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John Gill's Sermons and Tracts (3 vols.)
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John Gill's Sermons and Tracts (3 vols.)

by

G. Keith 1773–1778

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$42.99

Overview

Gill was a pastor at Strict Baptist Church for over 50 years, and in this three volume set, his most memorable sermons and expositions are collected. Included in his first volume are his annual, occasional, and funeral sermons, as well as a biography of Gill. His second volume contains Gill’s ordinations and polemical sermons, as well as his dissertations on various Scriptures, some of which were not published until this 1773 edition. The final volume includes Gill’s sermons on the Trinity, the Resurrection, justification, the love of God, predestination, as well as essays on church guidance and planning. It also includes Gill's famous work on the Trinity: The Doctrine of the Trinity Stated and Vindicated, as well as A Dissertation Concerning the Antiquity of the Hebrew Language, Letters, Vowel-Points, and Accents.

In the Logos edition, this volume is enhanced by amazing functionality. Important terms link to dictionaries, encyclopedias, and a wealth of other resources in your digital library. Perform powerful searches to find exactly what you’re looking for. Take the discussion with you using tablet and mobile apps. With Logos Bible Software, the most efficient and comprehensive research tools are in one place, so you get the most out of your study.

Interested in more? Be sure to check out The Works of John Gill

Product Details

Individual Titles

  • Sermons and Tracts, vol. 1
  • Sermons and Tracts, vol. 2
  • Sermons and Tracts, vol. 3

About John Gill

John Gill (1697–1771) was born in Kettering, Northamptonshire. He became a Baptist clergyman, a biblical scholar, and a staunch Calvinist. Gill was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Aberdeen in 1748. Gill pastored at Benjamin Keach’s former church, New Park Street Chapel. Later, he pastored what would become Charles Spurgeon’s Metropolitan Tabernacle for 51 years.