Products>Fortress Commentary on the Bible (2 vols.)

Fortress Commentary on the Bible (2 vols.)

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Overview

Interpret Scripture for a complex and pluralistic world with this balanced synthesis of current scholarship on the Bible. These commentaries set the biblical books in their historical and cultural contexts, discussing themes that have proven most important for the Christian interpretive tradition. Including contributions from 70 renowned authorities in the historical interpretation of the Old and New Testaments, the Fortress Commentary on the Bible is sensitive to theological and cultural issues, richly diverse in social locations and vantage points, and represents a broad array of theological commitment—Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and others. Most of all, it is alive to the ethical consequences of biblical interpretation today—an ideal resource for preaching, teaching, and research in the modern world.

For another scholarly commentary set from Fortress, check out the Fortress Biblical Preaching Commentaries Collection (3 vols.).

  • Includes contributions from 70 experts in the historical interpretation of Scripture
  • Provides commentary from a variety of theological vantage points
  • Focuses on the consequences of biblical interpretation in the modern world
  • Title: Fortress Commentary on the Bible
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Volumes: 2
  • Pages: 1,750
  • Resource Type: Commentary
  • Topic: Biblical Studies

In the Logos edition, these volumes are enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

The Old Testament and Apocrypha

  • Editors: Gale A. Yee, Hugh R. Page Jr., and Matthew J.M. Coomber
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 1,050

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Fortress Commentary on the Bible: Old Testament and Apocrypha presents a balanced synthesis of current scholarship, enabling readers to interpret Scripture for a complex and pluralistic world.

The contributors bring a rich diversity of perspectives to the task of connecting solid historical critical analysis of the Scripture with sensitivity to theological, cultural, and interpretive issues arising in our encounter with the text. The contributors represent a broad array of theological commitment—Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and others.

The introductory articles and section introductions in the volume discuss the dramatic challenges that have shaped contemporary interpretation of the Old Testament and Apocrypha. Individual book articles provide an introduction and commentary on key sense units that are explored through the lenses of three critical questions:

  • The text in its ancient context: What did the text probably mean in its original historical and cultural context?
  • The text in the interpretive tradition: How have centuries of reading and interpreting shaped our understanding of the text?
  • The text in contemporary discussion: What are the unique challenges and interpretive questions that arise for readers and hearers of the text today?

The result is a commentary that is comprehensive and useful for preaching, teaching, and research.

The Fortress Commentary on the Bible provides an excellent resource for beginning students and Bible study groups. It includes many fine contributions by experienced and reliable scholars, and the bibliographies are a treasure trove.

John J. Collins, Holmes Professor of Old Testament Criticism and Interpretation, Yale Divinity School

Gale A. Yee is Nancy W. King Professor of Biblical Studies at Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and former general editor of Semeia Studies. She is the editor of Exodus and Deuteronomy: Texts @ Contexts.

Hugh R. Page Jr. is associate professor of theology and Africana studies as well as vice president, associate provost, and dean of the first year of studies at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Israel’s Poetry of Resistance: Africana Perspectives on Early Hebrew Verse.

Matthew J.M. Coomber is assistant professor of biblical studies at St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa. He is the author of ReReeading the Prophets through the Corporate Globalization: A Cultural-Evolutionary Approach to Economic Injustice in the Hebrew Bible.

The New Testament

  • Editors: Margaret Aymer, Cynthia Briggs Kittredge, and David A. Sánchez
  • Publisher: Fortress Press
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Pages: 700

Sample Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7

The Fortress Commentary on the Bible: The New Testament presents a balanced synthesis of current scholarship, enabling readers to interpret Scripture for a complex and pluralistic world.

The contributors bring a rich diversity of perspectives to the task of connecting solid historical critical analysis of the Scripture with sensitivity to theological, cultural, and interpretive issues arising in our encounter with the text. The contributors represent a broad array of theological commitment—Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and others.

The introductory articles and section introductions in the volume discuss the dramatic challenges that have shaped contemporary interpretation of the Old Testament and Apocrypha. Individual book articles provide an introduction and commentary on key sense units that are explored through the lenses of three critical questions:

  • The text in its ancient context: What did the text probably mean in its original historical and cultural context?
  • The text in the interpretive tradition: How have centuries of reading and interpreting shaped our understanding of the text?
  • The text in contemporary discussion: What are the unique challenges and interpretive questions that arise for readers and hearers of the text today?

The result is a commentary that is comprehensive and useful for preaching, teaching, and research.

Very impressive—the best one-volume scholarly commentary on the New Testament available today.

Marcus J. Borg, Hundere Distinguished Professor of Religion and Culture Emeritus, Oregon State University

While most biblical commentaries of the past have focused either on the text in its original context, or in contemporary interpretation—or attempted to combine the two with very little in between— this new approach takes on the three aspects of ancient context, contemporary discussion, and the middle ground of the interpretive tradition. In response to recent interest in the history of interpretation, this represents a welcome new approach that gives readers an introduction to the rich interpretive tradition that has happened over the centuries between the biblical writings and our own interaction with them.

Carolyn Osiek, Charles Fischer Professor of New Testament Emerita, Brite Divinity School

The new Fortress Commentary on the Bible offers a tool for encountering Scripture in a new and multi-faceted way. Like many commentaries on the Bible, it provides information on the cultural and social situation in which the biblical text was composed. . . . Unlike many commentaries, this one is more interested in stimulating a critical encounter with the biblical text than in providing a set of answers about what it once may have meant. With this approach, [it is] particularly useful to intelligent modern readers of the Bible—who respect its role as a formative text in the development of the Christian tradition, but who also approach the text sensitive to its potential disfunction. It promises to be a welcome tool for pastors and teachers seeking to encourage a thoughtful and critical engagement with the Bible.

Harold W. Attridge, Sterling Professor of Divinity, Yale Divinity School

Margaret Aymer is associate professor of New Testament at the Interdenominational Theological Center in Atlanta, Georgia. She is the author of Confessing the Beatitudes, Ecumenical Edition and First Pure, Then Peaceable: Frederick Douglas Reads James.

Cynthia Briggs Kittredge is president, dean, and professor of New Testament at Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas. She is the author of Conversations with Scripture: The Gospel of John.

David A. Sánchez is associate professor of theological studies and director of American cultures at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California. He is the author of From Patmos to the Barrio: Subverting Imperial Myths.