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A School Grammar of Attic Greek
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A School Grammar of Attic Greek

by

D. Appleton and Company 1902

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$9.99

Overview

Written to replace the grammars of William W. Goodwin, and Hadley and Allen, Thomas Dwight Goodell’s A School Grammar of Attic Greek takes a different approach designed to clarify syntax for students who struggle with thinking in English while attempting to read and write in Greek. Goodell allows extant lexicons and teacher-led classroom discussion to provide information about prepositions, while he focuses on other elements of the learning process.

Gain insight into the unique grammatical concepts of Attic Greek—including declension of nouns and verb conjugation—and accelerate your learning with Goodell’s inventive approach to syntactical rules. The combination of world-class instruction and accessibility makes this Greek grammar a unique and helpful addition to any Greek student’s library.

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Practice your Greek with the Greek Classics Research Library.

Key Features

  • Emphasizes simplified grammatical statements for easier comprehension
  • Draws on students’ exposure to Latin as an aide to learning Greek
  • Focuses on helping students think in Greek

Product Details

About Thomas Dwight Goodell

Thomas Dwight Goodell (1854–1920) was Lampson Professor of Greek at Yale University. He also served as professor in residence at the American School in Athens for 1894–1895 and president of the American Philological Association in 1912. His love of the classics and Plato led him to contributing to classical Greek scholarship.

Sample Pages from the Print Edition

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