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A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life: In Israel, in Judaism, and in Christianity
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A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life: In Israel, in Judaism, and in Christianity

by

A & C Black 1899

Runs on Windows, Mac and mobile.
$18.99

Overview

This work details the Hebrew, Jewish, and Christian view of the final condition of man and of the world. R.H. Charles traces the development and historical context of eschatological doctrines from the time of Moses to the close of the New Testament. He examines the eschatology of the individual and the nation in the Old Testament, the eschatology of apocryphal and apocalyptic literature from the second century BC through the second century AD, the eschatology of the New Testament, and the Pauline eschatology in its four stages.

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Key Features

  • Provides an overview of eschatological doctrines
  • Discusses relevant Scripture passages
  • Rebuts alternative theological viewpoints

Product Details

  • Title: A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life: In Israel, in Judaism, and in Christianity
  • Author: R.H. Charles
  • Publisher: A&C Black
  • Publication Date: 1899
  • Pages: 438
  • Resource Type: Topical
  • Topic: Eschatology

About R.H. Charles

R. H. Charles (1865–1943) is recognized as one of the leading figures in Enoch scholarship, and his masterly translation remains the standard edition of the text in English. An authority on apocalyptic literature, he became canon at Westminster Abbey in 1913 and an archdeacon in 1919. Charles is also the author of A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Revelation of St. John, vols. 1 and 2, and The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament.