Faithlife Corporation
  1. Get 20% off Logos 7—the biggest base package discount we’ve offered in years.
Resource Experts

Please note: This product does not contain the Ancient Literature Dataset from Logos 6. To get the Ancient Literature tooling for your software, you’ll need to upgrade to Logos 7 Silver or higher.

Overview

Connect any Bible verse with ancient Jewish and Christian parallels and allusions. The Ancient Literature Collection presents a comprehensive library of resources that populate your Passage Guide with ancient parallels, quotations, and allusions from the Apostolic Fathers, the Talmud, the Mishnah, apocryphal writings, and more. Instantly see any verse’s interpretation, application, and reuse throughout the ancient world.

These ancient religious texts bring key citations and references to your study of Scripture, opening up a new level of connectivity for your research. With 25 volumes covering Ugaritic and Mesopotamean religious parallels to New Testament apocryphal stories and early church writers, you’ll never run short on texts from which your study can draw insight.

Curious how these resources work in Logos 6? Watch the video below to see for yourself where you’ll be using them:

Key Features

  • Contains Logos resources with extensive Ancient Literature tagging
  • Relates implied and explicit parallels from Scripture
  • Uncovers cultural and theological similarities between ancient religious texts

Product Details

Ancient Near Eastern Texts

  • Author: James B. Pritchard
  • Edition: 3rd with Supplement
  • Publisher: Princeton
  • Publication Date: 1969
  • Pages: 735

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

The Ancient Near Eastern Texts brings together the most important historical, legal, mythological, liturgical, and secular texts of the ancient Near East, with the purpose of providing a rich contextual base for understanding the people, cultures, and literature of the Old Testament. A scholar of religious thought and biblical archaeology, James Pritchard recruited the foremost linguists, historians, and archaeologists to select and translate the texts. The goal, in his words, was "a better understanding of the likenesses and differences which existed between Israel and the surrounding cultures."

Before the ANET—as it is fondly referred to—students of the Old Testament were disposed to search out scattered books and journals in various languages to find what this essential resource offers: invaluable documents, in one place and in one language. As one reviewer put it, "This great volume is one of the most notable to have appeared in the field of Old Testament scholarship this century."

Pritchard's ANET, a standard reference for those examining the cultural setting of the Bible, contains translations of many important inscriptions which shed light on otherwise mysterious Bible customs. Included are such things as the Epic of Gilgamesh (containing our oldest Flood parallels), the Nuzi Texts (which, among others, help us understand the life of Jacob), various ancient law codes which have parallels to the biblical code, an early Palestinian ostraka, a wide selection of Egyptian and Akkadian oracles and prophecies, and even a Sumerian lullaby.

[A] very useful book, soundly conceived, competently edited, and beautifully printed. It offers in translation texts of the most important documents which throw light on the Near East background of the Old Testament. As a source book it will be welcomed not merely by Biblical students, but by all ancient historians who concern themselves with the cultures anterior to those of Greece and Rome.

Archaeology

James Bennett Pritchard (1909–1997) was an American archaeologist who excavated in Israel, Canaan, Egypt, Assyria, and Babylon. He received his PhD and taught Religious Thought at the University of Pennsylvania, and was the first curator of Biblical Archaeology at the university’s museum. His last major excavation was at Sarafand, Lebanon (1969–1974), which revealed the ancient Phoenician city of Sarepta. It was the first time a major Phoenician city situated in the Phoenician heartland had been fully excavated. He was President of the Archaeological Institute of America in 1972–1973, and the recipient in December 1983 of the institute’s prestigious Gold Medal for Distinguished Archaeological Achievement. His major focus throughout his career concerned the relation between material remains and written texts within the context of biblical studies. Pritchard served as editor and consultant to the American Philosophical Society, the American Oriental Society, the National Geographic Society, and the Archaeological Institute of America.

Canonical Compositions from the Biblical World

  • Editors: William W. Hallo and K. Lawson Younger, Jr.
  • Series: The Context of Scripture
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 1997
  • Pages: 599

Volume I is devoted to 'literary' texts: those responses to the world about them by which the creative minds of antiquity sought to come to terms with their environment, real or imaginary.

Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World

  • Editors: William W. Hallo and K. Lawson Younger, Jr.
  • Series: The Context of Scripture
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 2000
  • Pages: 438

Volume II is devoted to building and votive inscriptions, seals, weights, treaties, collections of laws, and other genres originally inscribed on durable mediums or in multiple copies for long-term survival. Many are royal inscriptions, and nearly all are crucial to the reconstruction of the history of the Biblical world.

Archival Documents from the Biblical World

  • Editors: William W. Hallo and K. Lawson Younger, Jr.
  • Series: The Context of Scripture
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 406

Volume III provides a generous selection from the vast number of legal, commercial and private documents preserved from pre-classical antiquity. These courtcases, contracts, accounts and letters, so often slighted or underrepresented in older anthologies, throw a bright light on the daily life of ordinary human beings as recorded by their contemporaries. In addition, exhaustive indices to all three volumes identify and classify all proper names and many of the themes struck throughout the work.

Religious Texts from Ugarit, Second Edition

  • Author: N. Wyatt
  • Publisher: Sheffield Academic Press
  • Publication Date: 2002
  • Pages: 505

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Religious Texts from Ugarit contains accurate and readable English translations of the most important religious texts, along with extensive notes, making these texts accessible to the English reader.

Ras Shamra Parallels: The Texts from Ugaritic and the Hebrew Bible (3 vols.)

  • Publisher: Pontificio Istituto Biblico
  • Publication Date: 1972–1981
  • Pages: 1,663

These outstanding volumes form a bridge between Ugaritic studies and biblical studies. The Ras Shamra Parallels describe and index features in the Ugaritic tablets that shed some light on the Hebrew Bible. Features indexed include: poetic parallel pairs, professions, institutions, political and foreign affairs, literary genres, place names, words, phrases, flora, fauna, minerals, divine names and narrative structures.

The Amarna Letters

  • Author: William L. Moran
  • Publisher: John Hopkins University Press
  • Publication Date: 1992

The Amarna Letters consist of diplomatic correspondence of Canaanite and other rulers with the Egyptian Pharaoh. Dating to the 14th century B.C., these letters are primary source material for the political and military situation of Canaan and the ancient Near East roughly in the age of Moses and the Exodus. This translation, by Assyriologist and Amarna expert William Moran, is the standard English edition, with introduction, extensive notes, and commentary. This work is an essential resource for the study of the Egyptian New Kingdom as well as of Syria-Palestine in the late Bronze Age. It will be of interest both to scholars of the ancient Near East and to students of the Bible.

Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations

  • Authors: H.H. Hardy II, Charles Otte III, and Michael S. Heiser
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2008

This ground-breaking compilation of ancient texts includes Hebrew, Aramaic, and Canaanite Inscriptions. Each text is accompanied by an English translation. The Semitic Inscriptions: Analyzed Texts and English Translations would be extremely expensive to assemble in print form—and now Lexham Press brings them to you in a morphologically-tagged electronic edition!

Contents:
  • The Hebrew and Canaanite Inscriptions
  • The Hebrew and Canaanite Inscriptions in English Translation
  • Glossary to the Hebrew and Canaanite Inscriptions
  • Glossary of the Morphological Terms in the Hebrew and Canaanite Inscriptions
  • The Aramaic Inscriptions
  • The Aramaic Inscriptions in English Translation
  • Glossary to the Aramaic Inscriptions
  • Glossary of the Morphological Terms in the Aramaic Inscriptions

The Apostolic Fathers in English

  • Author: Rick Brannan
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2012

The “Apostolic Fathers” wrote what has become some of the most important literature in the early church—letters and epistolary documents, homilies and theological tracts, documents on church order, and apocalyptic literature. In fact, some texts came close to inclusion in the New Testament canon. Tertullian regarded Hermas as Scripture, Irenaeus treated 1 Clement as canonical, and Origen regarded the Didache as inspired. Barnabas and Hermas were included in Codex Sinaiticus and 1 and 2 Clement were included in Codex Alexandrinus. The near-canonical status of the writings of the Apostolic Fathers in the early church makes their importance for modern study undisputed.

Rick Brannan has been reading, studying, translating, writing, and blogging about the Apostolic Fathers for years. He edited An English-Greek Reverse Interlinear of the Apostolic Fathers and The Lexham English Bible English-Greek Reverse Interlinear of the New Testament. He has published articles in Bible Study Magazine and presented on matters of Greek grammar and syntax at national meetings for the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) and the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS). He also presented at the Bible Technologies Conference, BibleTech. He is a member of the North American Patristics Society (NAPS). He works as the information architect for Greek databases and also the product manager of New Testament Greek, New Testament textual criticism, and Patristics resources for Logos Bible Software.

The Apostolic Fathers Greek-English Interlinear

  • General Editor and Translator: Rick Brannan
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2010

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6

Those known as “Apostolic Fathers” wrote what has become some of the most important literature in the early church—letters and epistolary documents, homilies and theological tracts, documents on church order, and apocalyptic literature. In fact, some texts came close to inclusion in the New Testament canon. Tertullian regarded Hermas as Scripture, Irenaeus treated 1 Clement as canonical, and Origen regarded the Didache as inspired. Barnabas and Hermas were included in Codex Sinaiticus and 1 Clement and 2 Clement were included in Codex Alexandrinus. The near-canonical status of the writings of the Apostolic Fathers in the early church makes their importance for modern study undisputed.

Following the model of other interlinears produced by Lexham Press (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Septuagint), The Apostolic Fathers Greek–English Interlinear presents two levels of interlinear translation. The first is the lexical value, which is a gloss of the lexical or dictionary form of the word. The second is the English literal translation, a contextually sensitive gloss of the inflected form of the word. The difference in these glosses is subtle, but powerful. The first gloss answers the question, “What does this word mean?” The second gloss answers the question, “What does this word mean here?”

In addition to the interlinear translations, direct links to Louw and Nida’s Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament based on Semantic Domains are provided for every Greek word, except for those words not present in the Greek New Testament. These links are context-sensitive and connect directly to the appropriate Louw and Nida article. Those familiar with Louw and Nida’s lexicon know that one Greek word may have many different entries in the lexicon, one for each semantic sense. These Louw-Nida references jump to the appropriate article when there is more than one option—providing a contextually-appropriate lexicon definition for the word under study. These links also allow for searching the Apostolic Fathers text by Louw-Nida domain and article information.

This new interlinear from Lexham Press makes the Greek text of the Apostolic Fathers more accessible and useful for a larger audience. It features a literal translation for each word, a grammatically-informed context sensitive gloss, and other interlinear features. It also includes morphological tagging, idioms and cross-references, and lexical, text-critical, and translational notes.

Rick Brannan has been reading, studying, translating, writing, and blogging about the Apostolic Fathers for years. He edited An English-Greek Reverse Interlinear of the Apostolic Fathers and The Lexham English Bible English-Greek Reverse Interlinear of the New Testament. He has published articles in Bible Study Magazine and presented on matters of Greek grammar and syntax at national meetings for the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) and the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS). He also presented at the Bible Technologies Conference, BibleTech. He is a member of the North American Patristics Society (NAPS). He works as the information architect for Greek databases and also the product manager of New Testament Greek, New Testament textual criticism, and Patristics resources for Logos Bible Software.

The Dead Sea Scrolls Study Edition: Vol. I: 1Q1–4Q273–Vol. II: 4Q274–11Q31 (Translations)

  • Editors: Florentino García Martínez and Eibert J.C. Tigchelaar
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 1997

The Dead Sea Scrolls Study Edition is a practical reference tool to facilitate access to the Qumran collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls. It contains newly edited English translations of the non-biblical scrolls on facing pages, arranged by serial number from Cave 1 to Cave 11.

In addition, it offers a summary of the contents of the biblical scrolls from Qumran. Each Q-number is provided with a heading which contains the essential information on the text and selected bibliographical references. Although unidentified and unclassified fragments have been omitted, and no snippets of manuscripts have been reproduced, this edition aims to be complete for the non-biblical scrolls.

Please note that this contains only the translations of the Dead Sea Scrolls: Study Edition. For full product containing the Aramaic and Hebrew transcriptions, check out The Dead Sea Scrolls Study Edition: vol. I: 1Q1–4Q273–vol. II: 4Q274–11Q31

The authors are to be congratulated for producing a well-conceived and well-executed work that will be of immense practical value to students and scholars alike.

The Catholic Biblical Quarterly

The Jerusalem Talmud, A Translation and Commentary

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Volumes: 28 (in one resource)
  • Pages: 9,251

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Jerusalem Talmud, or Yerushalmi, is a commentary on the oral law (the Mishnah) of Israel that ties that oral law to the written law (the Torah, the Hebrew Scripture). Completed about 200 years prior to The Babylonian Talmud.

Now all thirty-nine Yerushalmi tractates, as translated by Professor Neusner and Tzvee Zahavy, have been brought together in a single searchable resource. In addition to a preface and general introduction to the whole work, Professor Neusner has provided fresh and helpful introductions to each of the tractates. He has also provided within his translation the references to Bible verses alluded to in the Yerushalmi.

Jacob Neusner is Research Professor of Religion and Theology, Bard College, and Senior Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Theology at Bard College. He has published more than nine hundred books and innumerable articles, and he is editor of The Dictionary of Judaism in the Biblical Period and the five-volume Encyclopaedia of Judaism. He has also served as President of the American Academy of Religion, and was appointed as Member of the National Council on the Humanities and the National Council on the Arts.

The Babylonian Talmud, A Translation and Commentary

  • Editor: Jacob Neusner
  • Publisher: Hendrickson Publishers
  • Publication Date: 2010
  • Volumes: 22 (in one resource)
  • Pages: 16,530

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Talmud of Babylonia (a.k.a., the Bavli, or Babylonian Talmud), is a sustained commentary on the written and oral law of Israel. Compiled between 500–600 C.E., it offers a magnificent record of how Jewish scholars preserved a humane and enduring civilization. Representing the primary document of rabbinic Judaism, it throws considerable light on the New Testament as well.

This monumental English translation was completed a decade ago—but was extraordinarily expensive and difficult to find. Featuring translations by Jacob Neusner, Tzvee Zahavy, Alan Avery-Peck, B. Barry Levy, Peter Haas, and Martin S. Jaffee, and commentary and new introductions by Jacob Neusner, all thirty-seven Talmudic tractates are available in this single searchable resource. With Logos Bible Software, the instantaneous searches by word or phrase provide exceptional research capabilities, and opens swift avenues for exploration and discovery.

Jacob Neusner is Research Professor of Religion and Theology, Bard College, and Senior Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Theology at Bard College. He has published more than nine hundred books and innumerable articles, and he is editor of The Dictionary of Judaism in the Biblical Period and the five-volume Encyclopaedia of Judaism. He has also served as President of the American Academy of Religion, and was appointed as Member of the National Council on the Humanities and the National Council on the Arts.

The Mishnah: A New Translation

  • Author: Jacob Neusner
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication Date: 1988

The eminent Judaica scholar Jacob Neusner provides here the first form-analytical translation of the Mishnah. This pathbreaking edition provides as close to a literal translation as possible, following the syntax of Mishnaic Hebrew in its highly formalized and syntactically patterned language. Demonstrating that the Mishnah is a work of careful and formal poetry and prose, Neusner not only analyzes the repeated constructions but also divides the thoughts on the printed page so that the patterned language and the poetry comprised in those patterns emerge visually.

Mekhilta de-Rabbi Ishmael, volumes 1 & 2

  • Author: Jacob Z. Lauterbach
  • Publisher: Jewish Publication Society
  • Publication Date: 2004
  • Pages: 1,200

Sample pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

Mekhilta de-Rabbi Ishmael is a classic collection of midrash. It contains commentary on a large part of the Book of Exodus (chapters 12 to 23) and represents the two main modes of interpretation: the halakhah (legal doctrine), and the aggadah (moral and religious teachings). The work also contains allusions to historical events and ancient legends not found elsewhere. A new introduction by noted scholar David Stern highlights the work. It retains the original text – based on manuscript and early editions – from the JPS 1933 edition.

This classic work is widely recognized as a model of meticulous and thorough scholarship. Its translation is accurate, straightforward, and usable by scholars, students, and lay readers. Out of print for many years, Mekhilta de-Rabbi Ishmael should belong to every rabbi, rabbinical school, and Jewish Studies professor, or anyone interested in Midrash.

Jacob Lauterbach (1873-1942) was born in Galicia, studied in Germany, and received rabbinical ordination. In 1903 he immigrated to America and later became professor of Talmud at the Hebrew Union College. A prolific author, his greatest work is considered to be his edition of the Mekhilta, originally published in 1933.

Mekhilta de-Rabbi Shimon bar Yohai

  • Author: W. David Nelson
  • Publisher: Jewish Publication Society
  • Publication Date: 2006
  • Pages: 1,100

The Mekhilta de-Rabbi Shimon bar Yohai is a collection of classical midrashic interpretation of the biblical Book of Exodus. Lost for centuries, the text was reconstructed and recovered in the 19th and 20th centuries by both German and Israeli scholars from a variety of source materials, including medieval manuscripts of the text and midrashic anthologies. As one of the first collections of rabbinic biblical interpretation, the Mekhilta de-Rabbi Shimon bar Yohai is an indispensable source for understanding the history, beliefs, and practices of the earliest rabbis. A critical introduction provides the reader with a firm grounding in the historical setting of the text, as well as its source material, reconstruction, subject matter, and significance for understanding the history of Judaism.

W. David Nelson received an M.A. in bible and cognate studies and Ph.D. in rabbinic literature and thought from Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. He is the Rosalyn and Manny Rosenthal Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies and the director of the Program in Jewish Studies at Texas Christian University and Brite Divinity School in Fort Worth, Texas.

The Nag Hammadi Library in English

  • General Editor: James M. Robinson
  • Managing Editor: Richard Smith
  • Edition: 4th rev.
  • Publisher: Brill
  • Publication Date: 1996
  • Pages: 549

The Gospels of Thomas, Mary, and Philip—texts that have garnered so much discussion recently in both the scholarly world and in popular literature, such as The Da Vinci Code—are just a few of the many Gnostic documents contained in The Nag Hammadi Library. These documents are invaluable sources for the study of Gnosticism and "alternate Christianities" that competed with the early orthodox church.

This new edition is the result of ten years of additional research, and editorial and critical work. Every translation has been changed or added to; many have been thoroughly revised. This edition also includes a translation of the Berlin Gnostic Papyrus 8502 (which is not really part of the Nag Hammadi Codices but shares some similarities).

Each text is accompanied by a new and expanded introduction. Also included are a revised general introduction and an afterword discussing the modern relevance of Gnosticism, from Voltaire and Blake through Melville and Yeats to Jack Kerouac and science fiction writer Philip K. Dick.

The translations and introductions to the Nag Hammadi texts are by members of the Coptic Gnostic Library Project, which includes such scholars as Helmut Koester, George McRae, and Elaine Pagels.

The Apocryphal New Testament: Being the Apocryphal Gospels, Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypses

  • Author: Montague Rhodes James
  • Publisher: Clarendon Press
  • Publication Date: 1924
  • Pages: 578

The Apocryphal New Testament contains a wide range of early Christian writings in a clear English translation. As a collection of religious books, Apocryphal literature was meant to reinforce Christian belief and practice. As history, the Apocrypha aims to supplement the historical data in the New Testament. Their stories are remarkable, beautiful, and imaginative, and have exercised a powerful influence on the development of Christianity. Anyone who cares about the history of Christian thought cannot neglect them.

Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha

  • Author: Rick Brannan
  • Publisher: Lexham Press
  • Publication Date: 2012

The documents in this resource are primary sources that show the religious context around the early church. Written after the ministry of Christ and the apostles, these collections of writings are not considered to be divinely inspired and were considered by many early Christians to be heretical. These writings were never included in a Bible but were used by some heretical groups. They are useful in tracing the history of non-Christian understandings of Jesus and the teachings of the apostles.

Lexham Press is pleased to present the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha. It includes the Greek text—with automated morphology—of several apocryphal gospels in Greek (Infancy, Passion, and Post-Resurrection), papyrus fragments, and a small collection of agrapha. Introductions, bibliographies, and the English translation for each gospel are provided.

Logos Bible Software has all the resources you need for studying the apocryphal gospels in Greek. The Logos edition of the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha provides an easy way to study these writings side by side with your other apocryphal resources like M. R. James’ The Apocryphal New Testament. Double-click any word and your preferred lexicon will automatically open to the exact entry! Whether your interest is simple cultural study or in-depth genre studies, the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha will help you study these texts.

Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, vol. 1

  • Publication Date: 1983
  • Pages: 1,056

Volume 1 of this work contains two sections. The first is Apocalyptic Literature and Related Works. An apocalypse, from the Greek meaning revelation or disclosure, is a certain type of literature which was a special feature of religions in late antiquity. In the past, the definition was derived from the study of only some of the extant apocalypses, especially the Apocalypse, the Book of Revelation. This has changed, and the present edition of the pseudepigrapha includes nineteen documents that are apocalypses or related literature. It will now be easier to perceive the richness of apocalyptic literature and the extent of early Jewish and Christian apocalyptic ideas and apocalyptic religion.

These new translations present these important documents, many for the first time in modern English, for all "People of the Book" to study, contemplate, and understand.

Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, vol. 2

  • Publication Date: 1985
  • Pages: 1,056

The publication of Volume 2 of Charlesworth's Pseudepigrapha completes his landmark work. Together with Volume 1, Apocalyptic Literature and Testaments, these new translations present important documents, many for the first time in English.

The second volume contains Expansions of the "Old Testament" and Legends, Wisdom and Philosophical Literature, Prayers, Psalms and Odes, Fragments of lost Judeo-Hellenistic Works. The section on the Old Testament contains clarifications, enrichments, expansions, and retellings of biblical narratives. The primary focus is upon God's story in history, the ongoing drama in which the author claims to participate. Charlesworth's discussion of Wisdom literature contains various collections of wise sayings and philosophical maxims of the Israelites. In his discussion of Psalms, prayers, and odes, Charlesworth presents collection of hymns, expressions of praise, songs of joy and sorrow, and prayers of petition that were important in the period 100 B. C. to A. D. 200. The section of fragments of lost Judeo-Hellenistic works reflect ideas associated with the Persians, Greeks, and Romans, often filtered through the cultures of Syria and Egypt. These fragments are examples of how this mix of cultures influenced Jewish writings.

The Works of Philo

  • Authors: Philo of Alexandria and Charles Duke Yonge
  • Publisher: Hendrickson
  • Publication Date: 1995
  • Pages: 924

Philo of Alexandria was a Jewish philosopher who lived in Roman-ruled Egypt. When the Jews of Alexandria were ordered to defy their beliefs and worship Gaius Julius Caesar, also known as Caligula, they sent Philo to plead their case to the emperor. Philo’s writings provide an account of the atrocities the Jews faced for their refusal to glorify a man as a god. They were dragged to death, burned alive with their families, slaughtered in their homes, and even crucified. Well versed in Greek and Jewish learning, Philo integrated biblical teachings with Greek philosophy, giving rise to an influential approach to Scripture. The ideas that emerged impacted both Christian and Jewish religious thought.

Complete and unabridged, this updated version of The Works of Philo is the most complete one-volume edition of the writings of Philo. Here in translation by the eminent classicist, C. D. Yonge, this edition provides easy access to writing crucial for historians and students of Hellenistic Judaism and early Christianity.

The Works of Josephus

  • Authors: Flavius Josephus and William J. Whiston
  • Publisher: Hendrickson
  • Publication Date: 1987

Titus Flavius Josephus, as a writer and historical figure, sits at the intersection of history. After being captured by Roman forces led by Vespasian, Josephus claimed that the Jewish Messianic prophecies pointed to Vespasian as the future Emperor of Rome. Two years later, Vespasian did become Emperor, and he granted Josephus his freedom. Josephus took on Vespasian’s family name—Flavius—and became a Roman citizen. As a historian, Josephus provided invaluable records of the Jewish War, addressed to the Jews living in Mesopotamia. Throughout Christian history, the writings of Josephus have been indispensable to a proper understanding of Jewish thought, background, and history up to and around the time of Christ.

This volume provides the most complete one-volume edition of William Whiston’s classic translation of the Works of Josephus, with the full text and notes of the original four-volume set.

More details about these resources

Show More