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The Works of the Reverend John Fletcher, vol. 1
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The Works of the Reverend John Fletcher, vol. 1

by

Carlton & Porter 1833

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$12.49

Overview

One of the first major Methodist theologians, John Fletcher was known by his contemporaries to be a humble man of great faith. A friend of John and Charles Wesley, Fletcher became an articulate defender of Wesleyan-Arminian doctrines, challenging the predominance of Calvinism among his peers. His writings and sermons, many originally written to defend John Wesley from attacks of heresy, influenced generations of theologians and preachers.

Volume 1 includes:

  • Five Checks to Antinomianism
  • The Fictitious and the Genuine Creed
  • An Equal Check to Pharisaism and Antinomianism, Part 1

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Save more when you purchase this book as part of The Works of the Reverend John Fletcher collection.

Key Features

  • Presents Fletcher’s response to Antinomianism
  • Includes a detailed table of contents
  • Presents a valuable resource for pastors, students, and scholars

Product Details

About John Fletcher

John Fletcher was born in Nyon, Switzerland in 1729. Educated in Geneva, Fletcher was ordained in 1752. He married Mary Bosanquet who became the first female preacher authorized by John Wesley to preach. For twenty-five years (1760–1785) Fletcher served as the vicar of the parish of Madeley. Although he was the "Arminian of Arminians" and preached against Calvinism, Fletcher was remembered by followers and detractors as "not a polemist, but always treated his opponents with fairness and courtesy." (D. S. Schaff)

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