Faithlife Corporation
The Great Educators (10 vols.)
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Overview

Explore the development of education in the Western world. This series traces the history of teaching and learning methodologies—from the ancient world, to the first Christian schools, to the foundation and growth of universities, to the great modern movements of the nineteenth century.

Delve into the genesis of Aristotle’s theories, explore Alcuin of York’s contributions to schools, and learn how theologian Peter Abelard contributed to the development of universities. Additionally, you’ll see how Horace Mann’s crusade to make education available for all led to the establishment of public schools, understand how the concept of kindergartens became so popular, and investigate the heated debate surrounding Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s educational theories.

More than biographies of the individuals who shaped education in the Western world, this series offers a window into the history of Western thought. Each volume delves into the myriad questions surrounding the philosophy of education, such as: What is the purpose of education? Who should receive it? How should we teach? This series dives into these questions, and more, offering unique perspectives that will interest the educator, philosopher, and historian alike.

In the Logos editions, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Powerful searches help you find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Gain insight into history’s greatest thinkers with the Classic Quotations Collection!

Key Features

  • Traces the history of Western education
  • Presents biographies of people who shaped Western education
  • Explores connections between pedagogical methods, culture, and society

Praise for the Print Edition

Admirably conceived in a truly philosophic spirit and executed with unusual skill. It is rare to find books on pedagogy at once so instructive and so interesting.... I hope to read them all, which is more than I can say of any other series.

—William Preston Johnston, former president, Tulane University

The Scribners are rendering an important service to the cause of education in the production of The Great Educators series.

Journal of Education

Product Details

  • Title: The Great Educators
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Volumes: 10
  • Pages: 3,001
  • Resource Type: Biographies
  • Topic: History

Individual Titles

Horace Mann and the Common School Revival in the United States

  • Author: B.A. Hinsdale
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1900
  • Pages: 348

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Often referred to as “the father of American public education,” Horace Mann crusaded to make universal public education available across the state of Massachusetts. Mann’s efforts won great approval, and other states quickly adopted his model. Author B.A. Hinsdale draws from Mann’s diaries and personal letters, painting a compelling portrait of Horace Mann, his educational views, and the world in which he lived and worked.

B.A. Hinsdale (March 31, 1837–November 29, 1900) studied at the Western Reserve Collegiate Institute and Hiram College. He served as the chair of history, political economy, and governmental science at Alliance College; the chair of philosophy, history, and biblical literature at Hiram College, of which he eventually became president; and the chair of science and the art of teaching in the University of Michigan. His works include Schools and Studies, The American Government, How to Study and Teach History, Jesus as a Teacher, and Teaching the Language Arts.

Thomas and Matthew Arnold and Their Influence on English Education

  • Author: Joshua Fitch
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1899
  • Pages: 310

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Author Joshua Fitch, a longtime colleague of Matthew Arnold in the British educational department, provides a fascinating account of the impact of Matthew and Thomas Arnold on educational systems of Great Britain.

Thomas Arnold was a headmaster of Rugby School. Under his leadership, the students and faculty flourished and Rugby School became the model for other English public and boarding schools throughout the Western world. Thomas Arnold’s son, Matthew, served as an inspector of schools for 35 years, and crusaded for improved secondary education in England. Through his efforts, English literature was established as a core subject.

Dr. Fitch seems the fittest person by reason of his spiritual sympathy with [Thomas Arnold] and his personal association with [Matthew Arnold], to sketch in this brief way the two most typical modern English educators. And he has done his work almost ideally well within his limitations of purpose. . . . The two men live in these pages as they were.

Educational Review

Joshua Fitch (February 13, 1824–July 14, 1903) received his BA and MA in classics from the University of London. He served as both vice principal and, later, principal of the Borough Road Training College. He was also the chief inspector of schools for East Lambeth. His other works include Educational Aims and Methods, Lectures on Teaching, and The Art of Questioning.

Aristotle and the Ancient Educational Ideals

  • Author: Thomas Davidson
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 287

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Drawing from ancient texts, Thomas Davidson explores ancient Greek education both before and after the time of Aristotle. Davidson delves into the foundations of Aristotle’s theories, as well as their influence on Greek culture. He also illustrates the connections between Greek educational, social, and political life; revealing how each impacts and reflects the others. Davidson also includes an overview of the seven liberal arts, based on areas of knowledge and study emphasized during classical antiquity.

I am very glad to see this excellent contribution to the history of education. Professor Davidson’s work is admirable. His topic is one of the most profitable in the entire history of culture.

—W.T. Harris, former United States Commissioner of Education

Aristotle is delightful reading. I know nothing in English that covers the field of Greek education so well.

—G. Stanley Hall, former president, Clark University

Thomas Davidson (October 25, 1840–September 14, 1900) studied at Aberdeen University. Following graduation, he became the rector of Old Aberdeen’s grammar school. He wrote and travelled extensively. His works include The Place of Art in Education; Giordano Bruno, and the Relation of His Philosophy to Free Thought; Hand-Book to Dante, from the Italian of Scartazzini, with Notes and Additions; Prolegomena to Tennyson’s In Memoriam; and The Education of the Greek People and its Influence on Civilization.

Alcuin and the Rise of the Christian Schools

  • Author: Andrew Fleming West
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 232

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Trace the history of educational institutions in Europe, from the beginning of Christian education, to the origin of universities, to the first whispers of the modern movement. Alcuin of York’s contributions to education in France—popularizing the teaching of the seven liberal arts—offer a particularly interesting focus point for this arc of educational development.

I take pleasure in saying that Alcuin seems to me to combine careful, scholarly investigation with popularity, and condensation with interest or detail, in a truly admirable way.

—G.T. Ladd, Emeritus Clark Professor of Metaphysics and Moral Philosophy, Yale

Andrew Fleming West (May 17, 1853—December 27, 1943) studied at Princeton University and Centre College. He served as Giger Professor of Latin and dean of the graduate school at Princeton. He was also president of the American Philological Association, a trustee of the American Academy in Rome, one of the founders of the American School of Classical Studies in Rome, and the principal founder of the American Classical League.

Abelard and the Origin and Early History of Universities

  • Author: Gabriel Compayré
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1902
  • Pages: 350

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Gabriel Compayré investigates the life and influence of the medieval philosopher and theologian, Peter Abelard. In doing so, Compayré also explores the foundations of university education in Europe, in which Abelard played a significant role.

Abelard may fairly be called the founder of university education in Europe, and we have in this volume a description of his work and a careful analysis of his character. As the founder of the great Paris University in the thirteenth century the importance of his work can hardly be overestimated. The chapter devoted to Abelard himself is an intensely interesting one, and the other chapters are of marked value, devoted as they are to the origin and early history of universities. . . . The volume is a notable educational work.

Boston Daily Traveler

Gabriel Compayré (January 2, 1843–February 24, 1913) studied at the École Normale Superieure, later becoming professor of philosophy. He also served as a member of the Academy of Moral and Political Sciences. His works include Histoire Critique des Doctrines de l'éducation en France; Elements d'éducation Civique et Morale; Cours, de Pedagogie Theorique et Pratique; and The Intellectual and Moral Development of the Child.

Loyola and the Educational System of the Jesuits

  • Author: Thomas Hughes
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1912
  • Pages: 332

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

This work outlines the educational principles and method adopted in the Society of Jesus. Author Thomas Hughes, himself a distinguished member of the Jesuits, provides keen analysis and insights into the pedagogical views. Hughes first provides a biographical and historical portrait of Ignatius, the founder of the order, his comrades, and the establishment and early administrations of the society. Next, he analyzes the system of studies, beginning with an account of Aquaviva and the Ratio Studiorum, then detailing the courses of literature, philosophy, divinity, and allied sciences. Lastly, he describes school management, examinations, courses, grades, and graduation.

This volume . . . will probably be welcomed by others besides those especially interested in the theories and methods of education. Written by a member of the Jesuit Society, it comes to us with authority, and presents a complete and well-arranged survey of the work of educational development carried out by Ignatius and his followers.

London Saturday Review

Thomas Hughes was a member of the Jesuit Society. He is also the author of A History of the Society of Jesus in North America, Colonial and Federal.

Froebel and Education through Self-Activity

  • Author: H. Courthope Bowen
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1897
  • Pages: 236

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Friedrich Froebel, founder of the kindergarten movement, advocated for active early child learning. Author H. Courthope Bowen, both a student of Froebel’s principles and an experienced kindergarten educator, provides an overview and analysis of Froebel’s theories, as well as practical applications.

No one, in England or America, is fitted to give a more sympathetic or lucid Interpretation of Froebel than Mr. Courthope Bowen. . . . Mr. Bowen’s book will be a most important addition to any library, and no student of Froebel can afford to do without it.

—Kate Douglas Wiggin, author, Kindergarten Principles and Practice

H. Courthope Bowen is also the author of English Grammar for Beginners, Blossom from an Orchard, and Commercial Education, its Course of Study, and the Preparation Needed for This.

Herbart and the Herbartians

  • Author: Charles De Garmo
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1896
  • Pages: 296

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Author Charles De Garmo provides a systematic analysis of the Herbartian theory of education, both as presented by Herbart and his successors. De Garmo also provides an exposition of significant questions surrounding the teaching and learning process, as well as the debate over which subjects should be incorporated in a child’s education.

Some one has said there can be no great need without the means of supplying such need, and no sooner did the fraternity realize its need of a knowledge of the essentials of Herbart than Dr. De Garmo’s excellent work on Herbart and the Herbartians, by Scribner’s Sons of New York, appeared, a book which . . . gives all that the teacher really needs, and gives it with devout loyalty and sensible discrimination.

Journal of Education

Charles De Garmo (January 7, 1849–May 14, 1934) studied at Illinois State Normal University and the University of Halle. He served as professor of modern languages and reading at Illinois State Normal University, president of Swarthmore College, and professor of education at Cornell University.

Rousseau and Education according to Nature

  • Author: Thomas Davidson
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1900
  • Pages: 278

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Drawing from Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s works, author Thomas Davidson investigates Rousseau’s perspectives on the nature of modern, romantic, and unsocial education. Davidson argues that Rousseau’s ideal of natural education is harmful, as it attempts “to discredit human reason” and replace it with “infectious emotion, and to pave the way for a return to obscurantism and superstition.”

Thomas Davidson (October 25, 1840–September 14, 1900) studied at Aberdeen University. Following graduation, he became the rector of Old Aberdeen’s grammar school. He wrote and travelled extensively. His works include The Place of Art in Education; Giordano Bruno, and the Relation of His Philosophy to Free Thought; Hand-Book to Dante, from the Italian of Scartazzini, with Notes and Additions; Prolegomena to Tennyson’s In Memoriam; and The Education of the Greek People and its Influence on Civilization.

Pestalozzi and the Foundation of the Modern Elementary School

  • Author: A. Pinloche
  • Editor: Nicholas Murray Butler
  • Series: The Great Educators
  • Publisher: Charles Scribner’s Sons
  • Publication Date: 1901
  • Pages: 332

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Author A. Pinloche writes “We may indeed declare, without fear of exaggeration, that before Pestalozzi popular education did not exist at all.” Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi was a Swiss teacher and education reformer who worked to make education available to children of low socioeconomic statuses. His educational philosophy was based upon the idea that human nature was good and he believed that all aspects of a child’s life must be taken into consideration when teaching him or her, as they contribute to the formation of his or her personality, character, and reason. In this work, Pinloche explores Pestalozzi’s life, educational views, and lasting legacy.

A. Pinloche (March 14, 1856–July 5, 1938) was a professor of language and German literature. He taught at Lycée Charlemagne and École Polytechnique. His works include Leçons Pratiques de Langues Allemandes, Des Limites de la Méthode Directe, and Nouvelle Pédagogie des Langues Vivantes.

About Nicholas Murray Butler

Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862—December 7, 1947) served as Columbia University’s president for 44 years. He was also the president of the Industrial Education Association, president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1931 for his work in international arbitration.