pages: 101

The Lutheran Church—founded by and taking its name from Dr. Martin Luther—is not a new church. It is an ancient church, restored and renewed by Luther’s 95 Theses. The Distinctive Characteristics of the Lutheran Church calls from the marvelous heritage of the Lutheran Church and lays out—in elegant concisiveness—its theological distinctiveness. Marrying historical interpretations to biblical evidence, this treatise defends and justifies Lutheran beliefs for both the scholar and the layperson. What is uniquely incredible about this volume, however, is its unique perspective on the growth, divisions, and movements of the Lutheran Church in America.

  • Part I: Distinctive Doctrines of the Lutheran Church
  • Part II: Confessions of the Lutheran Church
  • Part III: Distinctive Practices and Customs of the Lutheran Church
  • Part IV: Organization of the Lutheran Church
  • Part V: Divisions of the Lutheran Church in America

George H. Luecke (b. 1870) was a pastor at St. John’s Lutheran Church and professor at Concordia College in North Carolina. He was born in Wisconsin of German parents, and was a witness to the division of the Tennessee synod and the Missouri synod of the Lutheran Church. He later published Distinctive Doctrines and Customs of the Lutheran Church and The Way of Life.

The Doctrinal Theology of the Evangelical Lutheran Church

  • Author: Heinrich Schmid
  • Translators: Charles A. Hay and Henry E. Jacobs
  • Edition: 6th German, 2nd English
  • Publisher: Lutheran Publication Society
  • Publication Date: 1889
  • Pages: 691

The Doctrinal Theology of the Evangelical Lutheran Church produces a comprehensive look at the complete development of Lutheran theology through the turn of the nineteenth century. Heinrich Schmid draws from 10 Protestant scholastics, compiling a dogmatic volume on old Lutheran theology, citing Melanchthon, Chemnitz, Gerhard, Hutterus, Hafenreffer, Calov, Quenstedt, Baier, Hollaz, and König as Lutheranism’s primary post-Reformation theologians.

Originally titled Die Dogmatik Der Evangelisch-Lutherischen Kirche, this thorough volume represents the Lutheran Church’s mid-nineteenth-century teachings and doctrine. Since its first edition in 1843, this title has enjoyed such popularity that it has received five further editions and revisions, two English translation editions, and numerous reprints, republications, and redistributions.

Both as a work of great intrinsic excellence and as a standard representative of the older theology of the Lutheran church, the volume must be one of high value and interest, not only to Lutheran ministers and students, but to the clergy of other denominations.

—M. Valentine, chairman of the faculty of the Theological Seminary, Gettysburg

To direct the attention of the American public. . . to the rich treasures of the old Lutheran theology, and thus to make these generally accessible to the English-speaking portion of the Lutheran Church in America, is an extremely gratifying and thank-worthy undertaking, which is sure to have a blessed effect. For the older theology of our Lutheran Church needs only to be known to be respected, and indeed to be most highly respected.

—Sigismund Fritschel, professor, Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran German Synod of Iowa

Heinrich Schmid was a professor of theology at the University of Erlangen.

Evangelical Lutheran Catechism

  • Author: Samuel Simon Schmucker
  • Edition: 10th
  • Publisher: Lutheran Board of Publication
  • Publication Date: 1871
  • Pages: 124

In the popular question-and-answer format, the Evangelical Lutheran Catechism has answered questions about the specifics of the faith of the Evangelical Lutheran Church for more than 100 years. Samuel Schmucker, a preeminent theologian in nineteenth-century Evangelical Lutheran theology, provides theological teaching which is still referenced in the teachings of evangelical Lutheran synods today. Trace Lutheran thought back through the centuries using Schmucker’s catechism as a starting point.

Samuel Simon Schmucker (1799–1873) was a German-American Lutheran pastor, theologian, professor, and president of Gettysburg Seminary. He taught for more than 40 years at Gettysburg Seminary and published more than 100 works, including translations. He was well-known as a controversial theologian in the Lutheran church for his theological position on communion, denying consubstantiation in the Lord’s Supper and steering the Evangelical Lutheran Church closer to a Reformed understanding of communion. He wrote a number of books, including Elements of Popular Theology, American Lutheranism Vindicated, and The Unity of Christ’s Church.

Ecclesiologia: The Doctrine of the Church

  • Author: Franklin Weidner
  • Publisher: Fleming H. Revell
  • Publication Date: 1903
  • Pages: 120

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Ecclesiologia provides theology students with a concise explanation of the doctrine concerning the church. Weidner points out six divisions that this typically falls into: the doctrine of the church, the doctrine of holy Scripture, the Word of God as a means of grace, the sacrament of baptism, the sacrament of the Lord’s supper, and the doctrine of Christian ministry. This volume mainly focuses on the first division: the doctrine of the church. This text is the fruit of 20 years of discussions in the classroom, and is designed to serve as an outline for a theology teacher to use in class for lectures. Weidner based Ecclesiologia on Christoph Ernst Luthardt’s Kompendium der Dogmatik and Weidner’s own teacher, Charles Porterfield Krauth’s Manuscript Lectures.

 

In this volume [Weidner] treats in very concise yet lucid manner the doctrine of the Christian church, first that of the Nicene period, then that of the Church of Rome, and that of the churches of the Reformation.

Methodist Magazine and Review

. . . if one wants a concise, clear, and reliable putting of high church Lutheran ecclesiology, he can be commended to this meaty little book.

The Methodist Review

. . . useful to all who wish to see in brief space a comprehensive sketch of the various opinions that have been held as to the nature, organization, and government of the church.

Princeton Theological Review

Sermons on the Passion of Christ

  • Author: Martin Luther
  • Publisher: Lutheran Augustana Book Concern
  • Publication Date: 1871
  • Pages: 224

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Originally preached during the Easter season, these 13 sermons by Martin Luther detail the arrest, trial, suffering, crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus. Working through selected passages in the Synoptic Gospels, Luther constructs a vivid passion narrative with his characteristic verve, precision, and spiritual intensity.

Preaching in Hitler’s Shadow: Sermons of Resistance in the Third Reich

  • Author: Dean G. Stroud
  • Publisher: Eerdmans
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Pages: 215

What did German preachers opposed to Hitler say in their Sunday sermons? When proclaiming Christ could cost a pastor his life, what words encouraged and challenged him and his congregation?

Preaching in Hitler’s Shadow begins with an extended exploration of preaching inside the Third Reich that enables readers to better understand the danger each pastor confronted every time he went into the pulpit. Dean Stroud pays special attention to the role language played in the battle over the German soul, pointing out the use of Christian rhetoric in opposition to Nazi language.

The second part of the book presents 13 translated full-length sermons by a variety of preachers, including Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Karl Barth, Rudolf Bultmann, and others. A running commentary on each text offers cultural and historical insights. Each sermon is also preceded by a short biography of the preacher.

After his thorough and superb presentation of the historical context, Dean Stroud provides captivating examples of biblical preaching and prophetic witness by pastors of the Confessing Church in Nazi Germany. He leaves no doubt about the life–threatening crisis the Nazis presented to Germany and the church. Neither is there any doubt about the response of the prophets here brought to life. One is simply stunned by the courage of prophetic faithfulness and by the sheer power of the Word preached in persistent obedience and at enormous risk. Here are voices that cannot be stilled. . . . Preaching in Hitler's Shadow is simply a towering book. It will inform, provoke, unsettle, move, and inspire.

—Allan Boesak, cleric, politician, and anti-apartheid activist

Dean G. Stroud is professor emeritus of German studies at the University of Wisconsin in LaCrosse. As a former Presbyterian pastor, he has long been interested in sermons preached by opposition pastors in Hitler’s Germany.

Annotations on the Gospel according to St. Matthew, Part 1: 1–15

  • Author: Charles F. Schaeffer
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1895
  • Pages: 426

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The first volume of The Lutheran Commentary gives the first half of the Gospel of Matthew, written in the conservative approach taken by Charles F. Schaeffer.

Charles Frederick Schaeffer (1807–1879) was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, the youngest child of a distinguished Lutheran clergyman: Rev. F. D. Schaeffer, DD. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and served pastorates throughout New England before going on as a professor of theology at several universities in Pennsylvania. He served as the chairman of the faculty at the Lutheran Seminary in Philadelphia from 1864 until his death. He was known for his strictly conservative approach to Lutheran theology, advocating adherence to all the Confessions of the Lutheran Church. He is known for his translations of Kurtz’s Sacred History and of Lange’s Commentary on Acts.

Annotations on the Gospel according to St. Matthew, Part 2: 16–28

  • Author: Charles F. Schaeffer
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1895
  • Pages: 432

Charles Schaeffer continues his conservative, traditional exegesis of Matthew in the second volume of The Lutheran Commentary.

Charles Frederick Schaeffer (1807–1879) was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania, the youngest child of a distinguished Lutheran clergyman: Rev. F. D. Schaeffer, DD. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and served pastorates throughout New England before going on as a professor of theology at several universities in Pennsylvania. He served as the chairman of the faculty at the Lutheran Seminary in Philadelphia from 1864 until his death. He was known for his strictly conservative approach to Lutheran theology, advocating adherence to all the Confessions of the Lutheran Church. He is known for his translations of Kurtz’s Sacred History and of Lange’s Commentary on Acts.

Annotations on the Gospel according to St. Mark

  • Author: John A. W. Haas
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1895
  • Pages: 352

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Notable Lutheran theologian John A. W. Haas presents his exposition of the Gospel of Mark. This volume is slightly more scientific and technical than is the aim of the series; Haas focuses more on archaeological, geographical, philological, and historical commentary than the authors of the rest of The Lutheran Commentary.

John Augustus William Haas (1862–1937) was the president of Muhlenberg College. He was educated at the University of Pennsylvania, Mt. Airy Theological Seminary, and the University of Leipzig. He pastored at Grace Lutheran Church in New York City for eight years, and served another eight years as pastor at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in New York. He frequently contributed to a number of religious periodicals and is remembered as a forceful orator and leader in Lutheran thought in nineteenth-century America.

Annotations on the Gospel according to St. Luke

  • Author: Henry Louis Baugher
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 451

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The commentary on the Gospel of Luke serves to appeal to a wider audience while providing practical application and scholarly inquiry into the text. Despite having much in common with the Gospels of Matthew and Mark, Luke has much of its own material to merit the majority of the volume specifically appealing to Lukan studies.

Henry Louis Baugher (1804–1868) was an American Lutheran clergyman and scholar. He was president of Gettysburg College from 1850 to 1868. His presidency was noted by stern disciplinary practices and very high standards. At the ceremony opening the National Soldiers’ Cemetery, he gave the benediction following up after Abraham Lincoln’s famous Gettysburg Address.

Annotations on the Gospel according to St. John

  • Author: Adolph Spaeth
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 351

The most organic of the Gospels, John provides a towering literary importance in the New Testament, one in which The Lutheran Commentary aims to draw attention to. Adolph Spaeth sets forth his commentary on the Gospel of John as one continuous argument—evidenced by his style and language—based on homiletic exposition rather than hermeneutic.

Philipp Friedrich Adolph Theodor Spaeth (1839–1910) was a pastor in Philadelphia from 1864 to 1873, when he took up the role as professor at Lutheran Theological Seminary until his death. He was the president of the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church from 1880 to 1888. He was known as a gifted preacher and a scholar of liturgy and hymnology. He is also known for his biography, Charles Porterfield Krauth.

Annotations on the Acts of the Apostles

  • Author: F. W. Stellhorn
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 420

F. W. Stellhorn aims to make a plain, intelligible commentary out for public use in his exposition of the Acts of the Apostles. Special note is given to ethical and practical application of the Word of God in Stellhorn’s commentary.

Frederick William Stellhorn (1841–1919) was born in Brüninghorstedt, Germany, in 1841, and moved to the United States in 1854. He was a pastor at numerous Lutheran churches before taking the role as professor at Northwestern University in Watertown, Wisconsin. His other writings include other New Testament commentaries and a New Testament Greek lexicon.

Annotations on the Epistles of Paul to the Romans and 1 Corinthians 1–6

  • Author: Henry Eyster Jacobs
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 403

In researching Paul’s longest and best-known letters—Romans and 1 Corinthians—the editor of The Lutheran Commentary, Henry Eyster Jacobs, starts with the history of the early church and the writings of the early church fathers. This well-referenced commentary includes references to the impressive commentaries of Poole, Lange, Chrysostom, Stuart, Schaff, and many others.

Henry Eyster Jacobs (1844–1932) was an American educator and a Lutheran theologian born in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Pennsylvania College in 1862 and from the Lutheran Theological Seminary in 1865. He took up the position of professor at Pennsylvania College in 1870, and then appointed professor of systematic theology at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Mt. Airy in 1894. In 1920, he became president of the seminary. He published several histories of Lutheranism and commentaries on the New Testament, and, with John A. W. Haas, published The Lutheran Cyclopedia in 1899.

Annotations on the Epistles of Paul to 1 Corinthians 7–16, 2 Corinthians, and Galatians

  • Authors: Henry Eyster Jacobs, George Frederick Spieker, and Carl A. Swensson
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1897
  • Pages: 404

In researching Paul’s longest and best-known letters—Romans and 1 Corinthians—the editor of The Lutheran Commentary, Henry Eyster Jacobs, starts with the history of the early church and the writings of the early church fathers. This well-referenced commentary includes references to the impressive commentaries of Poole, Lange, Chrysostom, Stuart, Schaff, and many others.

Henry Eyster Jacobs (1844–1932) was an American educator and a Lutheran theologian born in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Pennsylvania College in 1862 and from the Lutheran Theological Seminary in 1865. He took up the position of professor at Pennsylvania College in 1870, and then appointed professor of systematic theology at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Mt. Airy in 1894. In 1920, he became president of the seminary. He published several histories of Lutheranism and commentaries on the New Testament, and, with John A. W. Haas, published The Lutheran Cyclopedia in 1899.

George Frederick Spieker (1844–1913) was a graduate of Baltimore City College and the Lutheran Theological Seminary. He received his ordination in 1867, and 20 years later received his doctorate of divinity. He was a professor of German and of Hebrew at multiple schools at various points of his life, and later became pastor of St. Michael’s Lutheran Church in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

Carl Aaron Swensson (1857–1904) was an American Lutheran clergyman and founder and president of Bethany College. His parents emigrated from Sweden, his father a minister of the Swedish Lutheran Church. Carl Swensson studied at Augustana College, received his PhD from the University of Upsala in 1893, and then his DD from Thiel College. He served on the General Council of the Lutheran Church in North America, on the Kansas Legislature in the Kansas House of Representatives, and on the Kansas Teachers’ Association. He was also a member of the State Historical Society, the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and the Building Committee for Sweden’s Building at the 1904 St. Louis Exposition; he was also a delegate to the Republican Convention in 1896.

Annotations on the Epistles of Paul to the Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Thessalonians

  • Authors: Edward T. Horn and A. G. Voigt
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 382

Edward T. Horn and Andrew G. Voigt contribute a high level of scholarship and research on these essential Pauline epistles, demonstrating the distinctiveness of Lutheran doctrine expounded by Lutheran scholarship in the New Testament.

Edward Traill Horn (1850–1915) was pastor of Christ Lutheran Church in Philadelphia (1872–1876), St. John’s Church in Charleston (1876–1897), and Trinity Lutheran Church in Reading (1897–1915). He also wrote numerous articles and books, including The Evangelical Pastor, The Christian Year, and Outlines of Liturgies.

Andrew George Voigt was professor of systematic theology and dean of the Theological Seminary in Columbia, South Carolina. He also authored A Primer of Lutheranism, Why We Are Lutherans, and Distinctive Doctrines of Lutheranism.

Annotations on the Epistles to Timothy, Titus, and Hebrews, and on Philemon

  • Authors: Edmund J. Wolf and Edward T. Horn
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1897
  • Pages: 519

This volume expounds the Pastoral Epistles in a unique way: “Mindful of the Lutheran impress which this commentary is to bear, I freely acknowledge that to this end my indebtedness to Lutherans, pre-eminently Huther and Delitzsch, is no greater than my obligations to the Anglicans Ellicott and Westcott and to the Reformed Van Oostersee and Ebrard. . .” The character of this commentary is thus more ecumenical and general in nature, providing insights to be cherished interdenominationally.

Edmund J. Wolf was professor of biblical and ecclesiastical history and New Testament exegesis at the Theological Seminary at Gettysburg. During the invasion of Pennsylvania by Confederate troops during the Civil War, he enlisted as a non-commissioned officer in the 26th Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia. He pursued his education at Tübingen and Erlangen Universities in Germany. He served as an editor for the Quarterly Review of the Lutheran Church and wrote numerous articles and publications for a number of encyclopedias, magazines, and reference works.

Edward Traill Horn (1850–1915) was pastor of Christ Lutheran Church in Philadelphia (1872–1876), St. John’s Church in Charleston (1876–1897), and Trinity Lutheran Church in Reading (1897–1915). He also wrote numerous articles and books, including The Evangelical Pastor, The Christian Year, and Outlines of Liturgies.

Annotations on the General Epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude

  • Author: Franklin Weidner
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1897
  • Pages: 380

Weidner’s contribution to The Lutheran Commentary was both the most-anticipated and the longest-remembered of the series. His commentary notes on the General Epistles and Revelation approach the subject with an appreciation for the writings of the early church and an eye for the textual discrepancies between surviving Greek manuscripts. His references to numerous commentaries of his day attest to the research supporting (and sometimes challenging) his verse-by-verse exposition.

Revere Franklin Weidner (1851–1915) was educated at Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, where he both graduated and was ordained in 1873. In 1887, he received his doctorate of divinity from Carthage College in Illinois, and became a tutor at Muhlenberg College in 1868. He went on to pastor Phillipsburg Lutheran Church from 1873 to 1878, and then taught English language and history at Muhlenberg College from 1875 to 1877. He was director of the Theological Seminary in Philadelphia in 1882 and frequently served as delegate on the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He was a member of the American Philological Association, the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis, and the American Oriental Society, and in his last years, served as professor of systematic theology and exegesis at Augustana Swedish-English Theological Seminary.

Annotations on the Revelation of St. John the Divine

  • Author: Franklin Weidner
  • Series: The Lutheran Commentary
  • Publisher: The Christian Literature Company
  • Publication Date: 1898
  • Pages: 365

Weidner’s contribution to The Lutheran Commentary was both the most-anticipated and the longest-remembered of the series. His commentary notes on the General Epistles and Revelation approach the subject with an appreciation for the writings of the early church and an eye for the textual discrepancies between surviving Greek manuscripts. His references to numerous commentaries of his day attest to the research supporting (and sometimes challenging) his verse-by-verse exposition.

Revere Franklin Weidner (1851–1915) was educated at Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, where he both graduated and was ordained in 1873. In 1887, he received his doctorate of divinity from Carthage College in Illinois, and became a tutor at Muhlenberg College in 1868. He went on to pastor Phillipsburg Lutheran Church from 1873 to 1878, and then taught English language and history at Muhlenberg College from 1875 to 1877. He was director of the Theological Seminary in Philadelphia in 1882 and frequently served as delegate on the General Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He was a member of the American Philological Association, the Society of Biblical Literature and Exegesis, and the American Oriental Society, and in his last years, served as professor of systematic theology and exegesis at Augustana Swedish-English Theological Seminary.

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